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Thread: Crowded lineups

  1. #51
    crowded lineups= loose butthole

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Delaware
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    crowds are obstacle courses to me. when i drop in i yell but they dont listen so i speed past most of the time, if needed i push the nose of their board out of the way. if its really crowded i bust out my Holy board a few more holes wont hurt i just patch em up. Being a goofy footer all the regular footers get in my way anyway, they need to practice backside too.

  3. #53
    that is some classic Dora footage, Matt! Thanks for posting, I haven't seen that much Dora footage in one vid b4! One time I tried to push a bodyboarder out of a wave after he looked at me on the wave (up and riding) and dropped in right in front of me. This was down in Costa at a long left point that was working pretty well. There were plenty of waves to be had but this kid just didn't care, especially if it was a gringo on the wave :-)

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    MD - VA
    Posts
    3,721

    Expect Massive Crowds in the Water Within 18 Months

    And we think the water is crowded now ... ?
    Just wait until Nike's campaign hits full stride.


    Advertising
    Nike Tries to Enter the Niche Sports It Has Missed

    In an attempt to leave no sport unmarketed, Nike, the sports apparel manufacturer, will begin the next phase of its current “Just Do It” campaign with a focus on action sports like skateboarding, snowboarding and surfing.
    “When we looked at action sports, we saw a unique consumer segment that was underserved in terms of product innovation,” Mark G. Parker, Nike’s chief executive and president, said at a shareholder meeting in May.

    Action sports are a $390 million business for Nike, and executives hope that figure doubles over the next five years.

    Big brands that want to enter the action sports market have to contend with the somewhat insular culture of certain sports and with the athletes’ loyalty to smaller, edgier brands. For the last few years, Nike has been on a steady mission to penetrate the market by creating sub-brands like Nike 6.0 and buying smaller brands like Hurley.

    And they seem to be getting it right.

    “They did their homework,” said Bernie Baker, the former Hawaii editor at Surfer Magazine and the contest director for the Vans Triple Crown of Surfing, who cited Nike’s “relentless promotion of youth events” as one of the driving factors in the brand’s success.

    The campaign features a contest in which athletes can submit videos showing themselves in action. The videos will run on the campaign’s Facebook page, and visitors to the page will be able to vote on which video they like best.

    Winners of the contest will be chosen at the U.S. Open of Surfing, which is held in Huntington Beach, Calif., and completely owned and sponsored by Nike.

    The company has been ramping up its action sports products and branding over the last few years, most visibly with surfing and skating. In 2002, Nike acquired the Hurley brand of skateboard- and surf-oriented apparel to compete directly with brands like Quiksilver, O’Neill and Billabong. A year later, it acquired Converse, the canvas sneakers popular with skateboarders.

    Since 2009 it has sponsored the U.S. Open of Surfing, a weeklong surfing competition. This year, Nike produced a short film featuring a cast of female surfers like Malia Manuel and Monyca Byrne-Wickey called “Leave a Message.”

    The new campaign will hit an international audience as well. Broadcast spots will be shown in countries like France, Italy and Germany, and Nike will use a Chinese social media site, Renren Tudou, in addition to Facebook to show the commercial.

    Emerging markets like China, India and Brazil are estimated to represent 19 percent of overall sales for Nike, according to research by Edward Jones, and 60 percent of sales come from international markets. Matt Arnold, an analyst who covers Nike for Edward Jones, said, “To have a pair of Nikes elsewhere is a very big deal.”
    Last edited by yankee; Jun 2, 2011 at 07:03 AM.

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Long Buried Island
    Posts
    765
    Quote Originally Posted by yankee View Post
    And we think the water is crowded now ... ?
    Just wait until Nike's campaign hits full stride.


    Advertising
    Nike Tries to Enter the Niche Sports It Has Missed

    In an attempt to leave no sport unmarketed, Nike, the sports apparel manufacturer, will begin the next phase of its current “Just Do It” campaign with a focus on action sports like skateboarding, snowboarding and surfing.
    “When we looked at action sports, we saw a unique consumer segment that was underserved in terms of product innovation,” Mark G. Parker, Nike’s chief executive and president, said at a shareholder meeting in May.

    Action sports are a $390 million business for Nike, and executives hope that figure doubles over the next five years.

    Big brands that want to enter the action sports market have to contend with the somewhat insular culture of certain sports and with the athletes’ loyalty to smaller, edgier brands. For the last few years, Nike has been on a steady mission to penetrate the market by creating sub-brands like Nike 6.0 and buying smaller brands like Hurley.

    And they seem to be getting it right.

    “They did their homework,” said Bernie Baker, the former Hawaii editor at Surfer Magazine and the contest director for the Vans Triple Crown of Surfing, who cited Nike’s “relentless promotion of youth events” as one of the driving factors in the brand’s success.

    The campaign features a contest in which athletes can submit videos showing themselves in action. The videos will run on the campaign’s Facebook page, and visitors to the page will be able to vote on which video they like best.

    Winners of the contest will be chosen at the U.S. Open of Surfing, which is held in Huntington Beach, Calif., and completely owned and sponsored by Nike.

    The company has been ramping up its action sports products and branding over the last few years, most visibly with surfing and skating. In 2002, Nike acquired the Hurley brand of skateboard- and surf-oriented apparel to compete directly with brands like Quiksilver, O’Neill and Billabong. A year later, it acquired Converse, the canvas sneakers popular with skateboarders.

    Since 2009 it has sponsored the U.S. Open of Surfing, a weeklong surfing competition. This year, Nike produced a short film featuring a cast of female surfers like Malia Manuel and Monyca Byrne-Wickey called “Leave a Message.”

    The new campaign will hit an international audience as well. Broadcast spots will be shown in countries like France, Italy and Germany, and Nike will use a Chinese social media site, Renren Tudou, in addition to Facebook to show the commercial.

    Emerging markets like China, India and Brazil are estimated to represent 19 percent of overall sales for Nike, according to research by Edward Jones, and 60 percent of sales come from international markets. Matt Arnold, an analyst who covers Nike for Edward Jones, said, “To have a pair of Nikes elsewhere is a very big deal.”
    Man I love money, but I cant stand it when money infiltrates our surfing world...I glad that I was able to really enjoy surfing in my teens and 20's without the influence of hype, government projects and now this gigantic marketing scheme that will for sure create an even larger influx of posers. But in the end when the surf is large and in charge it will still just be us yearound men in the lineup...cheers!