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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    Hilton Head Island - OB, SD
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    Yeah, its just weird... Here in San Diego, even the wife agrees that if we dont live AT the beach (walking distance), than what is the point in living in SoCal... I have asked her if she wanted to move even 5 minutes inland, so we could rent a house with a yard instead of an apartment, and we both agree its just not worth it... But in reality, anywhere in San Diego is a 15 minute drive to consistent surf year round...

    So, how on earth I am even considering all these things, like living in baltimore etc, is beyond me. I guess when you have a bun in the oven, it changes things...

    But yeah, I mean, if living 15 minutes from the beach takes water time from you, 2 hours is a killer.

    And yeah, I dont even have a crash spot out in OC. All my freinds grew up and moved inland too.

    So, I was just curious. I mean, I know how hard i worked to get to surf everyday, so initially I look at it like No one can ever keep me from the ocean. Not even a 2-3 hour drive would stop me. I care THAT much. It is my passion, blah blah... Same as everyone else...

    But I just know whats real and whats not, and having a business, a wife and a baby... who am I kidding thinking I will be able to slip away to surf OC every time I get a day off....

    So, my perfect world, is me, the wife and baby in OC MD/Ocean pines... and spending weekends DRIVING TO BMORE to visit family... I told the wife. I will spend EVERY SECOND with her parents inside the beltway as long as I get the other 5 days a week at the ocean....

    But that all SOUNDS great... But again, everything will have to work out perfectly...

    Im thinking at this point of saving up a bunch, just heading out to OC MD and renting a house either in the pines, or a condo up in the north side, and seeing what happens... Worst case scenerio, we end up having to run back to bmore anyway cause work etc isnt working out...

    But I am a restaurant GM, my wife is a Pastry Chef, so theoretically, OC MD has work... But i am in a pretty high pay teir for my industry, which OC MD simple cant match, but who cares, I will run a crab shack if I have to. Money is money....

    And the wife and I have served tables, bar tended and all that, so we have a lot to fall back on in that town, but I just dont think I can get a competetive paying GM job year round... Im scared of that....

    So, in a perfect world, OC MD will be my home again soon. But we will see. It will be enough shock moving back there. Baltimore... Man...

    And to the guy living in Baltimore who was speaking of the ugly people and dead bodies... All surfing aside, living in Baltimore for 5 years is what made me want to leave MD more than anything. I lived on Preston st. and Guillford Ave... the 300 Block of E. Preston St... Gunshots from greenmount every night.

    I used to work at the hardrock downtown and would see the dead bodies get scooped up every spring by the sifting boats... I mean, that is EXACTLY why I left the tri-state area... Because of Baltimore and DC....

    But back then, I was a city kid, living downtown. By "Baltimore", I now mean WAAAAAYYYY out in the county....

    the wifes fam lives out on the water in SE Bmore County... Pretty nice... but still.... surf. surf. surf.

    Thanks for the tips though... I am doing everything I can to make the OC thing happen. I just hope all the planets align and I can find us some work.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Hilton Head Island - OB, SD
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    Moving to San Diego was easy... You save 5K, pack your sh**, get an apartment and within 24 hours I had like 3 job offers....

    But this area has 3.5 million people. The 6th largest economy in the nation... So relocating here was a cake walk... There are people out here handing money away...

    But going from a HUGE job market, back to a seasonal one with less than 10,000 people ACTALLY living in the city is a HUGE change...

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    12
    I have never lived at the beach, so I don't know the aspect of what it would be like to have it and give it up. However, I picked up surfing when I was slightly closer to the beach, but I now live about 3 hours from the nearest beach (decent EC waves). Other options are 3.5 from beach with better waves and 5.5 for entry point into OBX. That has been true of the last 2.5 years where I have really increased the amount of time that I am surfing, going at it especially hard (multiple trips per month). Given the time and distance though, my water time is not even remotely what it would be if I lived closer to the beach, so I am probably in grom state (even though I am over 30 years old). I know the time is much less than what it could be if I were closer, despite burning up any weekend and vacation day that I have rushing and scrambling to get to the beach to catch anything. If it has been long enough, I do mean anything that is even remotely rideable. Since I am thinking of doing the opposite, actually moving to where you are, considering leaving and sacrificing the better career/job (or attempting to take it with me) in order to be closer to waves that are consistently better, perhaps I can provide some perspective that may help you.

    In my own life, I can say that living that far from the beach turns surfing into something that you kick everything else in the trash for. Fickle swell on the way, you ditch important moments in your life or the lives of those around you because you know that you have to haul @$# to get to the beach in time. When you come back, the surfing may have purified your mind and body but the miles add up. It will seem like you are constantly tired during the week. On the other hand if you have time off but no swell is on the horizon, you will be infuriated that the stars are not aligning for you. If no one else around you surfs, then you will alienate yourself from other friends for surfing, as they will want to do "inland" things during the weekend, while you will be off chasing swell, probably solo. Solo because (if you are older) very few people inland are willing to drop and go; you may find a few that will go occasionally. You won't have time during other evenings for anything because you have to get caught up on everything that you blew off during the days that you went surfing. It may impact your marriage; it was a contributing (but not the only) factor to making mine non-existant. However, that will all depend on your situation. In the end, some of the sacrifices are worth it. Surfing will always be there for you. I don't know if all of them are though.

