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  1. #11
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    Sep 2009
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    Crystal Coast,N.C.
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    Well let me know how they work out for ya Brah.....

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Wilmington
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    Quote Originally Posted by Exit98Surf View Post
    Did he actually say dimpled bottom, or just new technology? THE place to find Coil info is on the Swaylocks Coil Ride Reports forum, and there's been no mention of it...
    I don't know if you have checked, but Mike responded, "plead the fifth."
    I was not told this was anything top secret and I'm pretty sure Mike knows my buddy well enough to know he surfs with some serious shape and design geeks (like myself). I know you can't cover a board with swirly stickers like they do prototype cars (especially in this case... how would you be able to tell if it works?), so how does a shaper get out prototypes and betas (which I'm pretty sure this board is far beyond the test phase in their experimentation) without causing mumblings between people?

    What I'm getting at is this: I hope I did not commit a faux pas in my excitement and let a cat, kitten, puppy, salamander, etc.. out of a bag too soon. I have a huge amount of respect for Mike and what he does and surely do not intend to step on any toes. Nor is my intent to say "hey guys, look what I saw FIRST! Na na na na na naaahhhhh!" My intent is to give a revolutionary a "goodonyamate" and hopefully generate more orders for him.

    Anyway, if I was premature I'm sure someone will let me know.


    Philo, you mention how you would imagine this tech would show up in other applications..... Look into racing sailboats (small and large) and accessories there for (rudders, foils, etc). There you will see some crossover with this tech.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    Stayin' Classy in San Diego
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    I keep wondering, how would you sand it? Would you have to sand each one of the holes individually? Oh man, that would suck. I've read Bert Berger's vacuum bagging thread on Sway’s twice and my head exploded each time. It’s so far removed from any way I’ve ever seen a board made (I need to get out more). I keep imagining that the Coil Crew must have bumps on the matt thingy that they are laying the cloth on and then using the vacuum to impress the bumps into the blank. Or maybe, they really are getting help from the flying saucer crowd. I don’t know. I keep picturing people riding dimpled boards, with fins covered in dimples. The wetsuit companies better catch on quick.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by PhiloSurfer View Post
    Hahahaha! Some of you may be old enough to remember that dimple-bottomed boards have been tried before... in the late 80s!! (with less than stellar results)

    The problem is that the same principle of lift that applies to golf balls does not translate directly to planing surfaces. If this were the case, you could be sure that ship and boat builders would already be designing all of our vessels with dimpled bottoms.

    Thinking about fins similarly, one would think that this design would've already popped up in other applications. It still seems to me that foil is more critical to the lift/drag ratio. Nevertheless, more power to these guys. I'm always in favor of folks trying to find ways to advance our sport. On the flip side, it'd be a shame for a company to take advantage of folks lack of knowledge, intending to make their money selling a "gimmick" that in no way advances our craft.

    It'd be great if someone affiliated with 3Dfins could post with more explanation of how they think the dimples are helping. Same with anyone proposing to bring back dimple-bottomed boards.

    Merry Christmas Dudes!


    While the bottoms of boats and ships aren't "dimpled", the anti-fouling bottom paint provides this texture. If you have ever touched the bottom of a boat, it is anything but smooth. There are new bottom paints coming out that actually increase the "roughness" of the finished coat, to add more "lift".

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Wilmington
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    Gaff: I'm not sure how much sanding really has to be done on any of their boards when they come out of the bag. Your idea of how it is achieved seems plausible enough for me, but I never trust Space Coasters to come up with something as simple as that--just not challenging enough for 'em. Being a carpenter I have had experiences with vac bags in doing large laminate glue-ups like putting veneers on something or making your own laminates (think home-made plywood). I do know that whatever Libtech is doing with their new boards makes it so they don't have to sand them, but I have never seen a vac bag in action in a board building application.

    fins: Lest I go too far on a tangent in relation to your post. There was a thread a little over a year ago or something that regarded sanding the bottom of your board and the best grit to do it with. LBCrew had some great info in that one. And speaking in a broader sense of hydrodynamics and boats--the Stepped Hull. Of course there probably isn't any cross application into surfboard design, but it greatly increases lift, speed and economy. Plus the design was pioneered by the NC-based and home-grown godfathers of performance boat building, Reggie Fountain.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Wilmington
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    Gaff: I'm not sure how much sanding really has to be done on any of their boards when they come out of the bag. Your idea of how it is achieved seems plausible enough for me, but I never trust Space Coasters to come up with something as simple as that--just not challenging enough for 'em. Being a carpenter I have had experiences with vac bags in doing large laminate glue-ups like putting veneers on something or making your own laminates (think home-made plywood). I do know that whatever Libtech is doing with their new boards makes it so they don't have to sand them, but I have never seen a vac bag in action in a board building application.

