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  1. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by dlrouen View Post
    First off, the ocean is totally different from our roads. In no way would I ever want to see another surfer / person (tourist included) get hurt by a surfboard or by a surfer. Let me get that out of the way.

    All beaches are set up differently. My spot is in a more residential area with minimal parking for non-locals. I see the same people almost every day. My spot is in front of my house and I have surfed the same spot for over 13 years. The moment we have better than average waves, everyone and their grandmother paddle out. I hate paddling out and surfing with some Raleigh dude who rides for "Team Salt Life."

    I have my opinion and you do too. Respect mine and I will respect yours. Don't surf my spot.

    ***I added the following, hence the EDIT***
    Going back to the first comment of the thread - In addition to not wanting to see anyone injure themselves, or others while surfing; I do not endorse fighting in the ocean at all. I can hate on out-of-towners and others all day, but I would never intentionally hurt another or start a fight. It's the ocean, not a boxing ring.

    NC does not have the federal/state funding like our northern states. The town of CB is extremely small and every tax dollar counts. Come September CB turns into a ghost town; yet, it is up to the locals to preserve our town for the summer crowd. Locals support smaller economies, so families have a nice place to visit year after year. Who is going to pay for the costly hurricane damages? Not Raleigh Who is going to keep local restaurants running during the slow season? Not tourist.

    As for my last post: I don't drop in on anyone - it was a joke.
    cb gets plenty of federal funding http://islandgazette.net/news-server...-inlet-funding

  2. #42
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    im glad i live where i live, there are popular surfing beaches in Fl that get crowded, with that being said, i can walk 200 yrds. or drive 2 miles to get out of the crowds, i feel bad for the people that dont have that kind of opportunity to do so, it must be tough living in the northern part of our country with the crowds and the extreme cold in the winter.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sloop John B. View Post
    I try to get out when I'm home for Spring Break, Fall Break, etc. and I usually get a few days during those that I can break away from family to have fun in the ocean, but I don't think that my decision to go to a school based on academics (I was assured a spot in medical school because of a program I was accepted to) and environment (small liberal arts college) makes me any less respectable as a surfer. I don't plan my academics around being able to go in the ocean year round, but I don't think that you should have to in order to not have assholes drop in on you and ****.
    Water safety is paramount to all, I have a family who are more important than anything and I am the sole bread winner. That being said, I am guilty of horsing around every chance I get and have the scars to prove it, when it was only me arse on the line. I have never injured anyone else in the water, nor have my actions or inactions ever resulted in another person being injured. I have performed more water rescues as a white kayaking guide in my exile to the North East than I could count, so I can say that my actions in the water have directly resulted in other people’s safety. I will say, I agree with the sentiment of your original post. Violence in the water is unnecessary. Hilarious, but unnecessary. The “respectable” comment, though, I wanted to offer a countering view. “Local” can be just as dirty a word on this board as “summer surfer” it seems sometimes.


    Two points:

