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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Southern Mass
    Posts
    18
    Hey so I have had alot of problems trying to duck dive too in the past as I am 5'2" 116 lbs and honestly try a thinner board. I have a 5'11" thats 18 3/8 and I can get it under pretty easily. People forget volume (thickness) of the board can impact how it handles more so than the length. Good Luck, hope this helps.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Richmond,VA
    Posts
    29
    I think stay salty had it right. Push the nose down and lift a leg way up while hooking the other foot on the trac pad. Do it right before the wave comes, otherwise you float back up just when the wave hits you and get pushed back, which is exactly what you were trying to avoid.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    yonder
    Posts
    165
    Quote Originally Posted by zaGaffer View Post
    You know the more I post how-to articles, the more I realize how to difficult it is to put this kind of stuff into words.
    Yeah, but the more often you think about it and respond the better you become at communicating it. Hopefully.

    Quote Originally Posted by zaGaffer View Post
    When I duck dive a long board or any other high volume board, to me it almost seems like I am drawing a J or the silhouette of a fishing hook with the nose of my board. It’s almost a scooping motion after you knife the one side under. I hope that doesn't make the confusion worse.
    That makes sense. You dip one side of the board, thrusting it downward and forward-ish at an angle, and as you bring your chest to the board under the water, you pull upwards (like raising your hands above your shoulders) and rise up completing the J.

    I know what that feels like for shorter boards and have no issues there, but haven't felt it yet on the 9'2. I know nothing works better than time in the water, but I was sort of expecting you to tell me how that should feel for me on my longboard, and what I'm doing wrong. I feel a little let down.
    Last edited by viajerodevida; Jan 8, 2013 at 03:12 AM.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Charleston
    Posts
    1,990
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    8
    Quote Originally Posted by zaGaffer View Post
    My approach requires a little more finesse and a lot less muscle mass.

    Here’s me on my 9’6” Malibu with 120 cubic ft of volume. There’s an approaching wave.
    Attachment 6714

    I push one side of the board down first, doesn’t matter which side, so I slice into the water like a knife:
    Attachment 6715

    Now the front and one side of the board is under water. Here’s how this kind of looks:
    Attachment 6716

    Once I have the nose under like this, I push down with the other hand and my foot or feet at the same time, this levels the board out. You want the board to be deep, but level under the wave. This takes some effort depending on the size of your board, but a lot less effort than just trying to muscle it under. This is all one movement too, it should be seemless.

    Attachment 6717


    Continue pushing down once the wave has begun to go past you and gently rise out the other side.

    The nice thing about this, it works whether I have 0 momentum and am sitting in the lineup or paddling back out into it with plenty of speed; long board, short board, not a problem.
    That's some quality effort going into the explanation. I like your style.

    I do the same thing with my longboard but I find it takes a lot more upper body strength. Maybe I need to move further up the board. I only do this when the waves are above waste high too.

  5. #15
    Here's an eye opening video of a guy go-proing his longboard duckdive. I was pretty impressed. Not as easy as it looks but he is right, it's technique. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKfUQ_AsrO4

    You gotta love those Go-Pros. Awesome.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Charleston
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    Quote Originally Posted by zaGaffer View Post
    Thanks man, if it helps a couple of these kids nail their DDs on their potato chips, it'll be worth it. Same basic principle, only applied to a smaller board. Always funny to watch boards and people go flyin through the wash. Until they nail you with a fin.

    Hey, you should put some new pics of that wood board build thread and give us some updates. Inquiring minds want to know, how'd the glassing go?
    Gimme a little longer, I've been in NY since nov 16 helping with hurricane sandy recovery. GOING HOME NEXT MONDAY!!!! Really pumped to get back home with the family.

  7. #17
    A couple of other tips for ya

    1. On medium sized waves, say chest-head high, letting the front edge of the whitewater hit your lower back/butt area as you duck under can push you a little deeper before you have to level the board out and float to the surface. Once it gets much bigger than that getting blasted by the whitewater is more likely to rip the board from you hands.

    2. On long period swells try to stay under longer before surfacing by keeping the board flat for an extra second once you are at your max depth. This lets more of the whitewater flow over you before surfacing. On short period swells most of the energy is contained in a narrower band of whitewater so get to the top and start paddling quick to build up some momentum before the next wave gets to you.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Turtle Island
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    Nice job Gaffer, you let the poor guy down. Even though you took the time to draw diagrams and explain thoroughly, you still let him down. Real nice.

  9. #19
    I body board so duck diving is a little different for me than for stand up surfers. It's still extremely important on a big day to be able to paddle as hard as you can into that breaking wave and then get down under it as far as you can. Of course some times when it's really shallow and over head you can dive to the bottom and you aren't getting under the wave. Sometimes in that situation I will ditch my board, grab the leash as close to the board as I can and swim down on the sand upside down and paddle with my fins into the breaking wave while simultaneously snatching my leash to try and keep my board from getting sucked into the wave. You can break leashes this way but you will get out into some heavy surf as well. I've seen some guys on longboards use this strategy down in the obx as well.


    I saw something I had never seen before during that nice swell we got at the end of December. I guess everyone from VA went north or south because the oceanfront was pretty vacant for such a gnarly day. Anyways I saw these three guys paddle out. They weren't bad at all, I wouldn't say they were exceptional but they made it out and were dropping in on waves. One of the guys was paddling out into the waves, jumping up onto his feet right before the wave broke and pushing the board down with his feet and then diving into the face of the wave. It seemed to be working out for him but it was the first time I've ever seen it.

    Anyone do that or seen anyone else doing it?

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Typical swellinfo d*ckhead
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    1,241
    Ditching is dangerous to you and others, but then again its a morey boogie. Still, you should duck dive it with your knees. As to the standing on the board, then diving into the face of the wave, I really can't imagine a more dangerous modus operandi. Buoyancy is a powerful force. A surfboard jumping out of the water hitting you in the undercarriage would prevent procreation or a host of other terrible things - like losing an eyeball.