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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    North Wildwood ,Nj
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    how clean is your beach??

    This topic came up in another thread and instead of the topic taking over the thread I figured I would start one here.

    I found this looks like a pretty good tool to see you you state, town ,ect is keeping up with its enviormental resposiblities

    http://www.nrdc.org/water/oceans/ttw/ttwmap.asp

    &

    http://www.nj.gov/dep/beaches/
    Last edited by MATT JOHNSON; Jan 25, 2011 at 02:56 PM.

  2. #2
    Interesting.....here in LBNY this has been a big topic concerning our waters. Stinks!

    http://surfridercli.blogspot.com/

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AnbRz...layer_embedded

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
    Posts
    2,578
    Thank you for starting an appropriate thread for this important discussion, Matt.

    Like all beaches along stretches of overdeveloped coastline, New Jersey beaches struggle with environmental issues. Water quality changes rapidly from day to day, and even from tide to tide and beach to beach. But runoff carrying non-point source pollution is the biggest issue, by far. The more parking lots, roads, rooftops... surfaces that shed water rather than allow it to infiltrate and percolate... the greater threat to local water quality. Here in New Jersey, where overdevelopment is rampant, that means when it rains heavily, there can be issues at some beaches, particularly those that border known contaminated lakes that flow directly into the ocean. This is no secret, the damage was done a long time ago, and it is all but irreversible. But that is not to say that "nothing can be done." Better planning, better urban engineering, higher water quality standards, better monitoring, and a more comprehensive approach to environmental management can help improve water quality, in spite of the mistakes that were made in the past. So now, rather than prevention, we have to deal with mitigation. And the only threat to mitigation is our willingness to INVEST... in terms of time, effort, and money... in corrective measures. We can construct stormwater retention reservoirs to reduce runoff and improve groundwater recharge. We can treat stormwater rather than simply channeling it into existing waterways and beaches. We can regulate waste management better, and improve enforcement of existing laws. And we can start RIGHT NOW, IN OUR OWN LOCAL COMMUNITIES. If there are ordinances on the books, demand that they are enforced. Show up at environmental committee meetings and find out what's going on in town. Become active in your community, because what happens in your town directly effects what happens in the water at your local lineup.
    Last edited by LBCrew; Jan 25, 2011 at 06:44 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Monmouth County
    Posts
    1,185
    Pretty good stuff,Nice work Hyperflex.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Avon,Nc
    Posts
    151
    Lets face it New Jersey's ocean is filthy. I don't care what the EPA says when they say its safe. They cannot be trusted, it is in their interest to sway the results because can you imagine what would happen to the Jersey shore if they let the cat out of the hat. You think the economy is hurting the beach towns now. Can you imagine what would happen if they told the public that you shouldn't go in the ocean. Rents would drop like a bomb . It would have devastating impact on the local economy and the entire state of New Jersey (A.k.a the Garbage state). I know all you local Jersey surf rats love it but the water quality is a crime. The sewage plant on 45th street in Ocean City has been outdated for years. It in no way can handle the amount of **** that comes into in July. Yup it gets dumped out through a huge pipe about a mile off the beach. I remember when they were building it there was a break next to the temporary pipe. I am sorry if I insult you guys but its reality. Remember now trust your Government they never lie.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Cape May Co, NJ
    Posts
    471
    My friends wife is a nurse in Atlantic Co. She said cases of MERSA are way up especially with people who have regular contact with the water. She advises staying out of the water if you have an open cut or sore. Mersa can kill you !

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    North Wildwood ,Nj
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    Quote Originally Posted by avonsurfernc View Post
    Lets face it New Jersey's ocean is filthy. I don't care what the EPA says when they say its safe. They cannot be trusted, it is in their interest to sway the results because can you imagine what would happen to the Jersey shore if they let the cat out of the hat. You think the economy is hurting the beach towns now. Can you imagine what would happen if they told the public that you shouldn't go in the ocean. Rents would drop like a bomb . It would have devastating impact on the local economy and the entire state of New Jersey (A.k.a the Garbage state). I know all you local Jersey surf rats love it but the water quality is a crime. The sewage plant on 45th street in Ocean City has been outdated for years. It in no way can handle the amount of **** that comes into in July. Yup it gets dumped out through a huge pipe about a mile off the beach. I remember when they were building it there was a break next to the temporary pipe. I am sorry if I insult you guys but its reality. Remember now trust your Government they never lie.
    Big Brother isnt out the get us . If you think the ecomony would be hurt if you had to close the beaches you are partially right but that goes for any shore community. Plus there alot of thing to do in the shore towns now than there was years ago.

    the stories of finding medical waste and stuff like that are prone to more to the areas of north nj if they are even too. I grew up in CMC and from the time I could walk i was doing something water related whether it be fishing , surifng, or sailing . I have never gotten sick once in my life from water. Like I stated I never go out after or during a heavy rain storm but that is a rule that yo follow no matter what shore town yo live in .