    1)
    Taj Burrow wrote, “The only difference between you and me is time in the water and commitment”. So, if by respectable you are indicating water skill and overall "Waterman"-ship as you put it, then by that strict definition, then yes the fact that I live 5 blocks from the ocean and either get my board or my pole (fishing pole that is wet everyday and you live in landlocked Bumblefark, Egypt indicates that I and my fellow "Locals" (I know, that dirty word) are more "respectable" (I'm very confused by the implied meaning you are putting on this word, as Indigo Montaya said, "this word, you keep using. I do not thing that it means what you think it means.") We spend more time in the water, that makes a world of difference. There is no substitute for time on the water. I know for a fact that there is a difference in my skill set if I spend 1 day not surfing and I think in many ways a surfer’s skill indicates whether he or she gets (or should get) the wave. I went to Phoenix for 4 days on a biz trip last week, trust me I could tell the difference when I paddled out Saturday morning. If by respectable you mean, you deserve respect, because you are a fellow surfer and we are brethren united by watery bonds. Well [dramatic pause for effect], I ain’t quite with you on that bra. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t intentionally snake or drop in on people, but it happens, we’ve all done it and the fundamental truth is, if I know you (and you’re a surfing acquaintance and not a good friend, in which case all bets are off and you and I have probably crashed into one another 3 times today just for schitzen und gigglez and to see who could snake the other guy the most and how many dings we could put in each other’s boards), I’m going to make more of an effort not do it. Why? Because, the consequences are that I will see you tomorrow and you’ll return the favor. However, if you are an interloper on the break I surf every day, what are the consequences? You get angry, but eventually you go away, while I keep surfing there day in and day out. I expect to be treated in this exact same manner when I go to a break other than my own and have been. I don’t get the choice of the best waves. I have to stay out of other people’s way. Maybe it’s growing up around it all, but the pecking order on a break is easy for me to spot and every break has it. Interlopers don’t get this, because they don’t see it. Life has a pecking order and is competitive, so is surfing. Why do locals get the best waves at certain spots? Because we all know each other and we post up where it breaks the best and we sit together in tight little groups, take turns and when someone we don’t know tries to edge their way in on the action, it turns back into the High School lunch room. Sorry, cool kids only and we give ‘em a hard time and the stink eye and snake ‘em if they don’t get the point (sorry, I’m just calling it like I see it). A watering hole only supports so many lions. There are plenty of breaks that cater to out of towners and non-locals. I think there are a lot more that don’t. Being at the bottom of the pecking order in Imperial Beach (not my break, but somewhere I surf frequently), I’m pretty familiar with this. I’m an interloper there and barely tolerated, because I hang out with all those guys and know them, but I’ll never be a local. Which means I eat it there a lot, just because choice spots are few and far between and non-choice spots will send you into the spin cycle. My father-in-law says it was the same way when Depsey taught his generation how to surf the slough. So I’m respectful, but never respected. Proving that at least in the surfing world, it’s not whom you know; but more akin to the 3 desiderata of real estate: location, location, location.

    2) Merriam-Webster defines dilettante as:
    1: an admirer or lover of the arts
    2: a person having a superficial interest in an art or a branch of knowledge

    Which is great, but there’s a difference between a dilettante and a production artist. I used to be a production glassblower and supported myself solely off that income, now I am dilettante because I do it rarely in my spare time. I don’t deserve the respect of the production glassblowing community, nor do I ask for it. My skill set has atrophied. Same goes for any of my other hobbies. That’s why they are hobbies. There are some things in which I am not a dilettante. Surfing is one. My current profession is the other, the time I spend at each everyday is why I am not. You chose to move away from the ocean and placed surfing secondary to your education; good for you! With good grades and perseverance, you will be rewarded. I made a similar choice once for my career, moved in-land and put on 40 lbs. I could still surf, in many ways the basics are easy and I totaled maybe 2 to 3 weeks in the water annually; but that doesn’t mean that I was a surfer. Surfing a few weeks a year is great, but I don’t think it makes me a surfer anymore than owning a surfboard does. Same for being a waterman, I grew up on the water my whole life, moving away from it dulled my instincts. I became a dilettante. There’s nothing wrong with that, but thinking that I had the same skills or innate knowledge of the ocean that someone who is on it every day has takes a lot of hubris. I’m never going to respect a dilettante the same I respect a maestro. You might paint a great portrait from watching Bob Ross (puff, cough, cough); but it’s no Guernica and never will be. If you don’t surf as much as the waves allow and you physically can, your skill set will be that of a dilettante. The surfing G-ds demand this, as is the case with anything else. I was surfing with a couple of Pros on my beach yesterday, you know them. They aren’t friends, but acquaintances and I see them there a few times a month or so. Surfing in the lineup next to guys like that, it’s very easy to know where you measure up. Compared to guys like that, I am a dilettante; however compared to the interloper, I am a surfer. I have the lanky muscles. I have the year round tan. My hair is bleached from the sun, the corners of my eyes are crow’s feet. My toes have painful corns, my feet odd knobs. I have no neck, only trapezius that connect my shoulders to my head. My surf vehicle of choice is a bike and my board shorts never get a chance to dry out in the summer any more than my wet suits do in the winter and my wife complains constantly about their mildewed scent. You cannot buy these things with any currency except time in the water. It is what separates you and I. When I am on my break and look down the line-up to the surfer on my right or left and they don’t wear the same badges, I must choose to either take the wave or GIVE it to them. Those pros I was surfing with yesterday, they made that same choice I do, only with everyone else on the break, they were kinda respectful though and didn’t hog ALL the waves even though they could have, those two guy’s local break is Cardiff. Chances are, I’m going to give it to you, especially if you have the right of way, as that is proper etiquette. Not always though. Giving up waves is not an easy thing to do and my break like all others in San Diego gets darn crowded. Sorry.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    Massapequa, New York
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    95
    Quote Originally Posted by zaGaffer View Post
    Water safety is paramount to all, I have a family who are more important than anything and I am the sole bread winner. That being said, I am guilty of horsing around every chance I get and have the scars to prove it, when it was only me arse on the line. I have never injured anyone else in the water, nor have my actions or inactions ever resulted in another person being injured. I have performed more water rescues as a white kayaking guide in my exile to the North East than I could count, so I can say that my actions in the water have directly resulted in other peopleís safety. I will say, I agree with the sentiment of your original post. Violence in the water is unnecessary. Hilarious, but unnecessary. The ďrespectableĒ comment, though, I wanted to offer a countering view. ďLocalĒ can be just as dirty a word on this board as ďsummer surferĒ it seems sometimes.


