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Thread: hang time

  1. #1

    hang time

    I got a 9'2 board that I love and I use most frequently. I also like surfing vintage style surfboards as well. I was looking at the Matador Squid(holmsley sidewinder) with the scooped tail at the end. Does this scooped deck technology really help to make noseriding easier or is it just a novelty to sell more boards. I can noseride on my board but I want something that is a little easier and more stable. I have never seen or used one of these boards. Is this a board viable option to help with more hangtime?

  2. #2
    I don't have any experience with a Squid, but I definitely wouldn't be interested in owning a board that looks like that! If the look doesn't bother you, find one to take for a test spin. I'm sure the shop (Brighton Beach) that sells Matador boards has a demo that you can try...

    http://brightonbeachsurfshop.com/pag...ge&category=24

  3. #3
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    the scooped deck helps cut down swing weight. so yes it does help in some sense.

  4. #4
    the squid tail is designed to funnel more water over the back of the board to help with nose riding... but I wouldnt be so sure its worth it. also, tumbling around in the washer machine with an extra set of edges like that coming at you... I'll pass.

  5. #5
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    I haven't spent any time on a board like that... but in theory it should help, having the tail stick is critical. I have noticed that a bigger nose width helps more then anything- BUT over all -it comes down to technique... technique... and of coarse nose time: the amount of hours you put in on your nose...
    Its an interesting design- if your into vintage boards I would go for it- specially if its the yellow 9'6 thats for sale- nice condition and shape! But on the other hand- if the design was so good- why didn't stay around from when it was introduced in 67? Still- i think thats its worth getting- you might find yourself getting more hang time!

    http://matadorsurfboards.com/page/1eelq/Home.html

  6. #6
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    I concave the deck of my noseriders slightly to facilitate the flow of water over the tail, rather than releasing it from the rail. The idea, obviously, is that water flowing over the tail helps hold the tail down and in. But keep in mind that the entire rail has to facilitate water wrapping around the rail... it's the water [I]forward[I] of the tail that ends up over the tail, not the water along the tail. So rail shape and foil from the widepoint back has a lot to do with how well any concave or channel on the tail function.

    Another trick... big, heavy tail blocks. Rather than balsa, basswood, red cedar... I like to use oak, cherry, beech... the heavier and denser, the better. You can usually stop in at a flooring place and ask for samples to "take home and match up with your furniture" or whatever. They'll give you some offcuts of beautiful wood that make excellent tail blocks.
    Last edited by LBCrew; Mar 1, 2012 at 05:14 PM.

  7. #7
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    Historically- Sidewinders created a lot of buzz when they came out in the early 70's, but while they did nose-ride well, they tended to track too much making anything other than a straight line difficult at best. It's probably the reason they didn't last and no other board manufacturer bothered with the design. Not unlike a Rick flex tail, step-decks, horizontal fin stabilizers, hatchet fins, finger fins, Con's Ugly, or a host of other design concepts ad nauseum. Master the board, don't let the board master the rider.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by MDSurfer View Post
    Historically- Sidewinders created a lot of buzz when they came out in the early 70's, but while they did nose-ride well, they tended to track too much making anything other than a straight line difficult at best. It's probably the reason they didn't last and no other board manufacturer bothered with the design. Not unlike a Rick flex tail, step-decks, horizontal fin stabilizers, hatchet fins, finger fins, Con's Ugly, or a host of other design concepts ad nauseum. Master the board, don't let the board master the rider.
    Well said, that was the answer I was looking for