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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Orlando
    Posts
    6

    starting to shortboard?

    Hi there, I posted awhile back about riding unbroken waves on my 8'8 longboard. I have fixed the problem and almost never pearl. I also have taken drops fairly well My next question is that my friend has a 6'8 shortboard that he said i can use on sunday (there's supposed to be a nice swell moving through on that day). Should i attempt the shortboard? or just stick with my longboarding for right now?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Long Branch
    Posts
    368
    Images
    3
    dont do it

  3. #3
    Not a good idea. Stick with the equipment you are good with. Start shortboarding on a smaller day when it is safer. Be careful regardless if this is your first real hurricane.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Science mother****er
    Posts
    2,681
    So the first time you are ever going to try to ride a short board will be during a hurricane swell? I dunno man, doesn't seem smart. I can tell you going from a 9' LB to a 7'4" FB took a bit of practice. If you are going straight to a SB, I would wait for calmer conditions.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Promontorium Tremendum
    Posts
    972
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by rms126 View Post
    Hi there, I posted awhile back about riding unbroken waves on my 8'8 longboard. I have fixed the problem and almost never pearl. I also have taken drops fairly well My next question is that my friend has a 6'8 shortboard that he said i can use on sunday (there's supposed to be a nice swell moving through on that day). Should i attempt the shortboard? or just stick with my longboarding for right now?
    you should start shortboarding today. and post pics, please.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Stayin' Classy in San Diego
    Posts
    2,061
    I think one of the hardest things to learn in this life is patience. The same holds true with surfing. Standing up on a board in the white wash is easy, but that’s not SURFING. Really surfing and then getting good at it requires discipline, hard work and lots and lots of patience. It is not a quick nor easy road. Patience while surfing comes in many forms. Letting the surfer with superior position take the wave, getting into the best spot to catch the wave, knowing when to let a wave pass by, not taking off after every one of ‘em, not going after closeouts. As you progress in surfing and start paying more attention to the people around you who are good at it and begin to try to mimic them, you’ll notice that they all do the things I described above. For me, patience these days consists of taking one calm breath and centering myself mentally, right before I drop in. This occurs in the instant after I know that I have “caught the wave” and right before I pop up. I find that taking the extra breath calms my adrenaline fueled exuberance and allows me to clear my mind and focus everything on the wave, before I even start riding it. It is the same thing as holding your breath before squeezing the trigger.

    Another thing that comes with time is knowing when you’ve bit off more than you can chew. An experienced surfer looks at a break and knows the best spot to paddle out, where he or she will catch their wave and how they will ride it before they ever even get wet. This can all change on the fly, but this knowledge and the ability to adapt to the inevitable changes required only comes with experience. Can you do all that yet? Experienced surfers also know when not to paddle out. This is a hard thing to learn as it requires knowing and coming to terms with your own limitations, abilities and skill level. Going from longboarding to shortboarding takes time and a lot of hard work. Just sitting on a shortboard is completely different. The first time you try it, you’ll be slipping and sliding and that board will be flying out from under you and all over the place; just like everyone of us the first time we tried it. Surfing waves that will be bigger than anything you’ve ever surfed, which based on your previous posts, this storm is guaranteed to be, is a whole different ball game. Trying to do that on a board type you have no experience with would be extremely difficult, most likely foolish and possibly dangerous. Longboarding big waves, that’s no simple task either and requires a whole different skill set, can you duck dive a 9’6” through a breaking overhead set? If not, my advice is don’t paddle out, you’re not ready. If you do, don’t take your buddy’s board, you’ll break it. learn how to sit on a short board first. Then learn how to duck dive. Then catch a few waves on it on a nice easy day with some decent surf. Catch a few hundred waves on it. Then paddle out in the big stuff. This is good advice, trust me.