    Similar to others, I would say to get as close to the beach as possible. In my mind, the closer you are, the more likely you can work the surfing into your life. If you are too far away, then it seems like it has to dominate your life in order for you to do it consistently.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    485
    Quote Originally Posted by zach619 View Post

    But going from a HUGE job market, back to a seasonal one with less than 10,000 people ACTALLY living in the city is a HUGE change...
    I hear ya there. My parents own a condo and rent it during the summer, so during the off-season I suppose I'm spoiled more than most, but there's usually a way to make it happen regardless. The internet age steals a lot of the sociable aspects, but I think surfers at heart are still generous folks. I've housed plenty of friends over the years and continue to do so now.

    And now my story...
    I started surfing while going to school in Annapolis. I had a group of friends from SoCal, and we would drive 2 hours and get skunked all the time. A long drive followed by DVD's and lunch at Denny's can be depressing, but good friends make it worthwhile. Having all that extra time (and very little money), we got to know Lee at Malibu's really well. We'd hang out there quite a bit since we had nothing else to do and didn't have reliable surf forecasting or smart phones "back then" (2002). It was a different world, only 8 years ago! Anyhow, we still scored plenty of times, and it felt gratifying to get good waves after so much effort.

    Then I moved to Monterey, CA for grad school with a decent point break visible from the front porch. Needless to say, I surfed at least once a day for most of the year.

    Then came Hawaii, where the north shore was a 40 min drive. It sounds like a hassle, but it's different when you're almost guaranteed rideable conditions almost every day (kinda like San Diego, I suppose). I'd leave work and make the drive 4-6 days each week.

    Then Charleston, 20 min to Folly Beach, generally worse conditions than OC MD. FRUSTRATING! But with the short drive, it was still easy to get 2+ days per week and no problem surfing after work.

    Then upstate NY: FIVE HOURS to Newport, RI. There are plenty of surf vid's of this place going off, but it's pretty inconsistent. I was working shift work at the time and once left Saratoga Springs at 11 pm after finishing my shift and drove through the night and scored amazing waves. I only surfed 5 days in six months.

    Virginia Beach...oddly enough, still 15 minutes to the beach, and the waves aren't so good normally, so I usually had to drive over an hour to NC for good surf, which was aggravating.

    Now I live in Annapolis again. Like you (Zach), my life has become more complicated. I missed the last two swells due to family/friend emergencies and work. It's incredibly depressing to see the pic's, knowing I was a mere 2 hours away. That "quick" drive suddenly looks a lot longer during the futile effort to ditch work early during the winter, mentally timing the length of the coming session as it dwindles down with the 4:30 sunset. It becomes a totally different ballgame when the drive is over 30-45 minutes and you realize those little surprise swells on the weekdays just aren't going to happen, and the hurricane swell conveniently arrives on a Wednesday morning, leaving shin-high dribble for you on Friday.

    It's a trade-off. I would tell the younger guys to just go for it. I wouldn't trade my early-20's surfing life for anything in the world. It was something special that I think defines me as a person. That being said, I have other motives in my life, and it's not just about money. Even if I could live in OC now, I probably wouldn't. That's a tough pill to swallow sometimes, especially on Monday. I skipped out early to make the drive, then got called back in to fill out some forms for a "nomination" to possibly get suckered into an 8 MONTH assignment in Afghanistan. Missing the swell suddenly didn't sound so bad when that prospect reared its ugly head.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    485
    Quote Originally Posted by surfclt View Post
    In my own life, I can say that living that far from the beach turns surfing into something that you kick everything else in the trash for. Fickle swell on the way, you ditch important moments in your life or the lives of those around you because you know that you have to haul @$# to get to the beach in time. When you come back, the surfing may have purified your mind and body but the miles add up. It will seem like you are constantly tired during the week. On the other hand if you have time off but no swell is on the horizon, you will be infuriated that the stars are not aligning for you. If no one else around you surfs, then you will alienate yourself from other friends for surfing, as they will want to do "inland" things during the weekend, while you will be off chasing swell, probably solo. Solo because (if you are older) very few people inland are willing to drop and go; you may find a few that will go occasionally. You won't have time during other evenings for anything because you have to get caught up on everything that you blew off during the days that you went surfing. It may impact your marriage; it was a contributing (but not the only) factor to making mine non-existant. However, that will all depend on your situation. In the end, some of the sacrifices are worth it. Surfing will always be there for you. I don't know if all of them are though.
    Well said! I literally spent my entire 2 years in Hawaii in a perpetual state of exhaustion. I'd work eight-ten hours, drive 40 minutes with my friend to surf an hour and a half or so, scarf down some burrito's, then drive 40 min back to our place, wake up barely able to move, then do it all over again...for weeks at a time. Given the chance, I'd do it all over again the exact same way...well, maybe charge a little bit harder.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Hilton Head Island - OB, SD
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    Thanks for all the feedback guys. Your words of wisdom are helpful.