    fins: Lest I go too far on a tangent in relation to your post. There was a thread a little over a year ago or something that regarded sanding the bottom of your board and the best grit to do it with. LBCrew had some great info in that one. And speaking in a broader sense of hydrodynamics and boats--the Stepped Hull. Of course there probably isn't any cross application into surfboard design, but it greatly increases lift, speed and economy. Plus the design was pioneered by the NC-based and home-grown godfathers of performance boat building, Reggie Fountain.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Erock View Post
    Philo, you mention how you would imagine this tech would show up in other applications..... Look into racing sailboats (small and large) and accessories there for (rudders, foils, etc). There you will see some crossover with this tech.
    I did a little checking and found more and more debate. Swaylocks has some good discussion, so do several sailing threads. Most of what I'm reading from reputable sources seems to indicate that the intended effect of reducing drag/increasing speed is minuscule at best when applied to small, slow moving planing surfaces (like surfboards/fins). The "worst" case scenario suggests that the effect is the reverse of that which is intended, increasing drag. Having witnessed it 1st-hand, I can say that the BIG dimple bottomed boards of the late 80s & 90s fell into this category. I hope and pray that no board-builder is trying to bring these dogs back from the grave.
    1028388_dimple.jpg

    What seems to be missing from the debate is any engineering or scientific literature discussing testing methodologies and results. My guess is that, for the surfing industry, it's not worth the expense of rigorously testing a prototype in order to verify and document the claimed improvements. It's much easier & less expensive (even profit-making) to user test the technology and let the market decide. To use the old saying, "Just keep throwing s#@t against the wall and see what sticks."

    Like wave1rider65 and others, I think I'll sit this one out and see what happens... Hell, maybe we'll all have a Titleist in our quivers one day!

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    Stayin' Classy in San Diego
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erock View Post
    Gaff: I'm not sure how much sanding really has to be done on any of their boards when they come out of the bag. Your idea of how it is achieved seems plausible enough for me, but I never trust Space Coasters to come up with something as simple as that--just not challenging enough for 'em. Being a carpenter I have had experiences with vac bags in doing large laminate glue-ups like putting veneers on something or making your own laminates (think home-made plywood). I do know that whatever Libtech is doing with their new boards makes it so they don't have to sand them, but I have never seen a vac bag in action in a board building application.

    fins: Lest I go too far on a tangent in relation to your post. There was a thread a little over a year ago or something that regarded sanding the bottom of your board and the best grit to do it with. LBCrew had some great info in that one. And speaking in a broader sense of hydrodynamics and boats--the Stepped Hull. Of course there probably isn't any cross application into surfboard design, but it greatly increases lift, speed and economy. Plus the design was pioneered by the NC-based and home-grown godfathers of performance boat building, Reggie Fountain.
    HEY YOU GUYS!


    Chunk: Listen, okay? You guys'll never believe me. There was two cop cars, okay? And they were chasing this four-wheel deal, this real neat ORV, and there were bullets flying all over the place. It was the most amazing thing I ever saw!
    Mikey: More amazing than the time Michael Jackson come over to your house to use the bathroom.
    Brandon Walsh: More amazing than the time you saved those old people from that nursing home fire, right?
    Mouth: Yeah, and I bet it was even more amazing than the time you ate your weight in Godfather's pizza, right?
    Chunk: Okay, Brand. Michael Jackson didn't come over to my house to use the bathroom. But his sister did.


    Look what I found on Sway's:
    http://www2.swaylocks.com/forums/coi...it-done?page=3

    The paradigm has shifted.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by wave1rider65 View Post
    I concur.....Wouldn't dimples on a planning surface catch water, making bubbles which would in turn cause drag???
    the small dimples cause areas of cavitation to occur, vaporizing water into air in it's path (seen as little white bubbles). Sometimes this can be a good thing. Resistance though air is less than water. If you can use the effect of caviation to your advantage, you can basically ride under water in a bubble. It's actually one of those cool things that man learned from nature, watch some youtube videos of dolphins creating air pockets and riding in them. It's amazing. Now the navy uses it for making underwater torpedo's and **** go faster. Cavitation that is, not dimples...

    The way the golf ball works is similar, not only do the dimples regulate spin but also tiny areas of turbulence form in the dimples all around the ball causing it to "float".

    har har
    Last edited by leethestud; Jan 11, 2013 at 06:35 PM.

  10. #20
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    Mar 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by leethestud View Post
    the small dimples cause areas of cavitation to occur, vaporizing water into air in it's path (seen as little white bubbles). Sometimes this can be a good thing. Resistance though air is less than water. If you can use the effect of caviation to your advantage, you can basically ride under water in a bubble. It's actually one of those cool things that man learned from nature, watch some youtube videos of dolphins creating air pockets and riding in them. It's amazing. Now the navy uses it for making underwater torpedo's and **** go faster. Cavitation that is, not dimples...

    The way the golf ball works is similar, not only do the dimples regulate spin but also tiny areas of turbulence form in the dimples all around the ball causing it to "float".

    har har
    I can't wait to see what one of these looks like on a wave from the underwater viewpoint.