    However, when I was learning how to surf, I would NOT have taken it. I just paddled out in sh!1 I never should have and was too stupid not too and got beat up and broke boards and was (and still am) a KING of KOOKs. If you’re gonna be dumb you better be tough. Good Luck. Wish I was gonna be there.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    barefoot bay, FL
    Posts
    50
    as a noob myself i would say no. i'm gonna wait maybe till the swell goes down maybe wed/thurs if the conditions are cleaner. going from 8 foot foamie to 7'8" funboard i have to work on my popup all over again, its a lot less stable.
    Last edited by bilthy; Oct 26, 2012 at 07:32 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Crystal Coast,N.C.
    Posts
    400
    Images
    24
    Quote Originally Posted by zaGaffer View Post
    I think one of the hardest things to learn in this life is patience. The same holds true with surfing. Standing up on a board in the white wash is easy, but that’s not SURFING. Really surfing and then getting good at it requires discipline, hard work and lots and lots of patience. It is not a quick nor easy road. Patience while surfing comes in many forms. Letting the surfer with superior position take the wave, getting into the best spot to catch the wave, knowing when to let a wave pass by, not taking off after every one of ‘em, not going after closeouts. As you progress in surfing and start paying more attention to the people around you who are good at it and begin to try to mimic them, you’ll notice that they all do the things I described above. For me, patience these days consists of taking one calm breath and centering myself mentally, right before I drop in. This occurs in the instant after I know that I have “caught the wave” and right before I pop up. I find that taking the extra breath calms my adrenaline fueled exuberance and allows me to clear my mind and focus everything on the wave, before I even start riding it. It is the same thing as holding your breath before squeezing the trigger.

    Another thing that comes with time is knowing when you’ve bit off more than you can chew. An experienced surfer looks at a break and knows the best spot to paddle out, where he or she will catch their wave and how they will ride it before they ever even get wet. This can all change on the fly, but this knowledge and the ability to adapt to the inevitable changes required only comes with experience. Can you do all that yet? Experienced surfers also know when not to paddle out. This is a hard thing to learn as it requires knowing and coming to terms with your own limitations, abilities and skill level. Going from longboarding to shortboarding takes time and a lot of hard work. Just sitting on a shortboard is completely different. The first time you try it, you’ll be slipping and sliding and that board will be flying out from under you and all over the place; just like everyone of us the first time we tried it. Surfing waves that will be bigger than anything you’ve ever surfed, which based on your previous posts, this storm is guaranteed to be, is a whole different ball game. Trying to do that on a board type you have no experience with would be extremely difficult, most likely foolish and possibly dangerous. Longboarding big waves, that’s no simple task either and requires a whole different skill set, can you duck dive a 9’6” through a breaking overhead set? If not, my advice is don’t paddle out, you’re not ready. If you do, don’t take your buddy’s board, you’ll break it. learn how to sit on a short board first. Then learn how to duck dive. Then catch a few waves on it on a nice easy day with some decent surf. Catch a few hundred waves on it. Then paddle out in the big stuff. This is good advice, trust me.

    However, when I was learning how to surf, I would NOT have taken it. I just paddled out in sh!1 I never should have and was too stupid not too and got beat up and broke boards and was (and still am) a KING of KOOKs. If you’re gonna be dumb you better be tough. Good Luck. Wish I was gonna be there.


    Brings back memories of my first day out as a young kook.........6' low tide fast peeling barrels.......Got my A** handed to me many times over. Was an awesome experience but...........If your a noob to a short wait for a smaller day.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Stayin' Classy in San Diego
    Posts
    2,061
    Quote Originally Posted by wave1rider65 View Post
    Brings back memories of my first day out as a young kook.........6' low tide fast peeling barrels.......Got my A** handed to me many times over. Was an awesome experience but...........If your a noob to a short wait for a smaller day.
    I'm still learning how to surf every time I paddle out. Ain't it beautiful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    South Shore, MA
    Posts
    182
    As long as the waves aren't crazy big, I would say go for it! There's no better time than the present to learn. You'll probably get your ass kicked but so what?! If it is big, then you're better off with a short board for duck diving purposes anyways. Like zaGaffer, I always paddled out in the big stuff when I was learning to surf. It was definitely stupid, but it also helped my progression. One of my biggest challenges surfing has always been getting psyched out about surfing big waves. But every time I go out there in challenging conditions I progress. Obviously be smart and go with someone who is more experienced, but don't miss out on good waves because you don't think you're ready to rip it yet.