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  1. #21
    ok, lets see if you pass the litmus test.

    Where do you go surfing? Is it at a more crowded / popular spot?

    Surf in the winter? Are you a "local" anywhere?

    After you catch a wave, and there are others in the line-up, what do you do?

    Can you turn that thing? Can you even feel the ocean through that 5" of composite decking?

    Could you slam on brakes or turn direction in an instant? If you have to bail, what do you do? Simply stepping off the back and hoping the leash works out is a good way to take someones head off, is my point. If I let my short board get away from me it only weighs like 8 pounds. Your SUP weighs 40.

    And the crummy short boarders are only fooling themselves, they actually don't get any waves. All sup riders get waves, the ones that can pull an evasive maneuver and the ones that will yard sale all over everyone.

    stereotypes are based on reality. It does suck that the masses have ruined it for you, but hey, you could always get a nice meaty retro shorty that will paddle a bit easier, life's not over yet!
    Last edited by leethestud; Apr 4, 2012 at 08:31 PM.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    in the grace of the most holy FSM
    Posts
    3,272
    Quote Originally Posted by DawnPatrolSUP View Post
    Same can be said for short boarders man (and I am one as well). They're are just as many if not MORE idiots / kooks on short boards in the lineup as there are loggers or SUP surfers. My point of this whole post is that it's not the board / equipment one uses, but their level of skill and etiquette used while in the lineup.
    you may be right, but kook/incompetent shortboarders tend to self-regulate. they can't catch waves, & just drift around the line-up, like so many buoys. idiots on longboards &/or SUPs catch more waves by virtue of their larger equipment...the same equipment that makes them more likely to harm another surfer.
    & not to come off as a ****, but you really can't claim to be a shortboarder in the modern sense...you said yourself that your smallest board is a 6'10" fish. unless you're 6'2" & 225+lbs, that's not a shortboard. that's the size fish my 66 year old, 220lb, 1 knee replaced father rides.
    you imply that pre-judging is a bad thing; i say it saves time. if you identify the people you can count on to not really catch waves or blow waves, you can up your wave count considerably. 9 times out of 10, those people are easily identifiable. after over 20 years of surfing, i've found that kooks have a pretty distinct appearance.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,306
    Quote Originally Posted by leethestud View Post
    ok, lets see if you pass the litmus test.

    Where do you go surfing? Is it at a more crowded / popular spot?

    Surf in the winter? Are you a "local" anywhere?

    After you catch a wave, and there are others in the line-up, what do you do?

    Can you turn that thing? Can you even feel the ocean through that 5" of composite decking?

    Could you slam on brakes or turn direction in an instant? If you have to bail, what do you do? Simply stepping off the back and hoping the leash works out is a good way to take someones head off, is my point. If I let my short board get away from me it only weighs like 8 pounds. Your SUP weighs 40.

    And the crummy short boarders are only fooling themselves, they actually don't get any waves. All sup riders get waves, the ones that can pull an evasive maneuver and the ones that will yard sale all over everyone.

    stereotypes are based on reality. It does suck that the masses have ruined it for you, but hey, you could always get a nice meaty retro shorty that will paddle a bit easier, life's not over yet!
    Lee you've made some very good and helpful posts in the past and have given me lots of helpful information about going to PR and what not so i won't hold this one against you. You sir are expressing the very attitude i'm referring to and hence the reason for my post in the 1st place. Litmus test? C'mon, you could give a guy a little more respect than that...

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,306
    Quote Originally Posted by njsurfer42 View Post
    you may be right, but kook/incompetent shortboarders tend to self-regulate. they can't catch waves, & just drift around the line-up, like so many buoys. idiots on longboards &/or SUPs catch more waves by virtue of their larger equipment...the same equipment that makes them more likely to harm another surfer.
    & not to come off as a ****, but you really can't claim to be a shortboarder in the modern sense...you said yourself that your smallest board is a 6'10" fish. unless you're 6'2" & 225+lbs, that's not a shortboard. that's the size fish my 66 year old, 220lb, 1 knee replaced father rides.
    you imply that pre-judging is a bad thing; i say it saves time. if you identify the people you can count on to not really catch waves or blow waves, you can up your wave count considerably. 9 times out of 10, those people are easily identifiable. after over 20 years of surfing, i've found that kooks have a pretty distinct appearance.
    If you read my entire post you would understand why i ride what i ride. My definition of short board and yours are obviously two different things, but to each their own right?

