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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Ocean County NJ
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    The Song Each Bullet Sings

    While surfing on Thursday I met an Iraqi war veteran by the name of Matt Craw. He is a Marine and a super cool dude. I'm glad we got to share some waves. He told me about the book he wrote documenting his experience with Operation Iraqi Freedom. The book is called "The Song Each Bullet Sings". It's available on Amazon.com and Barnes&Noble.com. Check it out!
    Thank you veterans and people still serving for your service.
    http://www.amazon.com/The-Song-Each-...696075-0738717
    http://m.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-so...=9781936940547

  2. #2
    He's a poster on here!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Ocean County NJ
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    Quote Originally Posted by EmassSpicoli View Post
    He's a poster on here!
    Ha, I didn't know that. Did he mention his book already? If so, I clearly missed it and it's probably worth a repost anyway.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    highlands, nj
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    171
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    Holy shirt. Doug. Thanks man real cool of you. I feel the need to talk about your last wave that day. It was motivating. If anyone questions your ability on this forum I can tell them about the steep barrel you dropped into and rode in on. It was sick. Thanks so much for spreading the message.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    sea
    Posts
    923
    I remember that guy

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    VA Beach
    Posts
    654
    I plan on picking the book up at Barnes and Noble tomorrow, reading it and passing to my younger son. He's almost 19 and has been wanting to join the Marines since his junior year of high school. He had asthma when he was younger and the recruiter required him to complete some lengthy pulmonary tests that he ended up not doing well on. He's been really down in the dumps about that. I hate to see him depressed over the matter, but to be honest, as his dad, I wasn't enthusiastic bout him joining the Marines or the Army to begin with. I haven't encouraged him nor have I tried to discourage him. I was in the Navy, have a lot of respect for the Marines, and know quite a few. But when it comes to my own sons, I tell them to check out the other services before deciding. Of course, if does get into the Marines, I'll certainly support him.

  7. #7
    Sounds like a great book. Semper fi brother

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    highlands, nj
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    Dosxx, its only available online order right now but you can order it from barnesandnoble.com, and pick it up at the nearest store. I really appreciate the support. I understand your concern for your son, the Marine Corps saved my life, but there was a hefty price tag attached. I just tried to show America what being a Devil Dog during the war on terror is like. I tried to get people to understand a little bit more about why so many vets are messed up, long after returning from the fight. It's about my combat experience in Iraq but the message applies to veterans of all wars. Thanks for your navy service and good luck in whatever the future holds for you and your son. Stun 36- thanks man please spread the word, errah.
    Last edited by Mattyb; Mar 23, 2014 at 12:16 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    VA Beach
    Posts
    654
    My mom's older brother went into the Marines in early 1942, right after Pearl Harbor. Had to get my grandmother to sign her approval, since he was just 17. Went to boot camp instead of graduating from high school. That's how many guys did it back then under the circumstances.
    He was in some of the worse amphib invasions and battles of he Pacific: beginning with Guadalcanal I think (although that seems very early in the war), Tarawa, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa, but very miraculously survived the war. Some really horrifying experiences and extremely close calls that he rarely talked about.
    He came home deeply affected. Couldn't sit still, pacing, jittery, chain smoking, very heavy drinking. My mom said that he was a very smart and talented man, but the drinking and effects from the war really hurt him throughout his entire life and later affected his family, including his children, as well.

  10. #10
    Not to digress.... but its funny how there's such an emphasis on ptsd on the returning vets nowadays and for the guys in WW1 and WW2 and Vietnam, Korea, etc... there was no such thing. Those guys were just expected to keep it under their hat and deal with it. Those that had it the worst were just diagnosed with having "flash backs".

    I love watching the military channel and seeing footage and hearing stories about the past wars. Those guys back then were real men! The hardest of the hardcore! Unreal!!!!


    Back to the OP.... thankx for sharing man, I love reading stuff like that and am going to pick up a copy.