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Thread: Surf rage

  1. #1

    Surf rage

    Was in Barbados a couple years ago. Freights was breaking decent. Left hand which can give long rides & dies in front of what is basically a cliff wall. Usually a mellow crowd, including many locals teaching classes, but also draws many decent surfers from 'town' who may not have time to haul up to Soup Bowl or Brandon's & the rest of it.

    So, my buddy gets up on a nice wave which is sort of wrapping around to the left. Problem is, because of the odd wrap-around bend effect of the wave, buddy doesn't see the guy booming down on him from his right, from back around the bend, 'cause buddy is intently looking to the left as he rides.

    Bang, bump, they both go flying as the guy doesn't flinch & slams into buddy. Their boards collide.

    The guy comes up absolutely seething. Screaming (literally) at my buddy to get the hell out of the water, this is his break, calling buddy names, paddling furiously over towards buddy who's sitting on his board & continuing to scream at buddy. Buddy is sincerely apologizing over & over to the guy, telling him he didn't see him, it was buddy's mistake, et. al.

    The guy doesn't care & the guy doesn't STF up. Gets really close to buddy.

    Keeps screaming, in a French accent, to get the f*** out of the water, this is his break, respect the locals, leave now.

    The French accent killed it for me. I mean, we're in Barbados, dude, on one of the most crowded breaks & this was clearly a screw-up by buddy & buddy has apologized 20x over.

    So, I'm watching & enough is enough. I paddle over & look at the guy & say, sotto voce, no one's leaving the water, buddy apologized for his mistake, he's no rookie & he's no kook, he just totally eff'd up, you need to let it go & let's all get back to enjoying the surf. This isn't why anyone's out here. The guy stares at me for a couple seconds, then paddles off still steaming & spewing invectives.

    15 mins later the guy makes a point of paddling over to buddy & apologizing for his comments, saying he has a bad temper & he understands that mistakes happen. The guy looks at me & just nods as he paddles off. All in all, a decent ending to a pretty f'ed up mistake by my buddy. Could have been a lot worse.

    Of course, the rest of the trip I would say things to buddy like get the hello out of my rental car, and this is my island, you kook, so you pay the bill for these Banks beers..... of course, right ...?

    So what's your surf rage saga ?
    Last edited by snakepliskin; Nov 15, 2011 at 03:43 AM.

  2. #2
    I admit to raging on occasion. Mostly when it has been a real flat summer and I just want to get some rides but kooks just overpopulate the lineup with SUPs and get in the way

  3. #3
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    i dont understand raging if the guy apologizes (sincerely) and it was a one time thing. it just doesnt make sense. now if someone cut me off and then didnt say a word, then i would shout over to him to watch it next time. if they do something more than once, then im gonna let em know and probably tell them to move down the shore or something, but no rage still. 3 times? then youve got a problem because its probably on purpose.

    i just dont feel like 1 wave is worth all that trouble and nonsense. you arent surfing a world-class break and you two arent pros; relax and enjoy it. sometimes they make genuine mistakes and need direction. its until they are ruining the day for me that, i rage (and even then i just get pissed off and tell them to get the hell out of our area).

  4. Guy dropped in on me consistently for 2 years. They called him Kamikakee Pete. I finally spoke my mind a couple weeks before. Then the next time we surfed together he did it again in a dangerous spot. Really gave it to him verbally. Next day I was in the barrel and he dropped in on me! I ate it on purpose in order not to eat his fins and we came up tangled together. I no longer said anything as I was holding his head underwater. I figured if he was going to try to kill me, I would return the favor. We got separated by guys in the water and took it on to the reef. I punched him once split his eye open and he went to hospital. NEVER DROPPED IN ON ME AGAIN.
    Everyone has their line... after 2 years and nearly killing me more times than I could count he found mine.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by LegendJim View Post
    Guy dropped in on me consistently for 2 years. They called him Kamikakee Pete. I finally spoke my mind a couple weeks before. Then the next time we surfed together he did it again in a dangerous spot. Really gave it to him verbally. Next day I was in the barrel and he dropped in on me! I ate it on purpose in order not to eat his fins and we came up tangled together. I no longer said anything as I was holding his head underwater. I figured if he was going to try to kill me, I would return the favor. We got separated by guys in the water and took it on to the reef. I punched him once split his eye open and he went to hospital. NEVER DROPPED IN ON ME AGAIN.
    Everyone has their line... after 2 years and nearly killing me more times than I could count he found mine.
    Yeah, habitually dropping in on someone (especially on good/dangerous waves) goes way beyond normal disrespect... It crosses over into disregard to everyone's safety and property in the water, and I can see where a punch can be deserved. Luckily I've never been in a position where the person didn't quickly apologize (or the other way around), but if someone caused me to get hurt or take a chunk out of my board, I'd be more than willing to square off with them on the beach.

  6. I have been on both ends of surf rage over the past few years. I was working in Manhattan and living in the Rockaways from mid 2009 till mid 2011. The lineups are infested with kooks who are completely unfamiliar with surf etiquette. I was dropped in on, had boards ditched at me, and had people take off on top of me with no control of the board and no chance to make drops. When I felt that people would endanger me in the lineup, I typically reacted with 5 minute verbal tirades. On occasion it resulted in some jarring on the beach, but never anything too physical.

    My reaction may not have been the best, but it seemed to work. I often saw people I had chewed out in the lineup later on being respectful and giving me a friendly wave when both checking the surf. In cases where people violate surf etiquette b/c they simply don't know the rules, I think regulating is the right thing to do b/c it will make the lineup safer and can even breed people into \"locals\" who regulate a spot rather than make it dangerous.

