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Thread: Board Help

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Long Beach Island.
    Posts
    17

    Board Help

    I'm going to get a new board, just not sure about the size to get... I surf Jersey in the summer which is generally small and get down a few times in the fall-spring. Does a 6'6 sound good. Any help would be great.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Skimdude10 View Post
    I'm going to get a new board, just not sure about the size to get... I surf Jersey in the summer which is generally small and get down a few times in the fall-spring. Does a 6'6 sound good. Any help would be great.
    Well, How much do you weigh?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Manasquan
    Posts
    303
    Images
    6
    what are your specs, what are you currently riding, what do you want to do as far as surfing?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Science mother****er
    Posts
    2,795
    I would recommend a funshape or LB if you will be surfing mostly small stuff. As for the size, as others have noted, we need to know your weight. I am 5'8" 160 lbs and ride a 7'4" funboard in the small stuff. I am going to buy a 6'10" Egg soon for larger swell.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Long Beach Island.
    Posts
    17
    Im about 5'11 175

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,779
    Quote Originally Posted by Skimdude10 View Post
    Im about 5'11 175
    Don't know what skill level you are, but assuming you're just getting started i'd go with a 7.6" - 8ft Fun board, or if you are already catching waves frequently then maybe get a Fish in the 6'6" - 6'10" range. I'm about your weight, slightly shorter, and ride a 8'1" McTavish and a 6'10" WRV Fish, and they are perfect for me, catch almost every wave i go for so i'll be going to a true shorty later this winter i believe, in the 6'4"-6'6" range, but I am trying to hold out a little while longer to make the transition easier.

  7. #7
    If you're already considering a 6'6", I would bump up to a 7'+ single fin. A 7' is a great medium between a shortboard & a smaller longboard/funboard, as long as you go for the more rounded nose. You will have plenty of float for the ankle biters & the board will be more maneuverable than a longboard/funboard in larger surf. Plus, the 7' single egg is a classic staple in surfing culture. Definitely a great all around board. Best of luck in the search.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    East of AC
    Posts
    76
    Quote Originally Posted by dlrouen View Post
    If you're already considering a 6'6", I would bump up to a 7'+ single fin...
    Why a single fin ? I have two single fin boards and don't really see the advantage for a beginner. I think a thruster set up would be more user friendly. If the OP is a beginner, I'd agree with the others and go with a fun shape. Maybe 7'6" range.

  9. #9
    What is your ability?

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Inland View Post
    Why a single fin ? I have two single fin boards and don't really see the advantage for a beginner. I think a thruster set up would be more user friendly. If the OP is a beginner, I'd agree with the others and go with a fun shape. Maybe 7'6" range.
    Hey man, I'm not forcing this dude into buying a single fin - it is simply a suggestion based on my personal experience. Nothing about the OP's post insinuates that he is a beginner - the only thing we know is that he is considering a 6'6" - obviously not a typical beginner board. By all means, a funboard is a lot of fun - I have one myself, but I think we can all agree that a funboard will not yield the same results as a 6'6". Sure, a single fin is not a thruster & it's the same vice versa. A thruster is a combination of a twin & a single, but it still lacks the stability of a single fin. Additionally, a thruster has a lot of drag - something that may complicate things for a beginner. A single fin set-up provides a smoother ride & offers more stability than a thruster does, with little-to-no drag. From a historical point of view, the single fin is the original - the classic - the mac daddy of fin set-ups. The single fin allows the rider to go with the flow & ride the wave for what it really is. If the OP is really a beginner, the single fin will teach him style & finesse of true classic surfing. From there, you can go anywhere; including a thruster set up or even a quad set-up - you could even look at single fins as the "stick-shift" of surfboards. Style & grace over airs & modernization - restore the power.