  5. #25
    IN CONCLUSION: ride what ever you want, as long as you rip. ripping=respect

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,306
    Quote Originally Posted by staystoked View Post
    IN CONCLUSION: ride what ever you want, as long as you rip. ripping=respect
    Thank you staystoked, very well said, and I couldn't agree more. All the other pretentious BS means S***

  7. #27

    SUP, LB, SB Question

    My opinion on this subject:

    I can understand longboarding due to a shoulder injury or when getting back in shape. I have had to do it. If not injured, the goal should be to short board in good waves. That is the most challenging. Being on the East Coast, it is crucial to travel. When you get in really good waves, long boards can get unfunctional and you can get cleaned up big time. If you get too heavy, you have to find a way to slim down to be able to short board. As you age, you have got to do more to maintain short boarding conditioning, physically.

    from leethestud
    "I have surfed with people who call sets, catch one, and paddle on down to the next sand bar"

    I agree with this. Longboarders should give others a "break" by not hogging waves and try to keep some space between them and the pack because you can kill someone (it is hard to duck dive and turn, DawnPatrolSUP) I will do this if I am on a big board and at a beach break, especially. This doesn't apply to Big Wave Dave because it is fun to have him around. Also, when it is so small that short boarding is basically unfunctional, longboards are fine. It is better than nothing.


    from aka pumpmaster
    "My personal opinion on SUPs is that they could be great for exercise on flat days but I'd rather not see them in the lineup."

    I agree with this. Sup ing is not surfing especially on the East Coast. It is for Flat Water only. Even with shoulder injury, shouldn't do it in the surf.

    This is how I feel and I have been surfing for 31 yrs and have done at least 31 trips out of the country for surfing.

  8. #28
    So after having my ups and downs with the Fish, mostly due to my shoulder issues and fitness level at the time, I decided to start looking at long boards

    You brought up the topic and asked the question.......

    Sounds to me like you started getting older/outta shape and just went the "upsize the board route" and then just kept going to a SUP (Wow a BIG board AND a paddle). My personal opinion is that a SUP is 1 blade away from a jet ski and is closer to kayaking than surfing. Long boards are one thing, SUPs are something totally different. I tend to see the guys ridings SUPs as guys who see them as a way to get more waves, not as a way to "rip harder". 1 of the biggest rushes I get in surfing is the take off, going from an almost stand still, lying prone, to standing upright and accelerating down the face, the steeper the better. This is completely missing in riding a SUP -you are standing up the whole time.


    I am always curious when people say "shoulder issues" did you get a diagnosis? Is it actually painful or does it get sore afterwards? Is it something that can be corrected through PT or surgery? A guy I have surfed with for the last 25 years had to have one of his repaired about 10 years ago due to repetitive motion stuff, surfing, playing 3rd base for years - SOB swims at least a mile a day and can paddle for hours - he is 51.

    Jim

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by DawnPatrolSUP View Post
    Same can be said for short boarders man (and I am one as well). They're are just as many if not MORE idiots / kooks on short boards in the lineup as there are loggers or SUP surfers. My point of this whole post is that it's not the board / equipment one uses, but their level of skill and etiquette used while in the lineup. I can empathize with you from the stand point that you have had numerous negative encounters just as I have, only difference is I don't PRE-JUDGE anybody for what board they bring to the water, i let their actions speak for them. You may be right about some dudes on an SUP or Log, but you couldn't be more wrong if you were referring to me or others like me.
    I've seen you in action, and on action alone I judge. You're a kook no matter what you choose to ride, kook.

  10. #30
    and I reiterate, KOOK