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  1. #41
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    Mar 2012
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    Central FL
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    So after this thread I went online and bought a few shirts from WRV and had them delivered. Got everything I ordered in a timely fashion, receipt included in the package and got the exact shirts I ordered in the correct sizes. No issues, and the prices were great too. Just thought i'd throw it out there....

  2. #42
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    Charleston
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    Quote Originally Posted by DawnPatrolSUP View Post
    So after this thread I went online and bought a few shirts from WRV and had them delivered. Got everything I ordered in a timely fashion, receipt included in the package and got the exact shirts I ordered in the correct sizes. No issues, and the prices were great too. Just thought i'd throw it out there....
    Just goes to show you that any publicity is good publicity. I bet Shane farted in the box before he sent it to you.

  3. #43
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    Mar 2012
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    Central FL
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    Quote Originally Posted by ClemsonSurf View Post
    Just goes to show you that any publicity is good publicity. I bet Shane farted in the box before he sent it to you.
    It did have an odd smell, strange...

  4. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by aka pumpmaster View Post
    we are talking about surfers here....The guy was probably pissed off that he was stuck in the shop while it was firing. not to say his attitude was right but I can understand it and have seen it a billion times over the years. some shops are like that (to be fair, i have no clue how WRV operates). They serve locals and do ok with that. If they don't know you, then they tend to be standoffish. If that is the way this shop works then go somewhere else.
    If they were surfers, wouldn't they know something about the surfboards they were selling. Had pretty much the same experience as yankee at the shop in Kitty Hawk a couple years ago...save it please, pumpmaster...I can almost guarantee that you've never even been there. And I'm calling bull**** on your surfer theory, I'm a damn good worker.

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    RVA
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    188
    Only time I've ever been into a WRV shop has been on the North Shore. The employee in there was absolutely classic. He came over from Cali to live the hippy-surf bum dream and shred the north shore, while working at a shop that paid him very little money. He had no reason to be nice to me. It was off-season. It was almost closing time. But instead of being a Shane about it, he talked to me for a while and told me the story about how he ended up in Hawaii. I wasn't going to buy anything, but I felt like I needed to after being treated so well. I brought up some fins and a couple tanks to the register. The guy looked at the stuff and said, "I'll give you 1/2 off the fins and take the tanks for ten bucks each."

    I'll never forget that dude. And me writing about it now goes to show how important customer service is these days. I think that was the main point OP was trying to get across. You treat your customer well, give them something worth remembering, show them a good experience, and they will likely share that experience with others and recommend your brand.

    My two cents.

  6. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by yankee View Post
    I support 'local surf shops.' Includes WRV. Might get a board bag for less money on dogfunk.com? Yes. I have stayed local.

    I stopped by WRV VA B last week. Was looking for boards & board bags. Selected a board bag on my own, because after 10 minutes of being ignored by WRV staff I figured it out on my own. Selected a board bag, unhooked it & brought it to the counter. And then waited 5 mins. I know it was 5 mins, because I clocked it. Where in this world of gringo North American consumerism does anyone wait 5 minutes at a counter to purchase goods?

    WRV. That's where.

    The worst was yet to come. As I'm standing there at the counter, waiting, looking at bars of wax & assorted whatevers, an employee, approximately late 30's, named 'Shane' appears. "That it?" he grunts at me. I say excuse me? "Is that it?!" Shane states with a bit more eff you in his voice. I say, well, I'd like 3 bars of warm water wax & 4 bars of cold water wax. Shane slaps the wax on the counter & says that's $ 81.45. I say, uh, I'm guessing that you're not one of the owners? Shane: "huh?" Me: well, I'm not hearing much customer service here in your customer service business, and I don't like the way you just barked at me "that's it?." Shane says, "Don't know what to tell you, man." I say, well then, could I get a bag for the wax? And I hand him a Benjo, he hands me my change, doesn't say thank you, nothing at all, just stares at me like I don't belong there in WRV & like I'm not welcome at all.
    I finally break: I say, "I gotta tell ya, you're a jackass."

