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  1. #51
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Wilmington
    Posts
    2,340
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZcuYjDR2tSg&feature=plcp

    Bull Shark in a creek behind Myrtle Beach

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    484
    Quote Originally Posted by Erock View Post
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZcuYjDR2tSg&feature=plcp

    Bull Shark in a creek behind Myrtle Beach
    I used to surf Folly Beach in Charleston at night, all the time! That's another story (basically I worked from 7am-8pm and had to get my fix), but one day I talked to a guy at my work about it. He was really into fishing and told me this little night surfing gig was totally insane. He invited me to go fishing with him off Folly Pier one night and told me to look down beneath the lights. Sure enough, you could see a decent-sized group of sharks just cruising around beneath the pier. It was creepy, but it was one of many events over the years that have actually lessened my fears.

    Sharks are everywhere. They have more longevity than almost any other animal on earth, and they will likely still be hear long after we're gone. In my opinion they are expert survivalists. Even with climate change and pollution that are far more severe than many other changes that have occurred throughout their history, many species are adapting nicely (see article http://www.news.com.au/technology/sc...-1226235304370). IN GENERAL sharks seem to be unconcerned with people. I have seen plenty of sharks while surfing South Carolina, Costa Rica, Panama, Hawaii and elsewhere. I nearly sh@t myself on the North Shore when a big 'ole tiger cruised by while surfing alone (yes, soul sessions do happen in Hawaii, albeit rarely). Anyhow, my point is that most of the time, they simply ignore us. Obviously, sometimes that doesn't happen, and in some places this seems to happen more often than others. I think the most important thing for us, above all else, is to try to figure out why attacks happen so that we can better avoid such circumstances in the first place. There is plenty of "common wisdom" about avoiding attacks from other predators. Here are a few examples that come to mind for me:

    1. Cornered snakes are aggressive. Back away slowly.
    2. Momma bear is protective. Stay away from the cubs.
    3. Bull sharks respond to "panicky" electrical signals like erratic heart rates.

  3. #53
    Another attack.... story says the guy lost his leg and died soon after...
    http://msn.foxsports.com/other/story...n-ocean-072312

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Carolina Beach , NC
    Posts
    96
    Quote Originally Posted by Erock View Post
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZcuYjDR2tSg&feature=plcp

    Bull Shark in a creek behind Myrtle Beach
    Wow, that was kind of exciting! At first, I was laughing at the people, but it was quite unexpected and I would have been surprised as well. Good ol' bull sharks. If I am not wrong, I think I remember reading an article that they have been found far upstream in some freshwater actually breeding....

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    3,694
    Quote Originally Posted by respecttheocean View Post
    Wow, that was kind of exciting! At first, I was laughing at the people, but it was quite unexpected and I would have been surprised as well. Good ol' bull sharks. If I am not wrong, I think I remember reading an article that they have been found far upstream in some freshwater actually breeding....
    Very common to find them in rivers, pretty far inland too

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    470
    Quote Originally Posted by respecttheocean View Post
    Wow, that was kind of exciting! At first, I was laughing at the people, but it was quite unexpected and I would have been surprised as well. Good ol' bull sharks. If I am not wrong, I think I remember reading an article that they have been found far upstream in some freshwater actually breeding....

    James River in Richmond, VA. Seen them there growing up just east of the Fall Line.

  7. #57
    Possible great white attack or bite rather on cape cod. http://www.boston.com/metrodesk/2012...ztK/story.html

  8. #58
    Last week in Monmouth County I paddled toward what I thought was a dolphin about 15 feet from me and quickly realized it wasn't! I got about 8-10 feet from it when I saw the fin was wiggling back an forth NOT flowing up and down like dolphins do. I alerted two other people near me that the shark was heading straight towards, a guy and his girlfriend, damn, I think she sh!t her shorts! It swam right next to tham, like 5-6 feet away. I've never seen someone paddle in so quickly, damn if she paddled for waves like that she'd be rocking. Don't know what kind it was but it was about the same size of an adult dolphin fin. Good thing there were tons of little fishes swimming around for it to eat. And no she didn't come back out. Made an ankle bitter day a little more interesting.

  9. #59
    First off, I hope everyone is enjoying their summer. As the season starts to wind down, it's time to take a moment and reflect on your summer slop sessions. Some of us were fortunate enough to surf with dolphins and other cool sea creatures alike. I'm sure we all enjoyed the warm water, as it was a nice gift after months of winter surfing. We are now making the transition to the next season of surfing - the water will start to cool down and some of us will take advantage of the larger swells. Regardless of the season, who is surfing around us, east, west, north, south - we need to be cautious when surfing. As the summer pros start to hibernate, there will be sessions when you're all alone. Know your limits. Be aware of your surroundings.

    Que "Jaws" music.

    http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2012...-cape-cod?lite

  10. #60
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    A State of Confusion
    Posts
    1,495
    Yeah Cape Cod area is fast becoming the South Africa of the east coast.