    And if jerseys water was so bad dont you think the fishing industry would be taking a hard hit . Last time I talked to a cpl of my friends who own and work on boats they are makin a killing and there catch has been in good number and size has been outstanding. I think if the water was really that bad here that you wouldnt be able to eat fish out of our waters

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Pinelands, NJ
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    So your personal experience at a beach with a sewage plant outfall equates to all the beaches in NJ being filthy? Have you surfed here recently? Yes, there were beach closings last year, 124 to be exact. And yes, NJ beaches were filthy in the 80's due to lax environmental regulations. But 20 years of regulation and cleanup have worked to turn the tides, literally. NRDC ranked NJ 14th out of 30 states for 09' (I will give a slight nod to NC for being 7th ), and while that may leave room for improvement we are definitely not the bottom of the barrel. If I was a conspiracy theorist maybe I would buy into your notion that the government lies to us...But the reality is that NJ's biggest economic boon comes from summer tourism dollars, and DEP and local governments recognize that. That is why there is extensive testing and monitoring in place, precautionary measures to close the beaches when necessary and not put the sheeple at risk. If our beaches were so filthy wouldn't there be more cases of illness or reports of illegal dumping in the news. The majority of the closings are from heavy weather events when the stormwater and sewerage system becomes overloaded and flushes essentially every paved surface (and what's on it) in the area. Due to the increase in volume many local treatment system can handle the overload and untreated waste ends up being discharged. Again, I'm not saying more could be done for improvement but I don't think you should trash the entire state based on your experience surfing near a sewer outfall pipe. I've surfed NJ for 20 years now and never had any serious issues other than the occasional litter, but show me a densely populated area where that doesn't happen. Maybe I am biased because I love our beaches so much, but I think if the beaches were as dirty as you make them out to be
    because we would hear a lot more about (news stories, more beach closings, surfer feedback), and the jersey beach attendance numbers would be in the toilet (2009 was an all time high as far as tourism dollar take)....Not trying to hate, just my two cents.

    But maybe some other NJ surfers/spongers have a different opinion...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
    Posts
    2,578
    All conspiracy theories, hearsay, and exaggerations aside... Wastewater treatment (sewage treatment) is a necessity, and the facility in Ocean City does discharge treated effluent about a mile off the beach. That's why shellfishing is prohibited in the area around the discharge point. However, areas that are monitored regularly adjacent to that area are open for fishing, either seasonally or year-round, and the both the state and independent monitoring of those waters and the quality of and health of the fishery is ongoing. I am aware of one episode of raw sewage being dumped into the ocean from that facility, and it wasn't in July. Still... this is inexcusable! Any wastewater treatment facility should be designed to handle the capacity of a storm without overflowing into a storm drain, which is what happened at that time. There is no reason for such an "accident," but we need to be aware that there is always a chance that it can occur. ANYWHERE. Urbanized areas of North Carolina are no exception. Sewage spills occur in some areas (Wilmington and Wrightsville) more regularly than we'd like to see. Fortunately, the Outer Banks does not have these problems.

    But this is not the main problem. As I've stated before... NON-POINT pollution is the major threat to New Jersey beaches in terms of water quality. Chemicals, bacteria, trash, and nutrients are the main culprits. People interested should DO THEIR RESEARCH and GET INVOLVED. Because fixing the problem begins with being informed. From there, we should begin to address the issue with our own behaviors, our own homes and lawns, our own pets... then begin to reach out to our communities, counties and states.

    This is a serious matter. We need an intelligent, informed, and motivated citizenry, active in their communities and committed to CHANGE if we have any hope of making progress. Slinging insults does nothing but de-motivate people by giving them the false impression that "nothing can be done." The truth is, ANYTHING can be done.

  10. #10
    LBCrew nice work and post, very proactive for the future. It appears as though you would like to do something instead of complain or move away like a coward, or an avonsurfer.

    Avonsurfer, of course the water is dirty. It's 2011, the air is dirty, the ozone is depleting and N. Korea's got mad soldiers. If you dont like it, off yourself and save room on these threads cuz all your doing is being disrespectful. We know our waters dirty, but we love surfing and those of us who aren't weak body's like yourself, dont get sick everytime someone sneezes. You recently stated that you dont surf in temps under 52 degrees, why? does your vagina begin to hurt. I bet you got booted out of some line-ups and a Benny f**ked your girlfriend, now your sore at the whole state. Get over it, You gotta be tough to survive in NJ and even tougher to be a surfer from here, obviously you couldnt cut it. Change your username, NC deserves better.

    Recycled Surfer, thanks for the info, but doing alot of things w/ an open sore or cut can kill you, like Fu#$%ng, but that doesnt stop avonsurfers boyfriend from plowing him!

    And before you get all cyber tough on me and start running your mouth like you've been doing, I surf from Deal to Seaside whenever there's swell, Im stunningly handsome and answer to the name Dan or Utah. I got a sleeve on my right arm dedicated to my fellow soldiers who didnt come back home w/ me and a tattoo of your mom on my other arm (shes wonderful). I would be happy to discuss water quality w/ you anytime.