    Two points:

    1)
    Taj Burrow wrote, ďThe only difference between you and me is time in the water and commitmentĒ. So, if by respectable you are indicating water skill and overall "Waterman"-ship as you put it, then by that strict definition, then yes the fact that I live 5 blocks from the ocean and either get my board or my pole (fishing pole that is wet everyday and you live in landlocked Bumblefark, Egypt indicates that I and my fellow "Locals" (I know, that dirty word) are more "respectable" (I'm very confused by the implied meaning you are putting on this word, as Indigo Montaya said, "this word, you keep using. I do not thing that it means what you think it means.") We spend more time in the water, that makes a world of difference. There is no substitute for time on the water. I know for a fact that there is a difference in my skill set if I spend 1 day not surfing and I think in many ways a surferís skill indicates whether he or she gets (or should get) the wave. I went to Phoenix for 4 days on a biz trip last week, trust me I could tell the difference when I paddled out Saturday morning. If by respectable you mean, you deserve respect, because you are a fellow surfer and we are brethren united by watery bonds. Well [dramatic pause for effect], I ainít quite with you on that bra. Donít get me wrong, I donít intentionally snake or drop in on people, but it happens, weíve all done it and the fundamental truth is, if I know you (and youíre a surfing acquaintance and not a good friend, in which case all bets are off and you and I have probably crashed into one another 3 times today just for schitzen und gigglez and to see who could snake the other guy the most and how many dings we could put in each otherís boards), Iím going to make more of an effort not do it. Why? Because, the consequences are that I will see you tomorrow and youíll return the favor. However, if you are an interloper on the break I surf every day, what are the consequences? You get angry, but eventually you go away, while I keep surfing there day in and day out. I expect to be treated in this exact same manner when I go to a break other than my own and have been. I donít get the choice of the best waves. I have to stay out of other peopleís way. Maybe itís growing up around it all, but the pecking order on a break is easy for me to spot and every break has it. Interlopers donít get this, because they donít see it. Life has a pecking order and is competitive, so is surfing. Why do locals get the best waves at certain spots? Because we all know each other and we post up where it breaks the best and we sit together in tight little groups, take turns and when someone we donít know tries to edge their way in on the action, it turns back into the High School lunch room. Sorry, cool kids only and we give Ďem a hard time and the stink eye and snake Ďem if they donít get the point (sorry, Iím just calling it like I see it). A watering hole only supports so many lions. There are plenty of breaks that cater to out of towners and non-locals. I think there are a lot more that donít. Being at the bottom of the pecking order in Imperial Beach (not my break, but somewhere I surf frequently), Iím pretty familiar with this. Iím an interloper there and barely tolerated, because I hang out with all those guys and know them, but Iíll never be a local. Which means I eat it there a lot, just because choice spots are few and far between and non-choice spots will send you into the spin cycle. My father-in-law says it was the same way when Depsey taught his generation how to surf the slough. So Iím respectful, but never respected. Proving that at least in the surfing world, itís not whom you know; but more akin to the 3 desiderata of real estate: location, location, location.

