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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Wilmington
    Posts
    2,328
    LBCrew
    Dry sanding or wet sanding?

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
    Posts
    2,311
    Wet... only because the higher grits work better that way. Otherwise, the dust will cake up under your pad and you'll be wasting your time.

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by GoodVibes View Post
    Yo Bra,Its all about the comb.Cut the bollisticks G-Money.
    Sure thing Mr. Good Vibes. What does "bollisticks" mean?

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Tinton Falls
    Posts
    1,135
    Quote Originally Posted by FROSTEELOX View Post
    Sure thing Mr. Good Vibes. What does "bollisticks" mean?
    What up Frosty? Ballisticks:is the science of mechanics that deals with the flight,behavior,and effects of projectlies,especially bullets. Hope this helps. peace

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by GoodVibes View Post
    What up Frosty? Ballisticks:is the science of mechanics that deals with the flight,behavior,and effects of projectlies,especially bullets. Hope this helps. peace
    Ohhh, you mean Ballistics! When you typed Bollisticks, and then Ballisticks, I have to admit, I was a bit confused. I'm glad you didn't have to try for a third time! Now I get it. Phew. I thought you were picking on me. My bad.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Davy Jones' Locker
    Posts
    1,384
    Images
    64
    Quote Originally Posted by LBCrew View Post
    Yes... research has shown that the surface texture left by 400 grit sandpaper makes the most efficient surface in terms of boundary layer thickness and reduced friction drag. But the sanding strokes have to be nose-to-tail, which form grooves similar to the "riblets" found on the bottom of some racing sailboats and aircraft. As board builders, this is all we can do without going high-tech. Keep in mind that most water does not flow nose-to-tail perfectly parallel to the stringer. It flows at some angle across the bottom, which would be at an angle across the abrasions.
    Yeah, I agree the tricky part would be getting the bottom contours correct, V-shape, double, single, ect.... The grooves would need to compliment the shape, otherwise it going against the grain. Also, it should be noted that these grooves will be gone after roughly 50 hours of surfing due to salt/sand abrasion. I have never surfed a board with grooves sanded in the hotcoat, therefore I cannot speak on it's noticeable performance. But, now I am curious.