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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Central FL
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    4,096

    What's your style?

    There are many ways to ride waves, but everybody eventually develops their own style and surfs a certain way, given the conditions and equipment they are using. If you surf various different boards, how does your surfing differ? Also, how does your technique change as the size of the wave changes?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,096
    For me i prefer the more old school syle vs. the new school (air mentality), airs are cool and all but like most things, they are better in moderation. I like long rides and big arching turns, i like watching guys like Buttons surf, it's freaking art what he was (and probably still is) able to do. For me that's what surfing should look like, but to each their own.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    In a state of flux
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    3,163
    i try to surf like tom curren did in the 80s. slashy and flowy at the same time (the key word is TRY).

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,096
    Quote Originally Posted by aka pumpmaster View Post
    i try to surf like tom curren did in the 80s. slashy and flowy at the same time (the key word is TRY).
    True that, trying is all you can do i guess, i'll never be anywhere near as good as Buttons but i'm going to have fun no matter what, which is all that really matters.

  5. #5
    I like gliding up and down on super clean faces. Never hurts to throw a nice cut back, when the waves allow you to. What can I say - I am a believer in restoring power. Props to my fellow single fin riders.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Out on the island
    Posts
    379
    big fan of Terry Fitzgerald and Wayne Lynch. there style had so much speed and flow. My board choices and most frequented surf spot lately have been going that way too.
    Last edited by Peajay4060; Jul 24, 2012 at 06:21 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,096
    Quote Originally Posted by dlrouen View Post
    I like gliding up and down on super clean faces. Never hurts to throw a nice cut back, when the waves allow you to. What can I say - I am a believer in restoring power. Props to my fellow single fin riders.
    Good stuff. Is your style the same no matter the wave size or would you say you do things differently as the waves get larger? This would include all techniques, from paddling, to popping up, to dropping in and riding the wave...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
    Posts
    2,445
    For me, the surf dictates the board. The board dictates the style. I don't try to ride a fish like a groveler... or a log like a shortboard. It just doesn't feel right, and I'm pretty sure it looks bad, too. I guess that's the most important thing... trying to ride the board the way it's designed to be ridden, taking advantage of it's strengths, and not trying to force it to do something it's not supposed to do.

    In smaller and weaker surf, fish and logs should be surfed with flow and grace. These waves don't have much power, so these boards emphasize flow and style.

    In medium, snappy surf, grovelers are surfed with quickness, and a more snappy, slashy style, to match the wave.

    Performance shortboards should be surfed with power, and in the pocket, matching the power of better surf.

    A stepup or semigun is surfed with speed and control, in tune with the speed and almost "slow motion" power that comes with the size.
    Last edited by LBCrew; Jul 24, 2012 at 06:49 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,096
    Quote Originally Posted by LBCrew View Post
    For me, the surf dictates the board. The board dictates the style. I don't try to ride a fish like a groveler... or a log like a shortboard. It just doesn't feel right, and I'm pretty sure it looks bad, too. I guess that's the most important thing... trying to ride the board the way it's designed to be ridden, taking advantage of it's strengths, and not trying to force it to do something it's not supposed to do.
    Great points, i'm learning more and more how to do this

  10. #10
    I think stinkbug and twitchy would describe 98.3% of the posters on this forums.