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  1. #21
    According to one long range forecaster who is more often right than wrong, we might not have much of a Cape Verde tropical season this year given a developing El Nino in the Pacific. El Ninos result in W/SW'ly shearing winds in the tropical Atlantic, either destroying ciruclations before they can get fired up or turning the storms poleward as they reach 50 degrees west longitude. We may be in for the more home-grown variety, spinning up in the Gulf or near-Atlantic.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by shark-hunter View Post
    The warmer the water temp the better. I hope it gets to the upper 80s. lol I don't know how anyone could find 80 degree water temperature to be "hot".
    those of us who surf year round.

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by aka pumpmaster View Post
    those of us who surf year round.
    yeah...lunatics.(year round in northern climates) lol Hey, but whatever works for you.

  4. #24
    Join Date
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    Right... And, we have already seen the home grown variety this year with 3 storms before July. I suspect we will see many more develop right along the coast, and in my view, these storms can often be the best!

    Quote Originally Posted by Mid-Life Crisis View Post
    According to one long range forecaster who is more often right than wrong, we might not have much of a Cape Verde tropical season this year given a developing El Nino in the Pacific. El Ninos result in W/SW'ly shearing winds in the tropical Atlantic, either destroying ciruclations before they can get fired up or turning the storms poleward as they reach 50 degrees west longitude. We may be in for the more home-grown variety, spinning up in the Gulf or near-Atlantic.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swellinfo View Post
    I suspect we will see many more develop right along the coast, and in my view, these storms can often be the best!
    Couldn't agree more. Shorter period means more beaches will hold the size.

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Mid-Life Crisis View Post
    According to one long range forecaster who is more often right than wrong, we might not have much of a Cape Verde tropical season this year given a developing El Nino in the Pacific. El Ninos result in W/SW'ly shearing winds in the tropical Atlantic, either destroying ciruclations before they can get fired up or turning the storms poleward as they reach 50 degrees west longitude. We may be in for the more home-grown variety, spinning up in the Gulf or near-Atlantic.
    Here's a neat local article about sea turtle nesting and predicting storms:

    http://jacksonville.com/community/sh...g-send-message


    So, do you guys notice if the turtle nests are at a higher elevation than usual?

  7. #27
    Mabye the turtles are getting a head start on long term rising mean water heights from global warming.

    I kind of group the turtle phenomenon with wooly catepillars and the Farmer's Almanac. Maybe there's something to it, but maybe not. Much of the same can be said of our meteorology experts who think they've uncovered the holy grail to tropical storm prediction. That's right about the point where Mother Nature humbles them (and us) once again.

    I haven't made it to the beach yet, but my vacation starts this weekend. I'll certainly give the turtle nests a look when I get there.