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  1. #1

    Building a hamboard

    Hey guys I know this really isn't the site to post this but we're all board riders and I was gonna build a hamboard (its a 7ft piece of shaped plywood that looks like a longboard but have trucks and wheels) if you guys have any advice on what wood to use? What thickness? I was gonna make it 7 feet by about 16-17 inches wide and about 3/4 inches thick.

  2. #2
    3/4" atleast depending on wood you use, maybe just use some pine or somnething cheap for your first one, then use some oak or something when you have a good idea of the whole thing.

  3. #3
    Yeah I was just gonna use a cheap piece of pine and shape it with a circular saw and a router bit and lots of sand paper and some of that clear tacky gloss for grip tape or just go over to zumiez and get them to do it

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Manasquan
    Posts
    303
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    routers are no joke, respect your tool and it will respect you. it has nearly taken off my fingers a few times.

  5. #5
    I was gonna let my dad handle the router but I'm using the saw

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    under the pier
    Posts
    324
    plywood will not work, it will bow in the middle from being so long and not be strong enough an if you go with super thick wood its going to weight a ton and not have much flex when turning and carving. plus and moisture is going to get in it and warp the wood

  7. #7
    So should I use Baltic birch?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Wilmington
    Posts
    2,340
    Use plywood but put a couple 1" edge grain stringers on the bottom to stiffen it up. Or you could get some solid maple, shape it and laminate it edge grain vertical and be able to get away with a 1" thick solid wood board.

    How much fun do you want to have?

  9. #9
    What do you mean by edge grain stringers

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Wilmington
    Posts
    2,340
    I'm talking about how you orient the wood. You see, wood is stronger in some directions than it is in others--it has to do with how the grain is oriented. Read this, it's the best explanation I found that puts it in terms easy to understand.
    http://www.zimbio.com/Woodworking/ar...ing+wood+grain