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Thread: Crazy Talk?

  1. #1
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    Crazy Talk?

    Get a new board, scuff sand the top and lay an extra coat of resin across the whole deck.

    I’ve been considering this as a solution to board strength issues because I‘ve put my heel through a few decks and stomp out new boards pretty quickly. Air drops out of floaters without putting 20 stress cracks across the bottom of your board should be possible too. While riding a wave I like to be in focus, not worrying if my board is going to take a sh*t.

    Obviously weight will be added but will it really affect the boards performance? It’s not like 5 lbs or something. Sh*t, my winter wetsuit gear has to weigh 25 lbs wet. I know the pop will be affected but again, will the board perform poorly as a result? I don’t think so, but I don’t know for sure. I’ve always done well repairing my boards, but I don’t know sh*t about shaping or building them. I know it sounds nutty messing with a brand new board but, if the strength issues are resolved and performance isn’t sacrificed, why not?
    Last edited by Doug; Oct 19, 2012 at 12:56 PM.

  2. #2
    I would strongly advise against doing this. The main strength in the glass job doesn't come from the hotcoat of the board, but in the cloth lamination used. Most stock shortboards come with a single 4oz bottom & a double 4oz deck. If you are looking for more strength & don't mind a bit of added weight then you could order a board with 6oz cloth which will give you a bit more strength. I personally glass my boards with a 6oz & 4oz deck which has worked out well for me & i beat the crap out of boards.

    You also have to keep in mind the glass shop that is building the board. Channel Island uses about 3-4 different glass shops in the US so their is definitely changes in the quality based on which one glassed your board. Shops like Moonlight, Watermans Guild, & Michael Miller's shop do higher quality work because they spend more time per board. But most importantly it comes down to 2 things, the weight of the cloth used & who actually glassed the board.

  3. #3
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    it is the same thing as a gloss coat, the coat should be sanded smooth, why not just get a board with a gloss coat custom made? Also Gloss coats add 0 structural all of your strength comes from foam density and fiberglass, if you want a more ding resistant deck get a shaper to make you a custom with blue or Green density poly you could even go classic or black density but that is really heavy dense foam. or 2-3 lb density EPS Foam, Ask for 6/4 or 6/6 Deck maybe a deck patch as well.

  4. #4
    fiberglass has to be an even balance between resin / cloth content. What you intend to do will increase rigidity and could cause the top, newer layer or resin to crack all to sh*t when impacted/ flexed. If you want a heaver glass job, you need to step up the cloth along with the glass.

    in short, don't, it doesn't work like that
    Last edited by leethestud; Oct 19, 2012 at 02:02 PM.

  5. #5
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    A2 and Lee nailed it... it comes down to foam density and glass schedule, not hotcoat/glosscoat thickness. The glass is for tensile strength, the resin is for compression strength. You have to have the two in the right ratio to combine strengths and make up for each others' weaknesses. For impact resistance, try S glass instead of the standard E. In your case, I'd consider #2 pressure molded, superfused EPS with 6/6 deck, with or without heel patches in carbon fiber or even bamboo. Using 6oz all around will add about a half pound of weight if glassed, like Lee said, by an expert laminator. You can also strategically cut deck patches to save weight and add strength only where you need it. After that, your talking about some kind of timberflex construction or other vac bagged comp sand.
    Last edited by LBCrew; Oct 19, 2012 at 02:30 PM.

  6. #6
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    you could have your local ding guy or shaper add a deck patch...it's a bit of a drive, but jamie kelly does it pretty frequently.

  7. #7
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    I would not do this...

    I don't know how true this is, but i could testify to it with a board that i had.... i have heard it said that if you get a brand new board- right out of the shaping/glassing shop- that the boards resin may still be "green" and may need a few weeks/months to cure... maybe this could be your issue...