    Which, Shane is. A Jackass. He's destroying a business that someone built. He's pissing on the job opportunity that whoever owns WRV enabled him to have. At the very least, Shane is in the wrong business. Shane is unhelpful, totally rude, & does not understand client service as a business.

    I own a service business. I would never stand for this treatment of my clients. If I heard it, his Manager would have to restrain me from firing his arse & from firing his staffer's arse.
    Our clients will be treated as gold, nothing less, always !

    This guy Shane would be in re-training in 2 seconds. If he didn't get it, it he didn't want to get it, see ya, find a job with the county government where people really, truly are just marking time & collecting a paycheck & screwing businesses with higher taxes.

    I have heard from other friends & associates that their experiences with WRV mirrors mine. WRV must be creaming the tourists for the 90 day rack-it-up spell every summer.

    My experiences with rusty.com, whiskeymilitia.com, dogfunk.com, and many other online retailers is friendly, professional, helpful.

    Hello, WRV...?! That's what retail is, you clowns.

    I would not return to WRV, and I would not recommend WRV to anyone. No wonder the 'local surf shop' is getting its arse handed to itself via the Internet shops.
    Geez, should I shelve the Fernandez LB I'm looking at?

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    MD - VA
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    3,313
    Quote Originally Posted by Koki Barrels View Post
    If they were surfers, wouldn't they know something about the surfboards they were selling. Had pretty much the same experience as yankee at the shop in Kitty Hawk a couple years ago...save it please, pumpmaster...I can almost guarantee that you've never even been there. And I'm calling bull**** on your surfer theory, I'm a damn good worker.

    Nailed it as K Barrels usually does.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    MD - VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by JonAngot12 View Post
    Only time I've ever been into a WRV shop has been on the North Shore. The employee in there was absolutely classic. He came over from Cali to live the hippy-surf bum dream and shred the north shore, while working at a shop that paid him very little money. He had no reason to be nice to me. It was off-season. It was almost closing time. But instead of being a Shane about it, he talked to me for a while and told me the story about how he ended up in Hawaii. I wasn't going to buy anything, but I felt like I needed to after being treated so well. I brought up some fins and a couple tanks to the register. The guy looked at the stuff and said, "I'll give you 1/2 off the fins and take the tanks for ten bucks each."

    I'll never forget that dude. And me writing about it now goes to show how important customer service is these days. I think that was the main point OP was trying to get across. You treat your customer well, give them something worth remembering, show them a good experience, and they will likely share that experience with others and recommend your brand.

    My two cents.

    Great client service story; companies would kill for employees who approach it this way.

  9. Quote Originally Posted by yankee View Post
    So, this is positive, good stuff. Let' change the thread from how lame WRV is to how good some shops really are.

    Any other positive board shop experiences? I'm all for keeping it local. Not a big fan of anon Internet sites, no matter what the price is.
    I'm a sponger, so crucify me now for my love of riding flat. I've surfed stand-up, as in short boards, longboards, and SUP. To this day, though, nothing gets me off like bodyboarding and bodysurfing. As far as I'm concerned every 'local' shop I've ever been in whether here in VA Beach or along the West Coast, and even Hawaii, straight sucks. The service sucks, the a-holes working at them sucks. In general, local shops plain suck. No body knows anything useful, and its hard to find anyone to help out with real questions or concerns that I have regarding my advanced skill set, soul-like desires, and needs.

    However, I can go to e-bodyboarding.com, and when I have a question, Jay, as in former almost as great as Mike Stewart, Jay Reale will actually e-mail me back with very real answers to questions, or I can go online to any number of various shaper sites, either for surfboards or bodyboards (NMD comes to mind) and get very real answers to very serious equipment questions. Thus, the idea of anonymous internet sites is a complete and total farce. I get way better service online then I've ever got in any local shops in 30+ years in the water, so to tell me to be positive about kids who have no knowledge beyond whats in the latest magazine at the local shop is to tell me to stick my head in the sand and accept poor service. I don't think so. I refuse to shop local because the shops tend to be expensive and pretentious. In a world where its all about who you know, nobody knows me, because I spend my time surfing not trying to prove to some young kook how cool I am by surfing at the overcrowded spots, no matter where it is that I'm surfing.

