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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by rDJ View Post
    Retreat is very feasible in many areas. How many of those beach front house do you think have people living in them year round. How many are second houses. Our states real population density is not near the beach. People flock to the beach 3 months a year. As long as access to the beach is maintained for tourism, the loss of beach front houses will go mostly unnoticed. Erosion will occur slowly over time. It's not like suddenly thousands of people will be without homes. However, there definitely are some developed areas that can and should justifiably be protected.

    Zero tax dollars should be spent to pump sand onto beaches in front of beach clubs. It's sickening what those clubs get away with during the summer. Let them pay for it with their $20k cabana memberships or let the ocean tear them down. Or better yet, force the towns to allow access for all then pump all you want.

    I'm with LBCrew on this. They need to think out of the box. There are other potential options out there that are more permanent and don't create hazardous conditions in the shorebreak. A multi-million dollar tax payer funded band-aid for beach that doesn't have public access is just insane. In the very least they should be researching ways to pump a more gradual sloping grade.

    An example of smart sand pumping that works for the sun bather, the land owner, the boater, and the surfer:
    http://www.snapperrocks.com/history.htm
    Some communities are quite year round...and again, I go back to the fact that the revenue from these properties/businesses is what keeps these towns alive. Without them, then you don't have a town. Admit it; many of us along coast are here via relocation to the coast...whether it be 1 or 2 generations ago or even more but we are here because of the coast and some of our livelihoods are derived from the livings we make due to coastal things. Yes, there are lots of commuters but the coast and its assets brought us here if we weren't already 'lifers'. That is why I think retreat is not feasible in many sections of NJ. Poor decisions long ago allowed things to be the way they are, but tourism and the communities that support tourism is a HUGE part of New Jerseys economy.

    I totally agree with you about using Snapper Rocks as an example. Unfortunately, the US is behind the times with certain aspects of that next level, sustainable beach nourishment. But backpassing is a small step in that direction. And overfilling sand 'points' to act as a feeder beach was another small step in that direction.

    And LBCrew and lbsurfer:
    Maybe reefs will come into play in time...I think it is an interesting concept that totally has potential. But the problem all comes down to the disruption and loss of sources of sand..whether it is due to jetties, groins, seawalls, development, dams on rivers upstream, channel dredging, whatever.. Waves break here because of sand and sandbars and the sands interaction with structure...if there is no sand there will be very little in the way of waves. That is why I think (IMO) that beach nourishment is the most viable method of shore protection: Its more natural and reintroduces lost sand back into the system. An artificial reef on a sand bottom is a set up for failure in most cases if the is little or no sand in the system. They will settle into water too deep for it to work correctly, and potentially fail/be useless if the sand keeps on eroding from underneath them. Plus, a lot of times these reefs that work, are working because of the interaction with the sand that supports and surrounds them.

    Now if we could combine nourishment with a reef and/or a backpass or bypass system (ie, snapper rocks), then that would be sweet..

  2. #32
    Lumpy are you suggesting casinoes, large commercial buildings, and the infastructure to support them shouldn't have been built on tidal marshes and beaches that are the buffer between thousands of miles of open ocean and the mainland? LOL

    Anyway I agree "nourishment" is the best current solution and IMO will be in the future. So buy stock in a dreding operation that gets the gov contracts and be happy (better yet start your own), there is no solution keeping the shoreline "as is" permanently. Only our own arrogance lets us believe there is a permanent solution, anything we try will be repetetive or at the least high maintenance.

  3. #33
    FYI on surf-sensitive design options..

    http://www.stevens.edu/news/content/...tal-protection

  4. #34
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    [/QUOTE] Now if we could combine nourishment with a reef and/or a backpass or bypass system (ie, snapper rocks), then that would be sweet..[/QUOTE]

    What are we are waiting for Lumpy? Tell the boys in govt and those basterds on that evil dredge to make some breaks full of hoagies and grinders!!!

  5. #35
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    Are there really waves in nj? They cant' be that good to begin with so its not like your really losing that much.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by marknel83 View Post
    Are there really waves in nj? They cant' be that good to begin with so its not like your really losing that much.
    low blow We all know, that on whole, New Jersey has better waves then Delmarva...

  7. #37
    Jersey's got the juice.

  8. #38
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    A few of the facts are a little mixed up but:
    http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/n...cc4c03286.html

  9. #39
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    Don't know why, but my last two posts on this thread never got put up, and some other posts are now gone? Maybe the Army Corps is censoring us? Ha!

    Thanks for all the great info, Lumpy... I agree that some combination of replenishment and structures will give us the best solution to the problem. But to go only half way and just pump sand is, to me, insanity at best, and destructive at worst. As I've said here before (or tried to) a well engineered reef system, based on localized studies of sand movement, and put into the context of the bigger picture along our coastline, is what would be required to slow erosion. Reduce erosion and you don't need a very big sediment source to keep a beach wide enough to offer protection, towel space, recreation, and habitat.

    I just think we can do better...

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by LBCrew View Post
    Don't know why, but my last two posts on this thread never got put up, and some other posts are now gone? Maybe the Army Corps is censoring us? Ha!

    Thanks for all the great info, Lumpy... I agree that some combination of replenishment and structures will give us the best solution to the problem. But to go only half way and just pump sand is, to me, insanity at best, and destructive at worst. As I've said here before (or tried to) a well engineered reef system, based on localized studies of sand movement, and put into the context of the bigger picture along our coastline, is what would be required to slow erosion. Reduce erosion and you don't need a very big sediment source to keep a beach wide enough to offer protection, towel space, recreation, and habitat.

    I just think we can do better...
    Cheers...

    I believe Mr. Swellinfo did an update that deleted a few posts..

    A few resources to share-

    Summary of the Coastal Geological History of New Jersey:
    http://intraweb.stockton.edu/eyos/pa...eID=3#Monmouth

    20 year report documenting the erosion and accretion along the New Jersey coast:
    http://intraweb.stockton.edu/eyos/pa...149&pageID=126

    15 year report documenting the erosion and accretion along the New Jersey coast:
    http://www.gannet.stockton.edu/crc/15__yr_report.htm