    If you really want more strength in your deck- it has to do with alot more then a hotcoat or even adding an extra layer of glass, like mentioned above.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the solid feedback guys. Anyone interested in a new 6’0’’ Merrick with a layer of sun cure across the deck? Kidding. Basically I need a heavier glass job from the get go. I guess I kind of new that but was looking for a way out of ordering boards. I never ordered boards and always leaned away from it because I feel like good shapers know what we want/need better than we do, and their stock models are probably their best boards. Plus if I break a board I don’t have to wait.
    I like the sound of a 6/4 deck. What about 6oz bottom and 6/4 top or 6/6 top? Too heavy? I ride 5’10’’s to 6’2’’s and am not Kolohe Andino. I feel like the extra board weight would give more drive, stability and smoother follow through on maneuvers? I’m pretty sure a good air guy (not me) could do all the same stuff on a heavier glassed board. Do we have light glass jobs simply to sell more boards? I don’t know about that because pros don’t buy boards and they get single layer 4oz decks I think.
    Thanks again for learning me some stuff.

  9. #9
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    everyone wants light strong boards, a 4/4 + 4 board is strong but every rider is different, most pro's use 4+4 single layer each side use them for a week use their next one. if you are not surfing in comps and you just want a board that will last go 6+6/6+4 deck 6 bot, (if you are not to rough on your boards go 4 bottom, your bottom really shouldn't be taking that much damage, your deck takes the brunt of it. ) Also what kind of boards are you riding, different boards usually are glassed differently. logs are usually glassed heavier with deck and tail patches, fish/eggs are usually glassed heavier than short boards, short boards are usually glassed light. but their is everything in between as well.

    Like i said, everyone has their preference with epoxy, poly, eps,weight, shape, size, fins, ect. you just need to find what is right for you for what you are looking to accomplish in your surfing.

  10. #10
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    Doug, like everyone else has said, you’re kind of S.O.L. on this board. My advice, RIDE HER HARD and beat the hell out of it dude. Somehow I knew that you were talking about a CI as soon as I read your first post. Most of the production boards I’ve owned seemed like they had been glassed for Barbie and she might be a little too fat arsed for half of them. I’ve busted every single CI I’ve ever had. They ride great, but I swear it’s like they love to snap or break off a fin box. The exception to all of this, my Coil, that thing is impressive. I’ve only taken it out when it’s pumping and I’ve had not one ding, pressure mark or heel dent. Hopefully I haven’t just jinxed it. I bought it used too, and it had gone to Indo and then the Mentawis before landing under me and it looked brand new. I’m taking it to the NS in another 5 weeks. My only complaint is that the super white finish picks up and shows off finger prints, bike grease, road dirt, finger paints, baby poo and any other gunk that’s floating around like nobody’s business. That and it’s so light I’m afraid that it’s going to blow away in a stiff breeze. Thing performs and floats me fine. You should check ‘em out, I’m a convert.

    I’m just a hobbyist, but for my backyard boards (I’ve only ever worked poly, cause that’s what I was taught), I’ve used either 2 6oz layers or 1 6oz and 1 4oz of S cloth for the deck. I’ve always put one layer of 6 on the bottom. Seems to work pretty well and I weigh in at 14 stone, have a heavy back foot and beat the crap out of my boards. The 2 6oz layers stand up, very few dents. The 6 and 4 so-so, a few more heel dents. I don’t even bother with 2 layers of 4oz., which I think is fairly standard for most production line boards. There’s a great thread on Sway going debating the merits of different types of glass, cloth weights and the number of layers. The consensus seemed to be (prolly need to read the thread again) that 3 layers of 4oz is stronger than 2 layers of 6, go with Volan or Warp and if you’re a Sasquatch throw an extra patch or two on it based on where you’re denting your other boards. Have to try that one out. Point of all this is, next time, don’t buy off the rack, a tailored suit is always the way to go. May or may not be more expensive, certainly takes longer; but as opposed to the Men’s/Surfboard Warehouse, you’re gonna like the way you look. Take one of your well used boards to your local shaper, show him where it’s taking the most damage and let him (or her I guess) go to town.