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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    VA BEACH
    Posts
    1,348
    Images
    23
    I think it really depends on what you want to surf. Just because you want to learn to surf, doesn't mean you ultimately need to surf a short board. I personally started out ona longboard, progressed shorter and went back to longboarding because I like it more. It is really your own personal preference. If you want to surf only shortboards in the future, start shorter. My brother did that and surfs a shortboard fairly well, yet he is clueless and intimidated by longboards which is silly.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    East of AC
    Posts
    74
    I'm about your weight but shorter and my boards go from 6'5'' - 9'8''. I suggest going with a 7'8" fun board. I would start there,then decide if you want to go with a shortboard or maybe a longboard. One thing I would stay away from is big guy shortboards. All the ones I've tried were way to thick and wide. They turned like crap and just feel like junk.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by super fish View Post
    I think it really depends on what you want to surf. Just because you want to learn to surf, doesn't mean you ultimately need to surf a short board. I personally started out ona longboard, progressed shorter and went back to longboarding because I like it more. It is really your own personal preference. If you want to surf only shortboards in the future, start shorter. My brother did that and surfs a shortboard fairly well, yet he is clueless and intimidated by longboards which is silly.
    I agree with what you're saying, although I don't know if there is too much of a point in worrying about what he might want to do in the future (with surfing). I rode only longboards for the first couple years I surfed (was sure that was what I wanted to do), then became obsessed with tiny shortboards. Now I think I found my perfect place/the best of both worlds - weird retro shapes (closer to shortboards, just a little more volume than the rip/shred/narly/radical potato chip boards).
    I'd say get a funboard and learn the basics, don't get too carried away with wanting a short board too quick - it might come back to haunt you.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Crystal Coast,N.C.
    Posts
    399
    Images
    24
    I'm your hieght and weight and you should listen to the foam is your friend comments. The more waves you catch the more you'll like surfing and you just arent going to do it starting on a shortboard. Ultimately yes.... the longboard will catch more waves than anything but if you are bent on starting smaller then I like to reccomend a round nose fish. The board pictured below is 6'8 x 21.5 x 2.75. It has a full outline and boxier rails and easily floats a 250 lb person. The tail is cut down and will turn much like a shortboard but it's a very stable platform for a noob like yourself. Get a custom made stick and you'll get exactly want you want and it will cost you less than buying from a shop. Remember you're a big guy and you need more glass under you than what a shop board has to offer. Hope this helps you out.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
    Posts
    2,441
    Solid advice from Mitchell... If you've already decided to learn on a shortboard, and not a longboard, then get a hybrid or eggy type board. 7'+ is about right, too, but don't go longer than 7'6. If you don't know a local shaper, Challenger makes several models. The CI M13 or the CI Waterhog... an example of an eggier style hybrid... are also options, but the M13 is for bigger surf than you'll see in the summer outside of tropical swells.

    You want something that looks like this: http://www.wavejammer.com/surf/brds/shortbd095.shtml

    or this: http://www.wavejammer.com/surf/brds/shortbd052.shtml

    You'll learn quickly that muscle isn't everything when it comes to catching waves. Position, timing, glide, and adjusting on the fly. You don't need a log to do that if you dedicate yourself and start with a board that floats you well.
    Last edited by LBCrew; Mar 11, 2012 at 05:41 PM.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    15
    Try a biscuit for your first board, they are expensive but worth it. Im starting out on a 7'2'' Channel Island biscuit, it has alot of foam and floats my fattass and is easier to stand up on than a shorter board. I have a 6'2'' Tuflite Biscuit as well, that is harder to learn on but will be my stepdown board. Go big! And Go thick too! My 7'2'' board is 3 1/8 inches thick.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Annapolis
    Posts
    146
    I can see that you're from Jersey, so i'm not familiar with the shops there, but I'd suggest going to a shop and talking with some knowlegeable guys there - they know about the breaks and which boards word best for them, and you can tell them the type of surfing you're interested in - old school (longer lines, longer boards) or modern styles (shorter boards, more maneuverable for cutbacks, quick turns, etc.) but MOST OF ALL - get a used board!!! It's cheaper, you could get better quality for $ than an expensive new board that you're going to grow out of (as you inprove!) Good luck!

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Daytona Beach
    Posts
    19
    First off don't purchase a board, try renting first. A longboard, shortboard for a hour or more and then decide what you want to buy first. You will need at least a couple of different sizes boards for the variable conditions of the surf we get on the east coast along with the tide changes affecting the wave conditions. I'm 151 lb and have no more trouble turning a 9 ft longboard than a 6' 8" surfboard. You will ride a longboard more than a shortboard on the east coast. All i can say is, if you surf and have never surfed a longboard your missing a completely different type of surfing expierence. HANG TEN!!!

  9. #19
    surf em all! Longboards, shortboards, hybrids, and everything you can get your hands on. One of the comments above that mentioned getting started on a funboard if you have you mind made up to surf shortboards. That comment stuck with me.

    I started on a longboard, and I love surfing longboards, but found that I enjoy surfing off the tail much more than noseriding and stepping up and down the board. I have to wonder perhaps if I had started on a funboard perhaps I would have progressed faster in the style of surfing I enjoy the most. Who knows, you have to accrue some time and experience in the water to know what you really like.

    I know I weighed in already, and hope that you find this advice useful, but no matter what you do, make sure you get a really floaty board for your first. Also be sure to try longboarding and shortboarding because they all have their place given the conditions and the wave type that you're surfing and I believe that each type of board you ride teaches you something and makes you a better all around surfer.

    One word of warning before you get started. Make sure you are ready to partake on the most rewarding, frustrating, fun, disappointing, fulfilling, and addicting activity ever. If you get bit by the bug, you will never be the same.

  10. #20
    Go to your local shop and see how many used longboards they have than look at the number of shortboards.
    Ask why are there so few used longboards for sale. Good surfers have a longboard in their quiver. Ask why?
    It's easier to learn, paddle, and catch waves on a longboard and here on the right coast we generally have more
    days when you can surf if you have a longboard available to you. Learn on a longboard and once you feel
    more competent and able get a shortboard. Please learn appropriate behavior in the water irrespective of what type of board you buy.