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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    VA BEACH
    Posts
    1,337
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    23
    id say a pod shape isnt a bad idea....i went from my longboards to my sweet potato which took a few days but it gave me a chance to get my "shortboard" basics down. it is performance oriented too. I then went and got a more performance shortboard for myself (more like big man shortboard)

  2. #12
    I say bite the bullet and get the board you really want. Commit to learning how to ride it. You learned to ride your other boards and you can learn to ride something else. You could spend years dropping down in 3 inch increments, mastering every step along the way, but what would be the point? You want to ride a short board, so get one.

  3. #13
    I say go for it. In my opinion, that POD you described is too big for you, but that is probably a good thing given your skill level, but I definitely wouldn't go any bigger.

    I say get a used fish/small wave board that is sized on the large size of appropriate for your weight, and have at it. It will be much different, but once it clicks, should be much more fun. Going too big on a fish style board is almost as bad as going to small on a board. It's gotta be sized within the right dimensions or it will feel "boaty" and hamper your surfing. Yes, bigger will catch waves easier, but it will surf like junk after you catch the wave.

    I find funshapes to be to be "not fun" unless I'm on a solid sized wave. Then you can draw some nice carves, but despite their size and extra float, I think they surf pretty poorly in the general smaller east coast conditions we get. I'll take a little fish or a longboard over a funshape every time for average waves.

    Grab something with a "fish genetics" (i.e. wide full nose, and a little portly through the outline) and my guess is you'll love it. Easier to catch waves then a shortboard and will float flat sections better too. Buy used and cheap. Ugly boards are your friends because their cheaper and surf just as good as the pretty ones.

    Then only break out your funshape when the waves are big and soft and provide a lot of face to carve.

    my 2 cents anyway....

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    sea
    Posts
    1,355
    Quote Originally Posted by shablagoo View Post
    I'm new to surfing (about 1 year), but in the last 2 months the addiction has really got me...3-5 days/week (after work and weekends), usually 2-3 hour sessions. Current board is a 6'9" x 21" x 2-3/4" hybrid funboard (pointy nose, full in the middle, rounded pintail, thruster). I'm 5'9", 160 lb (1.75m, 72.5kg).

    This board was beyond my skill level when I stubbornly got it (after 2 months on a foamie), but something clicked and I finally got a hang of it over the summer...more confident popups (no knees), transferring weight back-front (no sideways pumping though) to generate speed, gettin real low, carving long arcs. Local surf is usually small and mushy, knee high, occasionally chest high.

    Sooo, I'm wondering how much farther I can push the board given my size, its size, and the local surf. I have been tempted to get a shorter board so I can learn to maneuver quicker on it in small waves-- maybe something in the 6' - 6'4" range, 20"+ wide, fullish in the mid-section, fishy tail. But is it too soon? Should I be able to pull of sharp cutbacks, etc. on my current board first?

    Additionally, my board has been getting dinged pretty regularly, so it might be nice to have a second board to take out instead of sitting on the patio waiting for multiple curing stages -- filler, sanding, glass+resin, sanding, more resin...

    In particular, there is a Channel Islands Pod-style board in great condition, that I could get used for a steal. 6'0" x 20.5" x 2.5" quad-fin.

    Thoughts? Thanks in advance to those with constructive feedback.
    you surf 3-5x a week?!where the hell do u live,hawaii??if u surf that much,going to a smaller board should be no problem!maybe the issue is your surfing 1 ft whitewash that u can only surf on a longboard.have u surfed any real waves this year,like atleast over 4 ft.i see guys say all the time on here,asking for advice for carves n shyt,and i have to think,maybe ur not throwin spray because your tryin to carve on a 1 ft wave.you need wave face to cut back!!i havnt seen any real waves here in jersey just about all fukin summer.leslie was ok,but thats not real waves.i am lucky to only surf a few days a year,it sucks but thats the eastcoast.near me,the sandbars only come to life at a 4ft minimum..the rest of the year its flat,while southern breaks like lbi have nice sandbars so u can surf year round.not here in northern jersey breaks....make sure ur surfing waves and not whitewash,trust me youll learn theres a big difference between getting pushed by some whitewater and going over the falls on a 5ft barrel!......

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    South Shore, MA
    Posts
    179
    First off, good for you for catching the sickness! Keep surfing as often as you can regardless of whether others say the conditions are good. Strong onshore winds, mushy ankle to knee high junk waves, etc., they all will help you improve your surfing. That said, I agree you should ditch the "funboard". My first board was a 7' swallow tail that I only later found out was meant for larger waves (thanks local surf shop brahs), and it probably hurt my progression.

    One thing that hasn't been mentioned is that winter is coming. Transitioning to a smaller board and winter wetsuit at the same time is definitely going to slow down your paddling. Personally, I find myself riding my longboard a lot more often in winter for the ease of paddling and also to keep my body out of the frigid water (I live in MA). If most of the waves you're seeing are in the knee to waist range it might be worth considering a longboard. I should mention my local break is a point break that offers some steap bowly peaks but then mushes out fast and offers long lefts, which sometimes reform nicely but you really need a longboard to stay in them. Know your break! Long mushy waves=longboard. Short punchy waves=shortboard (IMO).

