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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Inland, near DC
    Posts
    151
    Quote Originally Posted by fatoldguy View Post
    Beach replenishment, when it means simply pumping massive amounts of sand on the nearshore, seems to create as many problems as it solves. I remain convinced that there must be a way to replenish the beach in a way that mimics the natural state of a barrier island.
    The natural state of a barrier island is one that moves slowly inland. Try reading "Ribbon of Sand" by John Alexander sometime. It is about OBX, but explains barrier islands quite well. If there were no beach replenishment projects, the beachfront homes would all fall into the ocean eventually, and the land would be claimed by the ocean. Add to that the fact that the inlets also usually move in a southerly direction, most homeowners would eventually be SOL.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by billyharry View Post
    To whom it may concern,
    Now that the beaches are flat quit throwing money away pumping sand and put the money to sea-walls they last a hell of alot longer, and the beach can stay flat how it should be. Thanks,
    bill the surfer + all the people who have spine injurys due to sand pumping
    Totally agree, and the new sandbars that have formed are a beautiful thing - IMO

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Wilmington
    Posts
    2,340
    I don't know about up there, but here in NC you have to put the sand dredged from the inlets somewhere..... Of course, we have a lot of inlets.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Farmingdale
    Posts
    130
    Quote Originally Posted by Swellinfo View Post
    sea walls do not assist in coastal erosion, but can actually make it worse. The only thing a sea wall does is provide protection from ocean surge passed the wall.
    Well said and absolutely correct. They actually speed up the erosion process. The army corps has gotten away from these structures and full jetties/groins for exactly this reason. Establishing sand dunes and dune grass are the best defense in maintaining a "Flat" beach. The Wildwoods are a perfect example of this.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Erock View Post
    I don't know about up there, but here in NC you have to put the sand dredged from the inlets somewhere..... Of course, we have a lot of inlets.
    The army corp of engineers, and their infinite wisdom, was doing what you are refering to as hopper dredging at Oregon inlet for some time. Taking sand from an inlet and dumping it farther out into the continental shelf or using it to replenish a beach. The main problem with that is you cut off the sand supply for the southern portions of the island since our long shore current runs mainly North to South. The groin they put at the northern tip of pea island to hold the bonner bridge was even worse for this. It catches all that sand that would have otherwise nourished the width of the southern portions of the island, in this case Pea island. Hey low and behold look where all the breaches on 12 took place from Irene, (technically they're "inlets" but officials won't say that because Inlets require federal environmental permits if you're going to try and fill them) Stan Riggs, a coastal Geologist from ECU has been saying this for years. There are consequences to the things we try to do to "Protect" coastline...

    Eh, here's an idea, Don't build so close to the F***ing ocean...Killing off sea life through replenishment and interfering with natural processes is not worth protecting someones condo or hotel. Let her rip and let those natural outer sand bars form...
    Last edited by davincimoon; Aug 31, 2011 at 03:27 PM.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Central NJ
    Posts
    245
    Well said Davincimoon.............NSW AUS coastline is all natural, its the exact opposite of what we do here in the states. Even their inlets open and close naturally. It's an amazing coast. I reccomend it highly.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    milton delaware
    Posts
    1,400
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    262
    Quote Originally Posted by fatoldguy View Post
    Beach replenishment, when it means simply pumping massive amounts of sand on the nearshore, seems to create as many problems as it solves. I remain convinced that there must be a way to replenish the beach in a way that mimics the natural state of a barrier island.
    Actually the problem IS the natural state of a barrier island. Barrier islands are land forms that roll over themselves by storm overwash and gradually move landward and upward on the continental shelf.

    Beach nourishment is done precisely because "the natural state of a barrier island" (constant erosion and landward migration) is incompatible with immovable beach houses, roads and boardwalks.

  8. #18
    I completely understand what the natural state of a barrier island is.

    I also understand, that in places like Ocean City Maryland and coastal Delaware, where billions of dollars of construction has taken place, there is little chance that those areas will be allowed to return to their natural state.

    That is why my post said "mimics the natural state of a barrier island."

  9. #19

    Reef

    They need to genetically invent a natural reef that grows in cold water and resists pollution, and grow that b!tch all up and down the coast...

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by whosthat View Post
    Well said Davincimoon.............NSW AUS coastline is all natural, its the exact opposite of what we do here in the states. Even their inlets open and close naturally. It's an amazing coast. I reccomend it highly.
    agreed seen it myself. the superbank is an exception tho and has killed kirra