    After living selfishly for a decade, doing EVERYTHING for surf, I am now faced with some tough decisions. And although you always know that these decisions are going to come in life, you never can prepare for them....

    I mean, I toned my surfing down a lot in the past years. I feel like in about 2007, I hit the peak of my skill level as far as "mastering" surfing. I worked hard enough to consistently land airs, pull into big barrels and charge the largest days that California had to offer. Now, only 3 years later, I just ENJOY surfing. Im not trying to get into comps and run all over Baja every week... Now, I walk to the end of my street, and 90% of the time, I surf the jetty at the end of the street. I go to Blacks now only because its right by my work... All I do now is surf. I dont think. I dont stay up watching vids all night in Slow Motion to see exactly what part of the ascent up the wave face that Taj Grabs his rail on a frontside Air... I dont want the lines in slow-mo over and over to see exactly how kelly lined up that huge barrel. I used to get INSANELY pissed off if ANYTHING kept me out of the water, even on a crappy chest high day... I would fight with the lady... Tell my friends i wasnt waiting for them cause they are lazy... I was nutzo... wave crazy.

    I just surf now. I went from 7 days a week, to an honest 3-4... When the wife and I have a day off, unless I get up super early, I dont surf... I dont get all pissed off that I didnt surf one day, cause the surf here is consistent...

    So I guess what im saying is that I have slowed down how hard I charge in recent years, but I am SOOOO happy with my surfing. Its like everything is exactly where it needs to be. SO, now, after investing that much and getting good at what I really love, i dont want to see it slip away....

    But it sounds like we all have been there in one way or another...

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Jacksonville FL
    Posts
    459
    No kids but did the inland gig for 3 years (60 to 90 mins depending on traffic). Not much surfing years 1 & 2 but by year three I had it down. Leave work 2 minutes early to beat the parking lot rush, swing by the house to pick up strategically stored board & suit /drop a load in the toilet, and then full speed to the oceanfront or smack into Hampton Roads tunnel traffic. The days were too short nov-feb to surf with out playing hookie from work for an hour (did it only when it really counted) but the rest of the year I surfed fickle VB at least 3 times a week in consistent spring and fall. The inland surfer does exist. I live minutes from the beach now and don't surf that much more time wise comparatively. More often... yes but longer sessions... no... due to consistent surf. I remember surfing 1st street by boardwalk lights in November or December getting every wave I could out of a evening session. You can make it work to log water time if you want to... you just have to want to.

  8. #18
    Zach,
    Don't limit your job search to just ocmd. If you can deal with catering to the lifestyle, there are tons of nice restaurants in the Rehoboth area that may have some opportunities for you.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
    Posts
    2,416
    Quote Originally Posted by zach619 View Post
    now, after investing that much and getting good at what I really love, i dont want to see it slip away
    Wait 'till your years start taking their toll. Wait 'till you what you want to do and used to do turns into what you can't do anymore.

    This is gonna sound corny, but I'll say it anyway... laugh if you like. But it sounds like you're at peace with who you are as a surfer. Not everybody is... and that's sort of a torturous life. People who want to prove something to themselves are never at peace. People who have reached a point in their lives where they have nothing left to prove live a life of contentment. A lot of that contentment comes with acceptance. You've nothing to prove to yourself. You've achieved all you've expected of yourself through dedication, commitment, and practice, and you're living the life of what you believe a "surfer" should be. Now there's an opportunity for your life to change, and you need to make an important decision. Where you live, how you earn a living... all that stuff... that's just what you DO, not who you ARE.

    Waves were here before you were born, and will be here long after you're gone. All of us go from shorepound groms, to king of the peak, to shoulder hopper, through our lifespan as surfers. The trick with dealing with all these changes is keeping that peace... that contentment in knowing who we are... and knowing that there will always be waves. You can always just go surfing...

  10. #20

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by LBCrew View Post
    Wait 'till your years start taking their toll. Wait 'till you what you want to do and used to do turns into what you can't do anymore.

    This is gonna sound corny, but I'll say it anyway... laugh if you like. But it sounds like you're at peace with who you are as a surfer. Not everybody is... and that's sort of a torturous life. People who want to prove something to themselves are never at peace. People who have reached a point in their lives where they have nothing left to prove live a life of contentment. A lot of that contentment comes with acceptance. You've nothing to prove to yourself. You've achieved all you've expected of yourself through dedication, commitment, and practice, and you're living the life of what you believe a "surfer" should be. Now there's an opportunity for your life to change, and you need to make an important decision. Where you live, how you earn a living... all that stuff... that's just what you DO, not who you ARE.

    Waves were here before you were born, and will be here long after you're gone. All of us go from shorepound groms, to king of the peak, to shoulder hopper, through our lifespan as surfers. The trick with dealing with all these changes is keeping that peace... that contentment in knowing who we are... and knowing that there will always be waves. You can always just go surfing...
    VERY well said.