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  1. #11
    How can charge for a beach tag if there is no beach?

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    East Coaster
    Posts
    167
    What a damn shame! Gonna have to surf elsewhere.....

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Pinelands, NJ
    Posts
    214
    Images
    10
    I've always wondered what sense it makes to pump the sand just as we head into the winter. A good winter noreaster will remove more sand than most other storms I imagine. Wouldn't it make more sense to pump at the end of winter/early spring....

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    MB
    Posts
    10
    Yea will be dead for the next 5 years.. good thing deal hasn't pumped their beach yet

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by surfrr View Post
    I've always wondered what sense it makes to pump the sand just as we head into the winter. A good winter noreaster will remove more sand than most other storms I imagine. Wouldn't it make more sense to pump at the end of winter/early spring....
    I always figured they did it so the locals would have the winter to find all the sh** they dredge up. But I think they do it cause the water is warmer in the fall.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
    Posts
    2,573
    Quote Originally Posted by Harhar View Post
    I always figured they did it so the locals would have the winter to find all the sh** they dredge up.
    Close... They do it during the winter for two reasons: There are no tourist dollars to be made, and the muck that's stirred up, along with any toxins released by the dredging/pumping process, "won't affect anybody." Yea... that's a verbatim quote. I guess that makes us 12-month surfers "nobodies." Just goes to prove, once again, they don't care about our health and safety. They only care about liability and MONEY (which are really the same thing in the end). That's the same mentality that keeps us out of the water during a hurricane swell when the beaches are red flagged and swimmers are not allowed, yet the other 9 months out of the year they don't give a lick who drowns.
    Last edited by LBCrew; Nov 15, 2011 at 12:26 PM.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Point
    Posts
    267
    Images
    24

    Clarifing the 'Facts"

    Overall Monmouth Beach: $12,913,250.00
    Cost to Monmouth Beach: $1,129,909.375
    Monmouth Beach Volume: 800,000 cubic yards of sand from the offshore borrow area off of Sandy Hook.
    To be clear, while much of fill template is the same 9 feet by 100 feet, a section has been modified to extend further seaward and another section has been modified to allow for more exposure of a groin, both in an attempt to offset potential impacts to recreational value.
    And to clarify the "toxin" comments: sediment that is a 90% to 95% composed of sand, is physically unable to retain toxins. And while its possible that this 5% or 10% is 'muddier' or finer than sand, it is pretty clean.
    (One should worry more about what is spewing from the outfall pipes and the lakes, which we all so love to ride by.

    Overall Cape May project: $9,075,500.00
    Cost to Cape May City: $30,887.50
    Cape May Coast Guard Base volume: 620,000 cubic yards of sand from the offshore borrow area (3.40 miles off the inlet)
    Cape May City volume: 70,000 cubic yards being placed at Poverty and is being borrowed from the large beaches to the west that have accreted (To make larger or greater, as by increased growth) from the sand that has eroded over the years from the Coast Guard beaches, and is being backpassed up the beach to Poverty.
    This backpassing is being done to reuse the excess sand already in the system to add sand at Poverty, and to attempt to flatten the slope and lessen the potential dangers that a steep beach face can pose to swimmers/surfers on some of the beaches to the west.

    The price tags are different because they are using two different methodologies from obtaining the sand from the offshore borrow areas (Hopper Dredge with trailing suction arms in MB- less efficient but easier to use for the long distance borrow areas vs. the Fixed Hydraulic Cutterhead in Cape May- more efficient, esp over shorter distances)

    The reasons why it is done in the fall/winter: Environmental!! They are required by the regulatory agencies to minimize the impacts to piping plover, least terns, and black skimmers and their habitats. Believe me, the contractors and the Corps would prefer to renourish beaches in the summer: production is better thus the price tag would be better, and calm climatic conditions in the summer allow for better beach building/stabilizing giving the beaches an opportunity to 'dewater' and settle into place.

    Plus, now they are obligated to screen the intake and discharge pipes, lessening the chances of dealing with "finding all the sh** they dredge up".

    Believe me, you have surfers working for you now...Trust me on that The officials don't laugh at surfers anymore...especially rationale ones. Unfortunately, there is a federal process in most cases and it takes time to work these new ideas into effect, esp since the projects and their designs' have been authorized by congress; so proving them and changing them is not an easy thing. But they are changing...the attempt at a 'point' in Long Branch in '09, and these modifications in MB and the methodology in Cape May now are all examples.

    And while many breaks have changed do to nourishment/Corps involvement, some has been positive and some people are working to increase this positive.

  8. #18
    Bottom line- regular renourishment is NOT a sustainable coastal management strategy. It is intended to protect property, very expensive property I might add. I dare say most folks cannot afford to buy in Monmouth Beach.
    Ironically there are still many NO Trespassing signs on stairways over the seawall. What is the benefit for the
    99% I wonder? Retreat is also a reasonable coastal management tool. Seema that in NJ we never even consider that one.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Inland, near DC
    Posts
    241
    @Lumpy, thanks for the info. How do you know so much?

    We need more rational surfers. Check that, we need more of the current surfers to become rational.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
    Posts
    2,573
    Lumpy... so all the newspapers and bloggers have got it wrong about the Cape May project? Everything I've heard reported in the media has the price higher and volume lower than you state. And if it's "more efficient," why does it cost more per cubic yard? Can you clarify?

    Were you at the meeting Monday?

    What's your relationship to the project, and why hasn't the media been given accurate information? Your numbers would be "easier on the eyes" to those seeking the facts...

    http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/n...cc4c002e0.html

    http://www.dredgingtoday.com/2011/11...ts-this-month/

    ... and there are many other sources... some of them with conflicting information.

    To me, "pretty clean" raises an eyebrow... Not pointing a finger at you, but as a former journalist and newspaper editor with a Social Strategies for Environmental Protection certificate from Rutgers, but moreover, a responsible citizen, my brain is wired to ask questions, and question answers.

    The Long Branch "point" project was a failure on some levels but a success on others. I give credit to the surfers and activists who made that project what it was. But I am "incensed" (and if you are who I think you are, you know who I am now, too) that those same people berated me for being vocally critical about the implementation of the project when it was underway. And I said what I said then, and am saying what I say now, because the point I'm attempting to make is that it is up to US... meaning YOU and ME, and everyone else who pays taxes... to make sure we are getting what we are paying for.
    Last edited by LBCrew; Nov 17, 2011 at 02:13 AM.