So to those of you in the SE, this may be a lame questions. I am aware of Folly beach and everything else named FOLLY in S.C. etc...

But in many different spot locations, they refer to an actual "FOLLY" .... I.E. in HHI, it describes a break and it says "Paddle out at the folly opening... Be careful not to get sucked into the folly here, it is dangerous"....

The word FOLLY in old english means "Line of trees" and when colonists first spotted Charleston S.C. they called it "Folly because they saw such a dense tree line on the shore"....

So with all that being said, my assumption is that a "Folly" is an underwater patch of trees, wood or old tree trunks from a maritime forrest....

My second guess would be that these are man-made "Groynes", or underwater jetties that help protect from beach errosions from swinging wind swell up and down the coast... Groynes are put into place to protect errosion.... They say that Groynes are made up of rock, wood and sometimes metal... Some exposed above water, some completely submerged...

So, is a folly some sort of Groyne? Or is a folly just a natural old clump ot tree/wood that is under the ocean near shore????

Can someone please kick some knowledge to me, structurally speaking, or what exactly a "Folly" is?

Not folly beach, or the family name folly... but the term folly with regards to surfing and the ocean... Thanks...

I figure what better place to ask this question, than in a forum of guys/gals who live down there and will certainly be able to shed some light... Thanks.