    I also ride a 5'8 hobie fish tail (I'm 6'1, 180 lbs). The transition to a small board ain't easy but you might as well do it now if that's the direction you want to take. I guess my point is that if you're committed to riding a shortboard then go for it! But if you're not committed to a shortboard there's a lot you can learn from riding an actual longboard. My longboard is a 9' Localmotion with a big aggressive single fin. I love both my boards, ride them about equally and, like parents with their children, probably couldn't pick a favorite.

    PS - I got the longboard first and once I started to feel some level mastery went for the shortboard. Just saying.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    bradenton
    Posts
    372
    Images
    6
    3 years of surfing here. 1st board was a 6'8 fun fish. I beat the hell out of it and then sold it it for 150......
    picked up a 6'6 with a more sleek design now, The fish I had was jus a tank in the water, this 6'6 is all around smaller every dimension! Much quicker....
    allright I gotta go flounder now, 3+ foot chop right now.............
    id jus get the new surf skis jk

  7. #17
    A longboard really is a solid addition to anyones quiver in my opinion. I started on a shortboard, but soon after I started picked up an old 60's longboard at a yard sale and had a ton of fun on that thing. It now lives permanently hanging on the wall of my basement, in such a way that you can't see the two buckles I put in it ;-) Even after it buckled, I bought a repl,acement and always have had at least one longboard around.

    That said, if you have interest in riding a shorter board, my advice is try not to fall into the crutch of only using a longboard because it's easier, and you get proficient at it quickly. I know many that have gone that route, especially now that I'm getting up there in years. Many of my buddies want to ride a shortboard, but after years of only taking out the log out of laziness, their shortboard skills are gone.

    Oh, and I second what Pinkstink said about riding any conditions you can. When I started I would try and surf any rideable day, no matter how small or junky or sideshore....It all helps you develop skills, and when your a beginner, it's all fun. You'll have plenty of time to become jaded and crotchity and only go on the better days when you get old, and have hardly any free time like me.

  8. #18
    Cool this all sounds like good wisdom so far...

    I find funshapes to be to be "not fun" unless I'm on a solid sized wave.
    Yeah I've been noticing that when the swells aren't great.

    you surf 3-5x a week?!where the hell do u live,hawaii??if u surf that much,going to a smaller board should be no problem!maybe the issue is your surfing 1 ft whitewash that u can only surf on a longboard.have u surfed any real waves this year,like atleast over 4 ft
    I drive 20-25min after work or weekends to a break that is, well, kinda moody, but can be pretty good at times, crappy a lot too. I wish I lived in HI. I stopped going for whitewash when I ditched the foamie. Mostly surfing knee to chest high waves that break pretty slowly.

    Keep surfing as often as you can regardless of whether others say the conditions are good. Strong onshore winds, mushy ankle to knee high junk waves, etc., they all will help you improve your surfing.
    Yes I'll keep doing that. Sometimes if there's nothing breaking, I'll just paddle around for exercise.

    Transitioning to a smaller board and winter wetsuit at the same time is definitely going to slow down your paddling.
    Last Saturday, I put on a 3/2 full wetsuit for the first time in like 6 months, (normally go either shorts or shorts+rashguard) and it def constricted my paddling when fully extending the arms. I thought it was fitted properly...maybe I'm just not hiking it up far enough (but there certainly isn't really any slack when i do hike it up)? or is that just the nature of wetsuits? I'm wondering if I can maybe ditch that one for an overalls-style suit (no arms)? I'm in SoCal but have a solid tolerance to cold so maybe I could get away with that in winter?

    I got the longboard first and once I started to feel some level mastery went for the shortboard
    A longboard really is a solid addition to anyones quiver in my opinion. I started on a shortboard, but soon after I started picked up an old 60's longboard at a yard sale and had a ton of fun on that thing.
    OK...maybe I'll look for some beater longboard for ~100 to fix up... for small days and so I can teach my GF to surf.

    From the rest of it, sounds like I should go for a 6'0" w/ full(ish) nose shortboard and decent thickness, and just be persistent learning it.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    15
    Hey Shablagoo,

    Hope you find a good board.

    But one thing's for sure. If it's an actual CI Pod, a 6'0" is too big for your weight.

  10. #20
    So the guy with the Pod is MIA or sold it, dunno, but some other interesting boards have popped up in my area for the right price...

    2 Merrick / CI Sashimis:

    one is 6'0 x 19 x 2 3/8 thruster
    other is 5'10 x 21.5 x 2.5 thruster

    also a Bing Whippet 5'11 x 20 x 2.75 twin fin

    any opinions on these boards? Some people have said that the 6'0 pod might be a little big for my size (5'9" / 160) so the smaller of the Sashimis sounds interesting since it is nice thickness and pretty wide.

    Thanks all.