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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Possible Artificail Reef?

    I'm doing a speech tomorrow for a communications class about how unsuccessful dredging beaches is and how much money we waste shooting sand onto the beach every couple years. I looked into alternatives and of course I knew about that artificial surfing reef in India which also controls beach erosion (If you haven't seen the link.. http://vimeo.com/11274816) But anyways, I was on browsing the website of the company that built it and came across this.

    http://www.asrltd.com/projects/new-jersey.php

    Was it just a plan that never happened or are they planning it? Any word on this?

  2. #2

    Chevron Reef AKA Pratte's Reef

    Don't know anything about that particular artificial reef, but this is definitely an interesting read for you.

    http://www.theaesthetic.com/NewFiles/prattes.html

    Lotsa history on this on the Left Coast, directly involving Surfrider Foundation and had an impact on surfers.

  3. #3
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    Wow... never heard of that one... sounds like a complete failure. I'm gonna pretend I didn't read that so my speech runs smoothly


    Quote Originally Posted by kidrock View Post
    Don't know anything about that particular artificial reef, but this is definitely an interesting read for you.

    http://www.theaesthetic.com/NewFiles/prattes.html

    Lotsa history on this on the Left Coast, directly involving Surfrider Foundation and had an impact on surfers.

  4. #4
    There's no funding for it and since its a private company (ASR) you need a grant from an organization such as the SEA. Don't think the government would fund it, probably too "risky". I dunno. Correct me if I'm wrong.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Lewes, DE
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    I am aware, through a contact, that there has been research by coastal managment in new jersey about the benefits of a reef in coastal erosion management. Not sure if it will come into fruition or not, but I know it has been discussed.

    I did a senior research paper on coastal erosion management, and it is pretty interesting to know how much money is spent, but of course it is a beneficial cost based on tourism dollars. There are certainly better approaches then others, for instance, sea walls can actually create more erosion rather then prevent it.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by kidrock View Post
    Don't know anything about that particular artificial reef, but this is definitely an interesting read for you.

    http://www.theaesthetic.com/NewFiles/prattes.html

    Lotsa history on this on the Left Coast, directly involving Surfrider Foundation and had an impact on surfers.
    Pratte's Reef was a complete joke. When they first dropped the sandbags I swam out to check it and couldn't believe how small and close to shore it was. I have a hard time believeing that anyone who ever surfed thought that it would work.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
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    The damage is done. Coastal development only goes one way... natural ecosystems like our dynamic shoreline are developed, and once developed, they're gone for ever. It never goes the other way... tearing up developments and re-establishing natural ecosystems. Due to dramatic and permanent development along the coastline, we have limited our options, and at this point we need to cut our losses. The best options, including reefs, are expensive and unpopular. The investments required would be huge, and there's no way we can be sure they will be effective until we make the leap and do it full on. Mini reefs do not serve as models for large scale reef systems, because when you scale the whole project up, different forces and dynamics begin to come into play.

    Read Orrin Pilkey's work... his first research was a real eye-opener, and he was totally blasted by other, more short-sighted scientists and politicians with their own agendas. We're learning now that he was right.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    I understand the artificial reef argument for surfer reasons, but the argument should be about banning construction of homes and mansions on the beach. Like making it 200 yards from the high tide mark. That would solve alot of problems, and wouldn't cost a dime. If a home within the zone is washed away you can't rebuild. This should take care of the problem in about 100 years.

    Brigantine's (NJ) south end follows a similar rule, and they have never needed beach replenishment. whilst other nearby towns have spent millions in dredging and dumping sand, brigantine's south beaches have eroded very little.

  9. #9
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    Aug 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaMook View Post
    ...the argument should be about banning construction of homes and mansions on the beach. Like making it 200 yards from the high tide mark. That would solve alot of problems, and wouldn't cost a dime. If a home within the zone is washed away you can't rebuild.
    You said it, Mook... Long Branch had the perfect opportunity to do the right thing, and blew it. They took all those properties along the beachfront and redeveloped them. They should have restored it to a natural state, extended it all the way up to 7 Prez, and focused the re-development on the other side of Ocean Ave... like down the Broadway Corridor. Instead, the Jerzification continues... when we could have been the perfect MODEL of FORWARD THINKING AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT... of what to do, and how to do it. But we bunked it...

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by DaMook View Post
    I understand the artificial reef argument for surfer reasons, but the argument should be about banning construction of homes and mansions on the beach. Like making it 200 yards from the high tide mark. That would solve alot of problems, and wouldn't cost a dime. If a home within the zone is washed away you can't rebuild. This should take care of the problem in about 100 years.

    Brigantine's (NJ) south end follows a similar rule, and they have never needed beach replenishment. whilst other nearby towns have spent millions in dredging and dumping sand, brigantine's south beaches have eroded very little.
    Okay i am not a genius but Brigantine suffers with a ton of erosion. One reason why the South end does so well is due to the One Mile Jetty, that helps a lot. If you ever checked out the other side of the jetty like inlet side there is nothing really there anymore. When i was really little that is where i used to go to the beach. There would be sand almost a quarter mile out on the inlet side now there is absolutely nothing. Another thing is on the north end of Brigantine you have the Seawall but after that you have a 2 mile stretch of wildlife area with no houses at all. That under goes so much erosion some years its huge but then others at high tide you cant even make it to the point of the island and next inlet. And instead of dredging now they are moving by dump truck a ridiculous amount of sand funded by the state due to catastrophic storm we had early i forget one it was actually from though.