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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Wilmington
    Posts
    45
    Images
    2

    What do you think about this alaia thing?

    I'm an alaia rider/builder and just haven't seen many others. I ride mine every session no matter what and prefer it over everything else. Even after 15 years of surfing "modern" boards, I'm totally hooked on the alaia. It's really a ton of fun, I don't get why hardly anyone rides one. It's not really harder, it's just different so it just takes some time to figure it out.

    Is it just too kooky or something? Too hard? Too expensive? Too much investment of time? I don't know... I can't figure it out. Maybe beauty is in the eye of the beholder?
    Thanks for your honest input,
    Josh
    Xylem Surfboards

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Carolina Beach
    Posts
    840
    Images
    1
    I'd like to try one out at some point but I have so much fun on my shortboards that I never want to "waste" a session trying one out, I'd rather just go out and have fun with what I already know and continue to progress on it.

    I think alaias are more popular with surfers who are content with their surfing and want to take a step back and try something different rather than go out and do the same tricks and turns they have been doing for years. For those of us that are trying to learn something new every session, we tend to just stick to what were used to/already know we enjoy.

  3. #3
    I think it might have something to do with availability as well, i would love to give it a shot but i have never even seen one for sale. or being ridden for that matter

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
    Posts
    2,307
    Around here, the average ride is about 5-10 seconds long. Most guys try to do either as many turns as possible in that short period of time, or stick it out on the nose for as long as possible. I think to get the most out of an alaia you need a longer wave. IMO, our peaky beachbreaks just don't lend themselves to that particular craft.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    12
    Kooky? Hell no. Real watermen groove on whatever's fun. I'll ride longboards, shortboards, fish, surf mats, hand planes, bodyboards, kneeboards, paipos or a piece of plywood in junky surf. But...

    Mastering a finned stand-up board is difficult; going finless is a huge leap, a radically different, slippery experience that requires the rider to relinquish a lot of control to the wave. Personally, I found it really hard, and my water time is limited, so I tend to go with the simple stoke. But I know people who have tried it and loved it. If I lived in Nicaragua, I'd be out on one of your planks every day until I got it dialed.

    One of the best aspects of wave riding is trying new things. It bums me out when surfers hate on people who aren't riding the 'correct' craft. Imgaine how much crap visionaries like Bob Simmons or George Greenough would catch today for paddling out on their freak machines. The more committed oddballs in the water, the better.

    As much as everyone *****es about crowds, kooks and crappy east coast surf, it's an exciting time for the open-minded surfer, with all the different wave riding options, and I'm stoked that people like you are pushing the envelope. I've seen your boards. They're beautiful, and obviously made with care, and everyone should try one. I wish you luck, Josh.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    the other side of the bridge
    Posts
    168
    There is something sick about watching someone ride a plank. I'd love to try, but like the others have said it may be tough with our quick rides. Obviously you're doing it though, so props! Best of luck with the business, I may be in contact to give this a whirl.

    EDIT: Also, I wanted to say that your website is really well done. The "Day One" reading in Alaia Life section is awesome, completely sucks you to the moment.
    Last edited by offshore; Jun 17, 2011 at 01:19 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    In a state of flux
    Posts
    2,976
    My personal opinion is that they are just another tool for hippies to show how throwback they are. From a practical standpoint I agree with LB. Don't think they would work too good in our waves.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Norfolk, VA
    Posts
    396
    Quote Originally Posted by aka pumpmaster View Post
    My personal opinion is that they are just another tool for hippies to show how throwback they are.
    Can't argue with that!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    12
    Or maybe they're just looking for a new experience.

    Not everyone is a poser.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Eastern Shore
    Posts
    365
    Images
    2
    I just did some research on them. The idea of having one, and the idea of getting out of the normal surf bubble is cool but the price on those shaped pieces of wood are 600 dollars.!?