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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Eastern Shore
    Posts
    365
    Images
    2
    Hurricane Bill in Buxton, NC.

  2. #32
    another...

    Like two weeks ago I decided to go surf first street (...VB). Almost got run over by a pontoon boat and two jet ski's. It was 2-3ft.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    508
    Agree with the Ocean Beach/Moss Landing guys. It gets crazy out there!

    My scariest *moments* were all in Hawaii paddle-outs, but more because of huge freak sets than the setup's themselves. I usually found the paddle-outs to be quite comfortable, even on the big days, so long as I scouted the terrain before getting in the water. That was actually a curse in some ways, because it was easy to get in WAY over my head at a time when my false confidence often surpassed the skillz.

    All in all, however, it's still those Jan-March days in good ole MD, when the waves are barely overhead but the water frigid, the air even colder, and the winds howling. I get so cold duck-diving that I literally feel my sanity leaving the body. Sometimes I'll start screaming profanity because it's just so damn agonizingly cold and I don't know what else to do about it...probably really funny for those watching, but whatever.

  4. #34
    [QUOTE=zaGaffer;147936]How do you think people get guns or long boards out into big waves? I don't know how tall or strong you are or how much you weigh; but it doesn't matter, just about anyone can duck dive just about any board. It's a question of mechanics, not muscle.

    hey i have a 6'8" board and i weigh 150.. i cannot seem to duck dive i just get the nose into the water and it wont go down anymore..

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
    Posts
    3,969
    Try tipping it over on it's side and driving the rail down and under with like a scooping motion. That gets the nose down... then use your foot to sink the tail as best you can. This technique works best when approaching the oncoming wave at an angle.

  6. #36
    This is a fun thread, I've never had the pleasure of an Ocean Beach thrashing but as a long boarder, have had a few days where you can't believe how far and long you have to paddle. I can recall several days at Boca Barranca where if you don't find the right gap, you are thrashing through some very push long-period swell. The bigger it is the farther out it breaks, so you're talking about quite the ridiculous paddle. Probably 1,000 paddle strokes on a longboard to get outside. It is a point break so you have the alternative of paddling around the break, but that can be 1/2 mile.
    For me, my most memorable paddle out was an October day at Assateague, MD. It was a hurricane swell and I stood on the beach with a couple of buddies intimidated by the walls of whitewater pushing across the trough and then re-forming to create some incredible shore pound. After watching for a while we decided to suit up and head out. I was a relative newby, had been surfing a lot that year, but not for a long time. I saw what I thought was a gap and started to head out and suddenly I went from being in thigh deep water to being on dry sand and looked up to a huge shorebreak wave that detonated on top of me flinging me and my board up onto the beach.
    I've always been a bit hard-headed (ask my wife) so I picked up my board and chose another gap and started paddling. When the first wall of whitewater hit me, I couldn't believe the power in the water and how it thrashed my body as I tried to fight through it. I kept digging hard to get outside as my heart pounded. I was almost completely out of gas and almost outside, when my buddy Hank looks over and yells that a cleanup set was coming. I dug deep and put my chin down and gave it everything I had left to scratch for the horizon. I made the first two waves of the set but the third wave loomed large and looked like I was a goner. I was totally spent yet found a way to keep paddling and just as I was cresting the top I felt as if my leash was tugging me backwards. With two last strokes I broke loose from the grasp and was outside.
    I was completely exhausted and wound up sitting outside for an hour before I had the gumption to try catching some waves. I wound up getting some nice rides before I broke my board and had to swim the two pieces in. My buddy Hank graciously offered to loan me a board, but I declined and went birding the rest of the afternoon.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Wilmington
    Posts
    2,275
    Duppies, Barbados @ 10+ feet. The currents are weird out there even when its smaller, this was insane with waves breaking through the channel and a constant current trying to draw you back into the cliffs of death. I even got knocked back on my ass in the keyhole trying to punch through the 6' Waimea shorebreak-esque craziness.

    If you've seen it that big out there, you know what I'm talking about.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    287
    Big Nor'easter swells in New England are definitely brutal for the cold alone, but the worst I've taken was definitely at Punta de Lobos, Chile - double overhead+ with strong onshore flow keeping you pinned into the rocks by the El Mirador section. Spent 30 minutes plus duckdiving waves while essentially stationary, less than 20 feet off the rocks, before finally getting a window and sneaking through a 3-foot wide gap between rocks and getting into the open ocean on the inside.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    508
    Quote Originally Posted by newenglandflatness View Post
    Big Nor'easter swells in New England are definitely brutal for the cold alone, but the worst I've taken was definitely at Punta de Lobos, Chile - double overhead+ with strong onshore flow keeping you pinned into the rocks by the El Mirador section. Spent 30 minutes plus duckdiving waves while essentially stationary, less than 20 feet off the rocks, before finally getting a window and sneaking through a 3-foot wide gap between rocks and getting into the open ocean on the inside.
    I have to ask, how were those waves at Punta de Lobos? Ever since seeing Jerry and Jack cruise those lefts in "A Broke Down Melody", I've been wanting to surf that place. I actually had a trip planned a few years ago and then opted for Hawaii at the last minute due to passport issues. Anyhow, I just don't know any east coaster's who have been there and am curious as to what you thought about the place. Cheers.
    Last edited by live aloha; Nov 30, 2012 at 05:40 PM. Reason: CAPT Grammar-Pants.

  10. #40
    pascuales mexico on a big day. that wave is scary as hell and jacks up out of the middle of nowhere. snapped 3 boards in one day.
    locally i would say a reef around here which detached my bicept on the paddle out walking on rocks and the board got ripped out of my hand i tried to hold on to it which cranked my arm back and now my bicept looks like i do curls all day (it turned into a positive)