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  1. #11
    if you want to see how dunes work compare Bradley Beach to Belmar after the storm.
    Bradley had 20' high dunes which were started in 2001 with wooden snow fencing and recycled Christmas trees. The dunes were full of grasses and dune vegetation too, like a fortified wall of sand.
    Their huge dunes saved the boardwalk and much of the ocean front properties. The dunes got wiped out by the storm but they served their purpose.
    Belmar had these little 3' dunes next to their boardwalk, more like landscaping areas. Now they have no boardwalk and the town suffered extensive flooding and damage. They are already talking about building the same silly little boardwalk, and maybe putting in a sea wall as well...complete waste of 16 million dollars.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by downeast View Post
    The ASP and Rip Curl did not choose Long Beach randomly for the Search Event. It was chosen based on research that revealed the bottom topography of the sea floor in this region focusing swell onto this small stretch of beach creating larger waves in Long Beach than other beaches.

    I think Surfline did one of their wave mechanic pieces on Long Beach. Check it out.

    If ACOE blames locals for not heeding their recommendations they are jumping to conclusions as they have done in so many of their other projects along the east coast. Many of these other projects resulted in loss of beaches and created the depressing cycle of beach replenishment projects up and down the coast.

    It is inexcusable and irresponsible to blame the locals for the destruction. It is unlikely that a puny fifteen foot sand dune would have made a bit of difference.

    The conditions that resulted in the destruction were in place long before Long Island was even inhabited.
    The dunes would have saved Long Beach from much of the destruction. The locals should absolutely take some heat for the damages for not allowing a proper dune system to be constructed.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    MD - VA
    Posts
    4,274
    Sadly, we will see moronic government behavior. They learn nothing. But, more so, that behavior will be predicated upon the needs of the developers. The history of coastal development in the USA is steeped in money, money, money. Your money, my money, every taxpayer's money.

    The developers pressured Congress to pass the coastal insurance underwriting laws in the 1960's. Ever since then it's been concrete & wood on the shore, the best view of the ocean is the driving force. The governments will recreate this fake, fragile, destined to be destroyed world over & over & over.

    And you & I & our children will pay for it for decades to come.

    The system is so broken....so broken....

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Ocean County NJ
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    1,252
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    Maybe we should stop being so cocky and retreat as needed. It would cost much less for the government to buy out properties as they are overtaken by the sea rather than push sand around for the next 25 years. Ocean front/ bay front homes are ignorantly placed closely as possible to the water, yet we expect them to stay intact when a big storm hits. Every coast line worldwide was shaped by erosion and planetary mayhem not by government. Pick up a handful of sand the next time you go to the beach and ask yourself what exactly it is. Answer; finely ground ROCKS. Coastal erosion isn’t tragic it’s natural and has been going on for billions of years. The tragic part is our ignorance and lack of respect for the ocean. Are we really trying to influence how the ocean works at the shoreline? That’s crazy as sh*t if you think about it. Rather than realizing our dumb mistakes, we just blame it on the sea (giver of life) and sh*tty up her once beautiful coastlines. Wow.
    I attached a pic of a natural beach front in NJ. It’s easy to see the lack of Sandy damage here. I wonder why……………. NOT!
    lbi.jpg

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    In a state of flux
    Posts
    3,336
    LOL!!


  6. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    East of AC
    Posts
    76
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug View Post
    Maybe we should stop being so cocky and retreat as needed. It would cost much less for the government to buy out properties as they are overtaken by the sea rather than push sand around for the next 25 years. Ocean front/ bay front homes are ignorantly placed closely as possible to the water, yet we expect them to stay intact when a big storm hits. Every coast line worldwide was shaped by erosion and planetary mayhem not by government. Pick up a handful of sand the next time you go to the beach and ask yourself what exactly it is. Answer; finely ground ROCKS. Coastal erosion isn’t tragic it’s natural and has been going on for billions of years. The tragic part is our ignorance and lack of respect for the ocean. Are we really trying to influence how the ocean works at the shoreline? That’s crazy as sh*t if you think about it. Rather than realizing our dumb mistakes, we just blame it on the sea (giver of life) and sh*tty up her once beautiful coastlines. Wow.
    I attached a pic of a natural beach front in NJ. It’s easy to see the lack of Sandy damage here. I wonder why……………. NOT!
    lbi.jpg
    Well said.

  7. #17

    dunes???

    I live in Long Beach...dunes would have done nothing to prevent what occurred. Look at Ocean Pkway for example, all those dunes are gone, flattened....