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  1. #321
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Wilmington
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    Not to mention you would think he would choose better wood than Paulownia considering how expensive his boards are.

    Hell, Clemsonsurf used Sapele on the FIRST wooden board he has attempted--that gorgeous Mini Simmons... which I'm sure Roy thinks is very inefficient because it didn't take 12 trees to make and it's as short as one of the fin boxes on Roy's boards.

  2. #322
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    garbage state
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roy Stuart View Post
    FYI I do not smoke crack, nor do I drink alcohol or use drugs of any kind, prescription or otherwise.

    Your comment is defamatory.
    You're trying to sell the world a 500k toboggan. Are you sure?

  3. #323
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Charleston
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erock View Post
    Not to mention you would think he would choose better wood than Paulownia considering how expensive his boards are.

    Hell, Clemsonsurf used Sapele on the FIRST wooden board he has attempted--that gorgeous Mini Simmons... which I'm sure Roy thinks is very inefficient because it didn't take 12 trees to make and it's as short as one of the fin boxes on Roy's boards.
    I'm blushing....

  4. #324
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Stayin' Classy in San Diego
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    1,925
    Quote Originally Posted by Erock View Post
    Not to mention you would think he would choose better wood than Paulownia considering how expensive his boards are.

    Hell, Clemsonsurf used Sapele on the FIRST wooden board he has attempted--that gorgeous Mini Simmons... which I'm sure Roy thinks is very inefficient because it didn't take 12 trees to make and it's as short as one of the fin boxes on Roy's boards.
    I don't know a darn thing about paulownia, but I was under the impression that it's a pretty good wood to use for things that are going to be exposed to sea water. I thought it was kind of like teak in that respect, don't they both resist absorbing water? Tom Wegener is using it for alaias, paipos and hand planes out here; I see him and a lot of other people riding paulownia thing-a-ma-bobbers.

    I know that sapele is a very soft wood, it's the soundboard of my guitar and an errant pick will leave a mark.

    I'm actually interested in the design aspects of surfboards in general. Erock, I've gathered you know a thing or two about wood (huh huh, sorry).

    Why is sapele a superior wood to use for ocean going craft in comparison to paulownia?

    By the way, there's a great thread on Sway's about how FireWire is going to make a recycled EPS core board clad in a Paulownia skin. First FireWire I've ever seen that I looked at and said, "I wouldn't mind trying one of those out." I've had my eye on a Sunova or a Hess though.

    Here's the link: http://www.swaylocks.com/forums/fire...wnia-to-masses

    Quote Originally Posted by SouthjettyBill View Post
    No one from Arkansas cares about surfing.
    Totally wrong about the construction of my guitar. Wild cherry laminate back and sides, red cedar sound board.
    Last edited by zaGaffer; Feb 13, 2013 at 03:01 AM. Reason: Learn sumthin nude everyday

  5. #325
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
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    2,452
    Paulownia is used in surfcraft primarily because it is super low density, but still reasonably hard (durable). It's both lighter and harder than cedar... even white cedar. It also won't crack or warp when kiln dried, which is nice, because then you can get the stuff really, really dry, really quickly.

  6. #326
    Paulownia is reported to have the highest strength to weight ratio of any wood in the world. It is also relatively stable.

    Air drying of paulownia is preferable, we have tried kiln drying but the results are not as good as via a few years of air drying.

    LBCrew you asked about tail volume earlier. It's important to distinguish between the effects of volume and of area.Lift produced via planing area increases as speed increases, whereas displacement lift from immersed volume does not .

    Using displacement based lift allows the response from the tail to remain relatively constant over a wide range of speeds. Conversely wide planing tails require a lot more force to move rail to rail as speed increases ( since lift increases by the square with higher speed).

    On the Makaha 12-9 which is seen on this thread, planing lift is reintroduced via a half pipe tunnel fin. Due to the shape of this fin the planing lift does not inhibit rail to rail roll, so we have the best of all worlds, a narrow tail for control with efficient low drag planing lift from the tunnel.

    Here's some food for thought,the Makaha 12-9 is in the middle:

    Oloquiver4.jpg
    Last edited by Roy Stuart; Feb 12, 2013 at 05:27 PM.

  7. #327
    Quote Originally Posted by Erock View Post

    We must be so dense.

    True, but with sufficient effort improvements can be hoped for.

  8. #328
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Boston
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    Paulownia and Cedar are the two best woods for building wooden surfboards due to their weight and water resistance. Granted if you are glassing a wooden board a proper glass job should protect the wood from ever touching water. If you are not concerned with weight than use any wood you prefer.

    Sapele is a "relatively" soft wood considering it is a hardwood but I would not consider it soft. I build a lot of furniture using sapele and its does not ding easily. I would consider cedar or pine a soft wood considering you can dig your nail into the wood or dent it with a slight bump. The pick up on your guitar could be African Mahogany which is very soft. Due to availability I used African Mahogany instead of Sapele for a kitchen counter since the look is very similar. I dropped a mug on it a couple months ago and it left a slight dent.
    (Not that any of this has relevance to this thread)

  9. #329
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
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    2,452
    Yea... I noticed that at very low speed the tail is completely submerged into the wave, particularly as the pocket catches up to you. You can see the board respond by changing planing angle (and maybe flexing through that low pressure area?), as the lever tips around the fulcrum. Increasing both volume and planing area in the tail (buoyancy and the tail's ability to "catch" wave energy) will effect how the board responds in those situations. You're not getting much lift from your fin at those low speeds, so your thick tail is a good way to address that.

  10. #330
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Old Jersey
    Posts
    409
    Quote Originally Posted by Roy Stuart View Post
    I fixed your grammar, don't worry there's no charge the first time.

    Please remind me what your questions were.

    .
    There is no possible way for you to charge me. I am not going to even post the questions because I have lost all interest. Don't fix my grammar. You have no interest in making or selling surfboards with your current prices. You seem interested in only bringing attention to yourself. You seem pathetic. Enjoy your Swellinfo.com thread, adios.