    I have since moved to Ocean City, NJ as I no longer had work in the big city. I have since been on the receiving end of \"surf rage.\" It turns out that a few older locals, whose surfing ability is mediocre at best, think they own surf spots because they have surfed them the longest. I first learned this when paddling out at a certain spot on the north end of the island on a chest high day. I got dropped in on by the same local about 4 times. I wasn't hassling him, nor had I disrespected anyone, and I took the drop ins silently. Finally I got fed up and decided to race him down the line. I caught him about 30 yards down the line and as i passed him, he grabbed my leash and we both went down. He started yelling about how this spot was not a \"democracy\" (I think he meant meritocracy) and demanded to know my name and where i was from. I told him it was none of his business and he came at me and slapped me in the face. I was taken aback, and decided to just paddle back towards the peak. He hasn't dropped in on me since.

    I had a similar altercation surfing the same spot with a friend of mine. A different older local dropped in on my friend, and my friend hollered, letting him know he was there. The older local did not cede the wave, and on the way back to the lineup started talking smack, telling my friend to shut his mouth and that it was HIS Jetty. Being in earshot, I calmly told him that he snaked my friend and he has no reason to complain. The local told me it was his jetty and I should go home. He then paddled right up next to me and sat there. Then a wave came and I got shacked off my gord. He doesn't drop in on me or my buddy anymore.

    I think the the lesson of this all is that regulating when people don't know any better might make you look like an ass, but it actually does keep things safer. When old entrenched locals try to intimidate people out of the water, and claim the waves are \"theirs\" even though they don't want to work for it, it's important to just stand up for yourself. Those guys are typically cowards and don't want to actually fight. They're just looking for a way to pad their waning egos. The cream will always rise to the top.
    Last edited by stayabovetheweather; Nov 15, 2011 at 02:56 PM. Reason: format

  7. #7
    trying to regulate 90th in rockaway is like throwing a cup of water on a forrest fire.

  8. #8
    One time when I was in the water I noticed a couple of kids no older than 14 surfing. and one of the groms dropped in on an older dude by mistake knocking the guy off his board. the older man in his 20's decided to get in this kids face and the kid look liked he was about to cry. I paddled over there and told the older dude to chill out. the older dude than began to take the kids board (still on leashe) and walk the kid to the beach yelling the whole time. Later did that dude know was the groms older brother was on the beach just got back from Marines and punched the dude right out. kid went back surfing and older guy was never seen since. it was awesome

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by stayabovetheweather View Post
    I have been on both ends of surf rage over the past few years. I was working in Manhattan and living in the Rockaways from mid 2009 till mid 2011. The lineups are infested with kooks who are completely unfamiliar with surf etiquette. I was dropped in on, had boards ditched at me, and had people take off on top of me with no control of the board and no chance to make drops. When I felt that people would endanger me in the lineup, I typically reacted with 5 minute verbal tirades. On occasion it resulted in some jarring on the beach, but never anything too physical.

    My reaction may not have been the best, but it seemed to work. I often saw people I had chewed out in the lineup later on being respectful and giving me a friendly wave when both checking the surf. In cases where people violate surf etiquette b/c they simply don't know the rules, I think regulating is the right thing to do b/c it will make the lineup safer and can even breed people into \"locals\" who regulate a spot rather than make it dangerous.

    I have since moved to Ocean City, NJ as I no longer had work in the big city. I have since been on the receiving end of \"surf rage.\" It turns out that a few older locals, whose surfing ability is mediocre at best, think they own surf spots because they have surfed them the longest. I first learned this when paddling out at a certain spot on the north end of the island on a chest high day. I got dropped in on by the same local about 4 times. I wasn't hassling him, nor had I disrespected anyone, and I took the drop ins silently. Finally I got fed up and decided to race him down the line. I caught him about 30 yards down the line and as i passed him, he grabbed my leash and we both went down. He started yelling about how this spot was not a \"democracy\" (I think he meant meritocracy) and demanded to know my name and where i was from. I told him it was none of his business and he came at me and slapped me in the face. I was taken aback, and decided to just paddle back towards the peak. He hasn't dropped in on me since.

    I had a similar altercation surfing the same spot with a friend of mine. A different older local dropped in on my friend, and my friend hollered, letting him know he was there. The older local did not cede the wave, and on the way back to the lineup started talking smack, telling my friend to shut his mouth and that it was HIS Jetty. Being in earshot, I calmly told him that he snaked my friend and he has no reason to complain. The local told me it was his jetty and I should go home. He then paddled right up next to me and sat there. Then a wave came and I got shacked off my gord. He doesn't drop in on me or my buddy anymore.

    I think the the lesson of this all is that regulating when people don't know any better might make you look like an ass, but it actually does keep things safer. When old entrenched locals try to intimidate people out of the water, and claim the waves are \"theirs\" even though they don't want to work for it, it's important to just stand up for yourself. Those guys are typically cowards and don't want to actually fight. They're just looking for a way to pad their waning egos. The cream will always rise to the top.
    Sounds like Waverly. Dont understand why EVERYONE on the island surfs there.....and all who do have some kind of rage issue...

  10. Quote Originally Posted by MFitz73 View Post
    trying to regulate 90th in rockaway is like throwing a cup of water on a forrest fire.
    So true. I rarely surfed 90th, only on big days when the drift kept the kooks off the peak. The spots in the 60s are better anyway when it's less than 6ft.