    2) Merriam-Webster defines dilettante as:
    1: an admirer or lover of the arts
    2: a person having a superficial interest in an art or a branch of knowledge

    Which is great, but thereís a difference between a dilettante and a production artist. I used to be a production glassblower and supported myself solely off that income, now I am dilettante because I do it rarely in my spare time. I donít deserve the respect of the production glassblowing community, nor do I ask for it. My skill set has atrophied. Same goes for any of my other hobbies. Thatís why they are hobbies. There are some things in which I am not a dilettante. Surfing is one. My current profession is the other, the time I spend at each everyday is why I am not. You chose to move away from the ocean and placed surfing secondary to your education; good for you! With good grades and perseverance, you will be rewarded. I made a similar choice once for my career, moved in-land and put on 40 lbs. I could still surf, in many ways the basics are easy and I totaled maybe 2 to 3 weeks in the water annually; but that doesnít mean that I was a surfer. Surfing a few weeks a year is great, but I donít think it makes me a surfer anymore than owning a surfboard does. Same for being a waterman, I grew up on the water my whole life, moving away from it dulled my instincts. I became a dilettante. Thereís nothing wrong with that, but thinking that I had the same skills or innate knowledge of the ocean that someone who is on it every day has takes a lot of hubris. Iím never going to respect a dilettante the same I respect a maestro. You might paint a great portrait from watching Bob Ross (puff, cough, cough); but itís no Guernica and never will be. If you donít surf as much as the waves allow and you physically can, your skill set will be that of a dilettante. The surfing G-ds demand this, as is the case with anything else. I was surfing with a couple of Pros on my beach yesterday, you know them. They arenít friends, but acquaintances and I see them there a few times a month or so. Surfing in the lineup next to guys like that, itís very easy to know where you measure up. Compared to guys like that, I am a dilettante; however compared to the interloper, I am a surfer. I have the lanky muscles. I have the year round tan. My hair is bleached from the sun, the corners of my eyes are crowís feet. My toes have painful corns, my feet odd knobs. I have no neck, only trapezius that connect my shoulders to my head. My surf vehicle of choice is a bike and my board shorts never get a chance to dry out in the summer any more than my wet suits do in the winter and my wife complains constantly about their mildewed scent. You cannot buy these things with any currency except time in the water. It is what separates you and I. When I am on my break and look down the line-up to the surfer on my right or left and they donít wear the same badges, I must choose to either take the wave or GIVE it to them. Those pros I was surfing with yesterday, they made that same choice I do, only with everyone else on the break, they were kinda respectful though and didnít hog ALL the waves even though they could have, those two guyís local break is Cardiff. Chances are, Iím going to give it to you, especially if you have the right of way, as that is proper etiquette. Not always though. Giving up waves is not an easy thing to do and my break like all others in San Diego gets darn crowded. Sorry.
    Hah, Bumble****, Egypt. Yeah, Pennsylvania's not the same deal. I come back from not surfing in a while and it'll take me a wave or two to get my bearings again, but for me it doesn't take that long to get the acuity back.

    As far as being a waterman, I've lived on waterfront property basically my whole life. It's my sanctuary and my release. The worst part of college for me is being away from the ocean.

    I don't respect you more because happenstance or different priorities leaves you with more time to go in the ocean. I don't even respect you more if you're a better surfer than I am. I don't respect lesser surfers less because of their surfing ability.

    The way I see it, I love surfing and I want it to thrive. I want it to thrive in the hearts of as many people as possible. If that means that after paddling back from a nice wave I just rode, I sit on my board and let it go under me so that the beginner on the foamie can understand what it means to fly down a steep face, that's worth it to me. Even if they fall and get pummeled by it, thereby "wasting" the best wave of the day it's still worth it to me. It helps them to know what it's all about.

  5. #45
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    I have no ****ing agenda to push people out of the water. I'm a skilled surfer and I can avoid people who don't know what they're doing on waves pretty well. That **** doesn't bother me. What bothers me is ****ed up attitudes and aggressiveness in the break. What bothers me is the god-damned pecking order. I honestly believe that entitlement leads to more accidents in the surf zone than beginner errors. Most collisions I see are between some beginner who cluelessly dropped in and some entitled prick zooming down the line, refusing to pull out, and deliberately trying to either hit or buzz super close to the other dude . . .

    People like you just fill lineups with negativity and selfish vibes. Get over yourself and look after your sport and the safety of others rather than your private little wave quota. Waterman? Hah. That's like doctors who assist in the practice of the death penalty . . .

