Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 37
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    in the grace of the most holy FSM
    Posts
    3,559
    mitchells photos are "fun sized". there's nothing big about those waves...yea, the 20mph wind would suck, but i think people need to work on their paddling skills rather than jump onto a crutch at the first sign of adversity. a higher volumed, wide point forward board of some sort would be perfect for those conditions...get in early & haul ass.

    dave, if those are the sort of conditions you're talking about, i still don't see how big long period calls for a log. (mitchell's board also doesn't sound like a log. more of an hplb, but i guess that's splitting hairs).

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    milton delaware
    Posts
    2,453
    Images
    272
    Njsurfer
    I agree...wide point forward...solid paddler...paddle your ass off and get the board hauling ass down the line from the minute you start the angled takeoff.

    I've tried shaping three 7-0s for those conditions and I think the one I've got now is the best...basically a speed egg.

    But I also agree with Dave that under certain long period conditions its just so racy, and requires getting so early to set up the first long fast section, that a 9 footer just feels like the perfect tool for the conditions, at least to me, and yeah in 5 mm rubber, 20 MPH offshores, 40 degree water, and middle age maybe a crutch isn't off the mark. And yeah thats a relatively thin and rockered out long board. Im a small guy and really do only ride it in hollow conditions..

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    in the grace of the most holy FSM
    Posts
    3,559
    Quote Originally Posted by mitchell View Post
    I've tried shaping three 7-0s for those conditions and I think the one I've got now is the best...basically a speed egg.
    eggs are great for hauling ass in a straight line. have you tried a bonzer? lots of hold & fast as hell. great in walled up beach break...i've made sections on mine that i never thought possible. a couple conversations w/ brian wynn have got me seriously considering a twinzer, too...he swears by them.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
    Posts
    3,977
    All longboards are not created equal.

    I've ridden longboards in big surf... in fact broken several. Some work and some just don't. Mitchell is right about rocker... rocker is key. A good hplb will handle big surf quite well under the feet of a competent surfer. An old school noserider? Good luck.

    My current board for the heaviest surf we get is a 7'0 rounded pin built specifically for making those fast, barely makeable East Coast bombs that come with 10'+ @ 10sec+. Natural rocker, wide point at center, vee in the entry, to flat, to deep double concaved vee pushed forward, to vee out the back. Slightly domed deck with medium modern rails. Thruster.

    The bonzer concept is valid as well. In fact, even quads work great in big, fast, down-the-line surf, too. Prior to the 7'0 I just mentioned, I did a quad version of the same board, but with subtler concaves. Worked really good until it got destroyed.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    in the grace of the most holy FSM
    Posts
    3,559
    Quote Originally Posted by zaGaffer View Post
    Never ridden' a Bonzer, but I've always wanted to. Aussies sure do make a fun looking surfboard.
    the only thing australian about the bonzer is its name. the design was created in oxnard, ca.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    milton delaware
    Posts
    2,453
    Images
    272
    one more thing about longboards in big (ish) waves. I went to el Salvador last month and for the entire 8 days the set waves ranged from head high to well overhead/approaching DOH.

    I brought two 6'2"s expecting mostly shoulder high based on the forecasts before we left which undercalled. The 6'2" was all i rode. The points were so perfect and pristine that padding a 6'2" into well overhead waves was way easier than our local beachbreaks woudl have been even a couple feet smaller.

    One day after surfing all morning we noticed it was pretty empty out front mid afternoon and paddled out on some longboards that the place we stayed had sitting around. The one i used a big thick 9'4" Yater. What a RUSH paddling a big log down a nice long steep drop and out onto 200 yards of 8 foot+ face. Crazy Fun! Everyone should try it before they decide logs are only for ankle-waist high waves. They are mad fun in the right overhead conditions. At least i think so.
    Last edited by mitchell; May 31, 2012 at 01:33 PM.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Charleston
    Posts
    1,989
    Images
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by mitchell View Post
    one more thing about longboards in big (ish) waves. I went to el Salvador last month and for the entire 8 days the set waves ranged from head high to well overhead/approaching DOH.

    I brought two 6'2"s expecting mostly shoulder high based on the forecasts before we left which undercalled. The 6'2" was all i rode. The points were so perfect and pristine that padding a 6'2" into well overhead waves was way easier than our local beachbreaks woudl have been even a couple feet smaller.

    One day after surfing all morning we noticed it was pretty empty out front mid afternoon and paddled out on some longboards that the place we stayed had sitting around. The one i used a big thick 9'4" Yater. What a RUSH paddling a big log down a nice long steep drop and out onto 200 yards of 8 foot+ face. Crazy Fun! Everyone should try it before they decide logs are only for ankle-waist high waves. They are mad fun in the right overhead conditions. At least i think so.
    I totally agree. A longboard can be incredibly responsive and nimble with the right surfer on big waves.

    I don't agree that longboards are a crutch but I understand your argument. If someone is riding one in order to prolong their surfing career are you really gonna be upset with them?

    Since golf has been the accepted comparison... are you upset with someone when they switch from steel shafts to graphite?

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    in the grace of the most holy FSM
    Posts
    3,559
    Quote Originally Posted by ClemsonSurf View Post
    I totally agree. A longboard can be incredibly responsive and nimble with the right surfer on big waves.

    I don't agree that longboards are a crutch but I understand your argument. If someone is riding one in order to prolong their surfing career are you really gonna be upset with them?

    Since golf has been the accepted comparison... are you upset with someone when they switch from steel shafts to graphite?

    i don't really give a crap about golf, so i have no opinion one or another & couldn't even say that i understand the comparison.
    if a person is riding a longboard to prolong their surfing career rather than keeping themselves fit, then yes, i have a problem w/ that. my father's 66, just had a total knee replacement, & still rides a shortboard most of the time & out paddle guys more than half his age. that just goes to show that if you keep yourself fit & healthy, you don't need to switch to a longboard as you age unless you choose to. & at that point, it's a crutch. same goes for SUKs, those huge 7S superfish, & the rest of that breed of weekend warrior friendly "design".

    let me be absolutely clear: i have absolutely NO beef w/ longboarders. if that's what you want to ride, great. very few people ride one well, particularly when it comes to old-skool noseriders. they are not easy to ride well & i have great respect for those who can & do. but to say that you need one as you age or that it's "the call" in over-head groundswell shows a lack of vision & (to me) a lack of knowledge of board design. w/ all the advances in volume distribution, templating, & foil, the days of the longboard as the only option in small or gutless surf is over, ditto for overhead, heaving winter groundswell. a little searching will turn up countless options.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Pensacola, FL
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by Bronze Whaler View Post
    I like going fast. I like to straight up the wave, turn close 180 degrees (or more) on a dime and come back down. I like to fit three in turns in on a waist high wave. I like to throw backside buckets one after another.

    Do I have to pump it somes times just to milk enough speed up to do one good turn- yeah I do and it's more fun than just standing there when I take the top off that mushy slop.

    I like knowing that if I ran into Luke, Joel or Mick (pros about my size) they might say "that board looks sick mate- you wanna switch with me for a few waves?"
    When you're 70 you'll be on a longboard!

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    109
    Images
    7
    Why does everyone care what other people ride or if the know how to ride correctly or not. As long as someone is not dropping in on your why do you care what they do? Surfing is not a competition its just a way to enjoy the ocean.