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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Charleston
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    The Cruise of the Snark by Jack London.

    Jack London was surfing with the native Hawaiians in 1911 before it was cool.

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Agabinet View Post
    +1 for Tapping the Source, best surf novel ever written. Same author, Kem Nunn, wrote another novel with surfing called Tortilla Flats. Check out Tim Winton's Breath, another great NOVEL about surfing by one of Australia's best living authors. Weisbecker's Captain Zero is another great read and Kook definitely made me want to give it all up, move to Baja and . . . marry a beautiful Asian girl who also surfs! The Wave is a combination of nonfiction about rogue waves and every other chapter is an adoration of Laird Hamilton.

    Isn't there one called "Caught Inside" or "Trapped Inside?" That was a NON novel.
    I liked Tijuana Straits by Kem Nunn also...

  3. #33
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    Aug 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by ClemsonSurf View Post
    The Cruise of the Snark by Jack London.

    Jack London was surfing with the native Hawaiians in 1911 before it was cool.
    Surfing or native hawaiians?

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Ryukyu Islands
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    524
    With The Old Breed, EB Sledge
    Good call +1...Also Helmet for My Pillow R. Leckie...if you're going down that road not as dark as Old Breed or Thin Red LineJ. Jones... really dark/ disturbing... Pacific WW2 History was my major in college... those books are close to my heart ...my great uncle I spent a lot of time with growing up was 1st Marine Division from 1942 through Korea and Vietnam.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Manisses View Post
    Surfing or native hawaiians?
    I guess both...it was actually 1907 though. My bad. The book isn't about surfing but London's trip on the Snark. His description of surfing is a highlight of the book.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Long Beach Township
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    232
    waves and beaches by willard bascom is really good if you want to get technical as he explains a lot concerning the ocean

  7. #37
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    Aug 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stranded in Smithfield View Post
    Good call +1...Also Helmet for My Pillow R. Leckie...if you're going down that road not as dark as Old Breed or Thin Red LineJ. Jones... really dark/ disturbing... Pacific WW2 History was my major in college... those books are close to my heart ...my great uncle I spent a lot of time with growing up was 1st Marine Division from 1942 through Korea and Vietnam.
    Its an unpayable debt we owe those men and women.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stranded in Smithfield View Post
    Good call +1...Also Helmet for My Pillow R. Leckie...if you're going down that road not as dark as Old Breed or Thin Red LineJ. Jones... really dark/ disturbing... Pacific WW2 History was my major in college... those books are close to my heart ...my great uncle I spent a lot of time with growing up was 1st Marine Division from 1942 through Korea and Vietnam.
    Why would you major in Pacific WWII History? What kind of job do you have now? Military Lawyer?

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    Stayin' Classy in San Diego
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    Since this has gone off pure surfing books and into the realm of military history, I offer:
    Anything by Shelby Foote or Bruce Catton

    “The Guns of August” by Barbara Tuchman, you want to know about WWI, read this.

    John Keegan's "The Face of Battle: A Study of Agincourt, Waterloo, and the Somme " one of my all time favorites. A book about why these battles were important and how they affected modern warfare.

    "Sagittarius Rising" by Cecil Lewis, a WWI combat ace who was described by my favorite playwright George Bernard Shaw (next to the immortal bard and thank you Mrs. Malaprop) as "a thinker, a master of words, and a bit of a poet". I’ve read through two copies of this book since I was a teenager. I’ve only gone through more copies of Dune and Ender’s Game. Very sad and very beautiful book, same as the next one.

    "Tumult in the Clouds" by James "Goody" Goodson; one of the best accounts of WWII ETO aerial warfare there is, by a man who joined the RAF and took part in the BoB all the way to post D-Day operation until he was interned in a German P.O.W. camp. Amazing guy.

    The Ghost Mountain Boys: Their Epic March and the Terrifying Battle for New Guinea--The Forgotten War of the South Pacific – James Campbell; you will hate MacArthur by the end of this.

    We Were Soldiers Once… And Young by Lt. Gen. Harold G. Moore; very entertaining read. Amazing story of how a regiment with terrible ground took on a division with good ground and didn’t get wiped off the map. The redemption of the 7th cav one could call it.

  10. #40
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    Jan 2010
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    Why would you major in Pacific WWII History? What kind of job do you have now? Military Lawyer?
    Major: History. Focus: WW2... in particular pacific theater (everyone has a focus...something they are constantly researching and writing about for grades, academic journals, professional conferences, and eventually a thesis) Job I got from this endeavor in particular: none...but I was a double major with education so I taught school for a few years. I did however travel to some cool places and 10-12 years ago when there were considerably more WW2 vets around, interviewed some amazing people... a USS Indianapolis (look that one up) survivor comes to mind...surfers maybe can in a small way grasp that one better than the general public