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  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Atlantic City
    Posts
    43
    I help teach with a surf school in Atlantic City and I would say get her a cheap foamie that way she doesn't hurt herself as she is learning. I agree to take her out in about waist high (her waist) water and stand there with her. Have her lay on the board while you hold on to it to help keep her stable. Keep the board facing the beach. Wait for a broken wave to approach and have her paddle but still give her a push straight toward the beach. You can help her by telling her when to stand up after she has caught the wave. After she starts getting up consistently, have her paddle and catch the waves on her own. Sorry if some of this info seems redundant or stupid but this is how we teach beginners. We also go over all of the basics on the beach before taking them out. We even have them practice the pop up a few times and give them pointers. Good luck and have a great time teaching your daughter!

    Oh, and definitely take her out on a small day.

    One love.
    Last edited by Hanaebu; Aug 14, 2011 at 06:26 PM.

  2. #12
    Younger kids are MUCH easier to teach how to surf in my opinion. I think the most important thing for you to do is to reinforce her confidence and comfort in the water. That way, she won't be nervous about being farther out in the water than all the other kids her age. I recently started teaching my younger sister and girlfriend how to surf, and their fear of the ocean is making their progress slow. Also, stress what to do after she catches the wave. I forgot to tell my girlfriend not to keep her longboard in between her and the next wave when she gets off and she got rocked in the face by her 10 foot Walden. Oops haha

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Farmingdale
    Posts
    130
    Seeing that look of stoke on their face when they finally pull off their first turn is priceless. My daughter is 8 and loves riding on her softie. I still have to push her into them but she's starting to get it on her own. Perseverence and letting them go at their own pace is the key.

  4. #14
    shoot man I've been teaching my 24 year old girlfriend how to surf lately and she is such a little kook! Always cutting me off and running into me, getting stuck inside and ditching her board, paddling in peoples way haha it's pretty bad. She gets all angry when I try to tell her to hurry out of the break zone or to paddle faster. LOL pretty sad but I think she is out of my hands...

  5. #15
    you will need patience. I don't know about you but noone taught me how to surf so when my kid wanted to learn I pretty much taught him about waves on a bodyboard then threw him out there and said you are on your own. The patience is needed when they do dumbass things like paddle over the worst part of the reef (in Hawaii - I subsequently ruined a board cuz I had to paddle in after him). The mechanics are the easy part; teaching them about waves/respect/safety is the difficult part. It pays off though because there aint no better feeling then catching a good wave then watching your son (or daughter) ride the next one!!!

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by leethestud View Post
    shoot man I've been teaching my 24 year old girlfriend how to surf lately and she is such a little kook! Always cutting me off and running into me, getting stuck inside and ditching her board, paddling in peoples way haha it's pretty bad. She gets all angry when I try to tell her to hurry out of the break zone or to paddle faster. LOL pretty sad but I think she is out of my hands...
    apples dont fall far from the tree,do they? want me to teach her the stinkbug?

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    VB via PR and HI
    Posts
    231
    Quote Originally Posted by leethestud View Post
    shoot man I've been teaching my 24 year old girlfriend how to surf lately and she is such a little kook! Always cutting me off and running into me, getting stuck inside and ditching her board, paddling in peoples way haha it's pretty bad. She gets all angry when I try to tell her to hurry out of the break zone or to paddle faster. LOL pretty sad but I think she is out of my hands...
    yea but you won't get the third degree when you wanna spend a few $$ on a surf trip. She'll just tag along. Just make sure she doesn't get in the habit of you carrying her board for her. That's a hard habit to break trust me.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    VB via PR and HI
    Posts
    231
    Quote Originally Posted by smitty517 View Post
    you will need patience. I don't know about you but noone taught me how to surf so when my kid wanted to learn I pretty much taught him about waves on a bodyboard then threw him out there and said you are on your own. The patience is needed when they do dumbass things like paddle over the worst part of the reef (in Hawaii - I subsequently ruined a board cuz I had to paddle in after him). The mechanics are the easy part; teaching them about waves/respect/safety is the difficult part. It pays off though because there aint no better feeling then catching a good wave then watching your son (or daughter) ride the next one!!!
    Nowone taught me either. I struggled thru just like most of us until dropping in on a waist high wave and bottom turning and the water felt like butter underneath my feet. That was it. Would have been easier to teach her when we lived in HI. I wrecked a few boards there, myself. Stoke is on when I see her catch a solid 8 ft from the beach and rip the top off. Maybe I'm getting a little ahead of myself.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by ripturbo View Post
    apples dont fall far from the tree,do they? want me to teach her the stinkbug?
    call me a kook, offer to teach my girlfriend the "stinkbug".

    Stay classy, Ripturbo, stay classy

  10. #20

    teaching a child to surf

    the hardest thing will probably be resisting the urge to always be teaching/explaining something and reminding yourself that the most important "lesson" for kids to learn early on, is that surfing is a blast. if kids walk out of the water feeling that way after every session, all the rest will come in time, but if there's too much instruction at the beginning, it may start to feel like school, which is a drag.

    i would say to try to have one objective for each day in the water (body positioning on the board, paddling, etc.) and limit your comments to reinforcing and complimenting the child on that point, and then just make sure that it's safe and fun.