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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
    Posts
    2,303

    Beach Replenishment


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Inland, near DC
    Posts
    137
    Love the comment (copied here in case it gets nuked)
    Classic how all of the sand the Army Core of Engineers pumped into Cape May is gone less than a year later. They did the same thing in A.C. a couple months ago and the sand appears to be at least half gone already. They should just make a bon fire with the millions of tax dollars they waist replenishing sand. Hey ENGINEERS, can u say "pissing into the wind"? F##king duh.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Belford, New Jersey, United States
    Posts
    149
    Images
    1
    Great, just when I thought there would be hope to the closest break to me (sandy hook), this jerkoff pulls another great one. NJ beach replenishment rocks!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Brick Township, New Jersey, United States
    Posts
    686
    Images
    5
    every friggin year, theres always some beach that spends millions upon millions to replenish something that naturally erodes. this will never change ugh

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Two Rivers Area, NJ
    Posts
    234
    "Pissing in the wind," is the perfect way to describe it. Let's spend a boatload of money on a project that provides a very short term solution to erosion, destroys whatever remaining breaks we have, and creates extremely dangerous swimming conditions. Sounds like a win/win situation to me.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Pinelands, NJ
    Posts
    198
    Images
    10
    As long as the counties continue to take in millions in tourism revenues each year, the trend will likely continue. Our congressional reps lobby each year for millions to fund Army Corps projects like this. Now could the money be put to better use, I think so but I'm sure there are some that support it. The good news is that it only takes a year or two of noreasters and such to rip away the dredged sand and return breaks to their prior conditions. I'm seeing some spots that were dredged two years ago working better than ever thanks to Irene. Plus I'd say 13$ million is a drop in the bucket compared to what is spent to replenish Cape May Island every two years.