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  1. #41
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    Jul 2012
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    jersey baby
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    are u serious? There were a total of 118 deaths due to malaria in the United States between 1979 and 1998 with an average of 5.9 deaths per year. Specific epidemiological data provided by the CDC regarding the 40 deaths that occurred between 1992 and 1998 yielded the following results. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12665001

    the banning of DDT forced us to find safer ways to cull the mosquito population.

    no one is saying the sky is falling. just trying to find safer ways to protect ourselves from the sun.
    Go out for half an hour a day without sun screen, prepping your skin for sun exposure. Don't stay inside all week and then go out on sunday for 6 hours.

  2. #42
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    jersey baby
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    sounds like you are the one who likes to claim the sky is falling

  3. #43
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    Apr 2008
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    In a state of flux
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    Quote Originally Posted by eastsandbarphil View Post
    are u serious? There were a total of 118 deaths due to malaria in the United States between 1979 and 1998 with an average of 5.9 deaths per year. Specific epidemiological data provided by the CDC regarding the 40 deaths that occurred between 1992 and 1998 yielded the following results. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12665001

    the banning of DDT forced us to find safer ways to cull the mosquito population.

    no one is saying the sky is falling. just trying to find safer ways to protect ourselves from the sun.
    Go out for half an hour a day without sun screen, prepping your skin for sun exposure. Don't stay inside all week and then go out on sunday for 6 hours.

    worldwide poindexter

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/5350068.stm

    South Africa was one country that switched, but it had to return to DDT at the beginning of the decade after mosquitoes developed resistance to the substitute compounds.

    "Of the dozen insecticides WHO has approved as safe for house spraying, the most effective is DDT," said Arata Kochi, director of the WHO's Global Malaria Programme.
    LOL, YOU make a baseless statement about sunscreen then say I'm chicken little. nice tactic but ineffective.

  4. #44
    Here is a great video from a surfer on making your own sunblock and also how foods you consume play a role in your outer health.

    Just a sweet video in general that motivated me to eat a little better and try making my own sunscreen.

    Video: Health Nuts Sunburn Basics Vid

  5. #45
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    Jul 2012
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    jersey baby
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    15
    I understand the dire situation in south africa has made it necessary to use this chemical. It is the lesser of two evils. You are missing the point. They did not approve it for outdoor spraying. They pretreat the walls and floors of homes. My point was that we in america have learned to keep malaria at bay without the use of a chemical that was at first thought to work wonders and then later found to be killing large populations of wildlife and contaminating soil.

  6. #46
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    Jul 2012
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    jersey baby
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    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/5145450.stm

    maybe u should read this article from the same site you linked earlier

  7. #47
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    Jul 2012
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    jersey baby
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    anyway DDT isn't what we are talking about here, I was just using it as an example of "useful" chemicals being dangerous. I use sunscreen sometimes. But usually I try to eat dark colored veggies, regularly expose my skin to the sun, and don't stay out for too long.

  8. #48
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    Aug 2012
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    Typical swellinfo d*ckhead
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    Birdwell Beach Britches, baby. Made right here. First time I called to order a pair the gal who answered the phone was yelling at her grandson to stop eating cookies. Get a pair tailored for you - color, size, print, inside color, etc. Not cheap, but cheaper then chinese made surfbrands (et al) who are telling you that you need your baggies to flex and stretch and come with a 1 inch wax comb or, (gasp) a zipper fly for 75 bucks which, as the OP said, cost Volcom or Quicksiver or whoever 5 bucks to make by 12 year old indentured servants. "Youth against the establishment my a$$". Come on now. They even call them "Boardshorts". THEY ARE TRUNKS OR BAGGIES. Boardshorts are for people in Iowa who get wet in chlorine.

  9. #49
    I posted a link to a pretty interesting article earlier in the thread, but not sure if anyone bothered to read it. The two ingredients in sunscreen that are in question are Oxybenzone & Retinyl palmitate. And the studies show that they are barely a risk...I'm sticking with my Waterman's.

    Oxybenzone provides effective broad-spectrum protection
    Oxybenzone is one of the few FDA-approved ingredients that provides effective broad-spectrum protection from UV radiation, and has been approved for use since 1978. “Available peer-reviewed scientific literature and regulatory assessments from national and international bodies do not support a link between oxybenzone in sunscreen and hormonal alterations, or other significant health issues in humans,” stated Dr. Siegel. “The FDA has approved oxybenzone in sunscreen for use on children older than six months, and dermatologists continue to encourage protecting children by playing in the shade, wearing protective clothing and applying broad-spectrum sunscreen.”

    Retinyl palmitate helps protect against aging
    Retinyl palmitate, is a form of vitamin A (retinol), but is not an active drug ingredient in sunscreen. When used in sunscreen, retinyl palmitate serves cosmetic purposes as an antioxidant to improve product performance against the aging effects of UV exposure, or to enhance product aesthetic qualities. Despite recent concerns from in vitro (test tube) studies and one unpublished report using mice, “topical and oral retinoids are widely prescribed to treat a number of skin diseases, such as acne and psoriasis, and there is no published evidence to suggest either increase the risk of skin cancer in these patients,” said Dr. Siegel. “In fact, oral retinoids are used to prevent skin cancers in high-risk patients such as those who have undergone organ transplantation.” Dr. Siegel also added that “unlike more potent prescription forms of vitamin A, there is no evidence to suggest that use of sunscreen with retinyl palmitate poses comparable risks.”

  10. #50
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    Jul 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by aka pumpmaster View Post
    So your OPINION, contrary to ZERO scientific evidence is to be taken as fact? I think your thetans are low.
    I was wrong, and I thank eastsandbarphil, Chris Meyers, Sewllinfo, and Koki Barrels for thier open minded informative responses.

    aka pumpmaster, Doctors and scientist used to recommend smoking cigarettes to soothe the throat. At the time there were no clinical studies available to show they caused cancer, or were in any way harmful to your health. It was not until people started getting sick from them that they admitted that they knew they were harmful, and major lawsuits ensued. To believe the "offical" truth is herd mentality. Like eastsandbarphil said, "instead of using logic and reason". Toxic laboratory made chemicals or natural materials? That's the choice to be made.

    When I started surfing, it was considered an activity for degenerate and drug addicts, and was looked down upon. I was considered an outcast, and was forced to think for myself. I am grateful for that experience.

    "Think For Yourself. Question Authority." -Dr. Timothy Leary