    If you want positive, its very hard for me to find a reason for me to give you any, but in VA Beach there is one minor exception, Austin Surfboards. There I find kindness, openness, and general Aloha. Everywhere else, and even at Freedom, for all those who proclaim its awesomeness, I find snobbery. I don't care to spend a lot of money on my sport, and at Freedom I feel as if I'm a lesser because of this choice. My fave there was I went in looking for a basic straw lifeguards hat, and the girl told me she'd lifeguarded for years and never heard of such a thing. There on the rack was one from Billabong. My problem is, I wanted one without some logo - a near impossible quest I know but excuse me for my peculiarities. Local shops just in general plain suck, the service sucks, and the prices super suck.

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    MD - VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by thisguysthumbs View Post
    I'm a sponger, so crucify me now for my love of riding flat. I've surfed stand-up, as in short boards, longboards, and SUP. To this day, though, nothing gets me off like bodyboarding and bodysurfing. As far as I'm concerned every 'local' shop I've ever been in whether here in VA Beach or along the West Coast, and even Hawaii, straight sucks. The service sucks, the a-holes working at them sucks. In general, local shops plain suck. No body knows anything useful, and its hard to find anyone to help out with real questions or concerns that I have regarding my advanced skill set, soul-like desires, and needs.

    However, I can go to e-bodyboarding.com, and when I have a question, Jay, as in former almost as great as Mike Stewart, Jay Reale will actually e-mail me back with very real answers to questions, or I can go online to any number of various shaper sites, either for surfboards or bodyboards (NMD comes to mind) and get very real answers to very serious equipment questions. Thus, the idea of anonymous internet sites is a complete and total farce. I get way better service online then I've ever got in any local shops in 30+ years in the water, so to tell me to be positive about kids who have no knowledge beyond whats in the latest magazine at the local shop is to tell me to stick my head in the sand and accept poor service. I don't think so. I refuse to shop local because the shops tend to be expensive and pretentious. In a world where its all about who you know, nobody knows me, because I spend my time surfing not trying to prove to some young kook how cool I am by surfing at the overcrowded spots, no matter where it is that I'm surfing.

    If you want positive, its very hard for me to find a reason for me to give you any, but in VA Beach there is one minor exception, Austin Surfboards. There I find kindness, openness, and general Aloha. Everywhere else, and even at Freedom, for all those who proclaim its awesomeness, I find snobbery. I don't care to spend a lot of money on my sport, and at Freedom I feel as if I'm a lesser because of this choice. My fave there was I went in looking for a basic straw lifeguards hat, and the girl told me she'd lifeguarded for years and never heard of such a thing. There on the rack was one from Billabong. My problem is, I wanted one without some logo - a near impossible quest I know but excuse me for my peculiarities. Local shops just in general plain suck, the service sucks, and the prices super suck.

    A really good post by TGThumbs. Thumbs up.....(couldn't help it, sorry)

    The reality is that it is simply about client service: the company that values your business will understand that doing whatever it takes, within reason, will earn the business. The 'Net allows all of us to reach the best shapers & the best surf shops in the world.

    I mentioned Rusty Surfboards in a previous post. Just a really impressive positive, professional, helpful attitude from the guys there. Others, like Austin (awesome dude, superb client care, gorgeous boards) are out there, too.

    It seems that too many 'local' surf shops are aimed at nailing the tourons to the wall on pricing. Maybe that's how some shops meet their overhead. But that m.o. won't generate repeat biz from the surfers who would / could be the local shop's core business.
    Last edited by yankee; Sep 21, 2012 at 04:44 AM.