  6. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by srfman11 View Post
    Thanks srfman11 for the amazing article. It was great bathroom reading. I am glad CB will get a small portion of the pie, since nourishment was not included in this year's budget for other small beaches, like neighboring Kure Beach.

    Even though government funding is totally irrelevant to this thread, I will expand on this a little more.

    Funding goes way beyond nourishment, srfman11. If you think about it, nourishment is almost necessary for beaches on the East Coast, since hurricanes ravage our coastline every year. Without nourishment, we would have a receding coastline or our favorite beaches would be gone forever. Take a look at the OBX after last year's hurricane season. I thought that the OBX was gone forever. Anyway, beaches need more than nourishment, especially since beaches play such an integral role in tourism for most states. What about the streets, the water, the flooding, etc. Take a look at my signature - "DON'T DRINK THE WATER." It's because you will die if you drink the water in CB. If this is news to you, read the letter that is mailed with every water bill. Instead of fixing these issues, among other issues, the state has to repave I-40 and the Governor's mansion needs another fireplace. I know that every need can not be fixed right away; however, our coast brings in so much money for the state, the least they could do is re-nourish our beaches. That way the fat a$$ people from Leland have a place to sit and throw bread to seagulls, so they can sh1t all over the "nourished" beach. Who paid for our freshly paved roads? Local funding. How about our bridge "re-construction?" Local funding.

  7. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by Sloop John B. View Post
    I have no ****ing agenda to push people out of the water. I'm a skilled surfer and I can avoid people who don't know what they're doing on waves pretty well. That **** doesn't bother me. What bothers me is ****ed up attitudes and aggressiveness in the break. What bothers me is the god-damned pecking order. I honestly believe that entitlement leads to more accidents in the surf zone than beginner errors. Most collisions I see are between some beginner who cluelessly dropped in and some entitled prick zooming down the line, refusing to pull out, and deliberately trying to either hit or buzz super close to the other dude . . .

    People like you just fill lineups with negativity and selfish vibes. Get over yourself and look after your sport and the safety of others rather than your private little wave quota. Waterman? Hah. That's like doctors who assist in the practice of the death penalty . . .
    Sounds like you're pretty adamant about this issue. It also sounds like you spent all weekend getting cut off and dropped in on by the local "summer pros." Why don't you quit whining and go show those dudes what's up? This is a forum, not Desperate Housewives.

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by dlrouen View Post
    Sounds like you're pretty adamant about this issue. It also sounds like you spent all weekend getting cut off and dropped in on by the local "summer pros." Why don't you quit whining and go show those dudes what's up? This is a forum, not Desperate Housewives.
    I wasn't getting dropped in on very much. I wasn't the one getting dropped in on. I simply reported on how people were being idiots and threatening violence on other people, and I think that's lame. I went on to say how I think bad vibes are the major problem in the lineup. How do you suggest I "Show those dudes what's up" without doing something against my values of not giving off bad vibes in the lineup?

  9. #49
    Quote Originally Posted by Sloop John B. View Post
    I wasn't getting dropped in on very much. I wasn't the one getting dropped in on. I simply reported on how people were being idiots and threatening violence on other people, and I think that's lame. I went on to say how I think bad vibes are the major problem in the lineup. How do you suggest I "Show those dudes what's up" without doing something against my values of not giving off bad vibes in the lineup?
    "Show those dudes what's up" does not refer to doing something against your "values." In all honesty, it sounds like the surfers on your break don't respect one another, yet alone you. You gain respect (and wave count) by surfing with everything. Make every wave count and paddle right back out after catching one. Make sure the "local summer pros" know that you are just as entitled to share the waves than they are. You have to earn it.

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by dlrouen View Post
    "Show those dudes what's up" does not refer to doing something against your "values." In all honesty, it sounds like the surfers on your break don't respect one another, yet alone you. You gain respect (and wave count) by surfing with everything. Make every wave count and paddle right back out after catching one. Make sure the "local summer pros" know that you are just as entitled to share the waves than they are. You have to earn it.
    I surf well and surf often. People mainly respect each other. It was a weekend in July, so there were a lot of people. There were like two people mouthing off on sunday, and one asshole a couple other days. It's a few people in a crazy big lineup.

    I'm out there at either Hemlock or Lincoln most days of the week and people recognize me at both of those spots.

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