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  1. #11
    Good thread with a lot of good info. Practice, practice, practice.
    Foot placement and knowing how to shift your weight. Also dont get discouraged if you took a beating yesterday. Remember your probabally not acustomed to surfing 6-8 ft waves daily. A 2-3 ft wave is much more foregiving when your trying to learn turns; if you place your feet in wrong place you can usually adjust. At 6-8 ft you were more than likely hanging on for dear life.

  2. #12
    is it just me or do anyone else seem that bottom turns are a lot easier on your front side. My front side bottom turns i do no promblem, but struggle a little on my backside. I get them done but its a little more sloppy and have little less control

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    152
    Quote Originally Posted by surfingboy65 View Post
    is it just me or do anyone else seem that bottom turns are a lot easier on your front side. My front side bottom turns i do no promblem, but struggle a little on my backside. I get them done but its a little more sloppy and have little less control

    Remember that on your frontside, you have more control per say because your vision is more "Right in front of you" meaning that your using both eyes as you ride down the face. With Backside, your vision is limited (in the beginning stages of learning) because your viewing out of one eye and trying the twist and contort your body in ways your not completely used to yet. Think of it as your a ninja, and you have 2 people around you...One in front, the other behind. Now it's easier to land a blow on the one in front because your vision allows you to land the blow where you want. While with the person behind you, your swing has a "Proximity area" and it's more difficult to land an exact blow.
    The same basic concept applies here

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Green Room
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    903
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    8
    Quote Originally Posted by Double Over-toe View Post
    Think of it as your a ninja...
    LOL!!!! never thought of it like that before...

  5. #15
    Surf a point break where you can continuous focus on it.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    West Long Branch, New Jersey, United States
    Posts
    37
    I know everybody's different but my biggest problem with my bottom turns was not bending my knees enough when I was dropping in so I couldn't push hard enough to make a solid turn. Once I started really concentrating on staying low form the begining everything else came a lot easier. I dont know if that would help you but It helped me a lot. Also doinr burpees but modifying them a little so its more like hopping up on a board (look them up on youtube if you've never done them.) They help me be a little more balanced when I' drop in.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
    Posts
    2,308
    A lot of good tips here... To throw in another thought, keep in mind that all boards are not created equal. Widepoint, hips, fin configs, bottom contours, flex... a bunch of different design elements play a role, too. To get the most out of your turns, you need to figure out how your board responds to changes in foot placement and pressure, leverage, etc. Trying to do the same turn on a HPSB and a retro fish just won't get everything out of the turn you expect. Some boards are meant to be put on a rail with even weight distribution between your feet. Some are meant to be turned from the back foot, and some from the front foot.

    So... try different approaches to your turns. Try shifting your feet... or your weight. See how the board responds.

    On a shortboard, I find I get the most thrust out of a bottom turn when I unweight slightly at the drop (at this point the board has a natural rocker), then compress at the bottom while put the board on a rail (setting my line for the turn), then extend through the turn (flexing the board), then unweighting again as I come out of the turn (flex return). It's not three separate motions, but a smooth, linked transition of weighting, unweighting, and weighting the board to use the flex of the board and fins to create speed.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Norfolk, VA
    Posts
    396
    Quote Originally Posted by LBCrew View Post
    A lot of good tips here... To throw in another thought, keep in mind that all boards are not created equal. Widepoint, hips, fin configs, bottom contours, flex... a bunch of different design elements play a role, too. To get the most out of your turns, you need to figure out how your board responds to changes in foot placement and pressure, leverage, etc.
    Beat me to it. This is huge!

  9. #19

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Wilmington
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    740
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    Another thing is once you get you're bottom turns consistent and you start learning carves and eventually trying snaps, you gotta go vert to get good snaps... don't focus too much about it now, but later on you'll be like "why can't I stay over my board on a snap?," and going vertical on your bottom turns gets your board directly between the lip and your center of gravity, greatly increasing the ease and effectiveness of the snap.

    Going vertical is weird at first b/c you can't really tell at first how vertical you're going (video yourself!)... so you just sorta gotta take it a step farther, you know. Once you realize it, you'll be stoked.

    But focus on you bottom turns from now. Then carves and cutbacks, and floaters.