LOGIN | REGISTER

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ocean City, MD
    Posts
    105

    Backside on a Twin

    Does anyone else have trouble going backside on a twin? I can go backside on my thruster and single fin, but it seems like I only have a 30% success rate dropping in when I try and go backside on my twin fish. The board seems to just slip down the face of the wave and never really gets a grip.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    LI NY
    Posts
    114
    Many people will say that twins are harder to surf backside. I think they work fine, you just need to stay on top of them or they will get away from you. I actually like the slippery/drifty feeling of a twin.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    VB via PR and HI
    Posts
    231
    Quote Originally Posted by surfnut1018 View Post
    Does anyone else have trouble going backside on a twin? I can go backside on my thruster and single fin, but it seems like I only have a 30% success rate dropping in when I try and go backside on my twin fish. The board seems to just slip down the face of the wave and never really gets a grip.
    I surf my twin like a longboard and draw turns out moreso than I would a thruster, especially backside. There is a period of adjustment if you are just starting to surf a twin but once you get used to it delivers a different perspective. I havent ridden anything below head high on a thruster since last year.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Charleston
    Posts
    904
    Images
    8
    I've been experimenting with twins for most of this summer. I've found I really have to focus on my back foot placement, making sure it's right over the fins. Your backside pop up is probably slightly different from you front side.

  5. #5
    I love going backside on twins. Heck, any side on twins is a bonus. You don't often get the chance, so when you do, gotta make it count with those sisters.

  6. #6
    Asymmetrical boards are made so your backside has a quad setup and frontside has a twin keel setup. Concept is that backside pumping is best with looseness of quad and you get the frontside stiffness of a keel.

    http://surfboardsbyhydrodynamica.com/hulls/ekstrom.html

    Maybe if you pick up a quad or twinzer, you may have more control. I know what you mean with this post. I agree that foot placement has a lot to do with it. I learned to crank turns on my classic fish when I had my feet back on the board rather than up the nose which creates a weird pivot point.

  7. #7
    I've been doing some experimenting as well.. I find that you need to focus on one twin more than the other. This makes the other twin jealous and willing to do a lot more t earn your attention. Once you turn them against each other you've got them both in the bag... Good luck!

    Quote Originally Posted by ClemsonSurf View Post
    I've been experimenting with twins for most of this summer. I've found I really have to focus on my back foot placement, making sure it's right over the fins. Your backside pop up is probably slightly different from you front side.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by nynj View Post
    I've been doing some experimenting as well.. I find that you need to focus on one twin more than the other. This makes the other twin jealous and willing to do a lot more t earn your attention. Once you turn them against each other you've got them both in the bag... Good luck!
    I can confirm this works with "fins" from the same manufacturer even if they aren't twins.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Singer Island
    Posts
    807
    It's been awhile since I rode a twin, but I remember that on larger waves you need to go down and out in the flats and draw the turn out so you don't spin out. Get low, in a crouch so you are centered over the board. On smaller waves, which is what they are best in, I personally like the skatey slidey feeling. Throw some tail, go vert, surf it rail to rail, bust some 360s, cause they don't like to go straight down the line like a thruster ( hence the name ).

  10. #10
    The shape of the board,fin placement,rocker etc,etc,etc also contribute to the overall ride... ex: A wide-tailed keel fish running flat foiled keels is going to be "stickier" than say a modern twin with a pulled in tail and a more vertical fin template.
    -Cheers