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  1. #1

    Angry custom surfboard thoughts?

    im having my local shaper make me a channel islands semi pro; basically exact same board at a fraction of the price, however there is a question i have- he wants to glass it 6oz, but i am not sure if that will make it less maneuverable or impossible to do airs on becuaase it will make it heavier. I would have it glassed 4oz for weight, ideally. What do you think? The board im getting is a 6 ft 1 inch, squash tail, wide point three inches behind center, slightly wider nose for mushy days, dims are 61 x 18 5/8 x 2 1/4. There is a deep single concave into a vee in the back, plenty of rocker. Any thoughts on the board? Im trying to get it as a winter/fall/spring board, waist to overhead high. Im 6 feet tall and weigh 170, which is why i wanted to get a inch bigger than me (winter wetsuit weight). OVerall i want a loose, skatey board than i can do hard turns on and try to land some airs.
    Any thoughts?

  2. #2
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    heavier glassing will make it a bit stronger & help the board last longer. IMO, there is no reason for the average surfer to have an "ultralight" board...those boards are essentially disposable surfboards. if a difference in 2oz. of glass is going to prevent you from doing airs, you probably shouldn't be trying airs. heavier boards also handle better in chop & high wind conditions. i'm not sure where the idea that you HAVE to have a super light board in order to surf progressively came from, but it's not a practical reality for the average surfer. if you look at an "ultralight" glassed board from the 80's & the glassing lam (if it has one) will likely show that it's got a 6/4x4 schedule, rather than today's 4/4x4 schedule. personally, at 6ft & 190, i can't ride boards glassed that way as i am very heavy on my feet, especially through turns, & i crush the decks in a matter of sessions. all my boards are 6/4x4 glassed.

    that said, hopefully the shaper is willing to glass it however you want it, given that you're the one ordering the board & paying for it.

  3. #3
    thats a good point, there are a lot of days where lighter boards can get crippled with the wind and chop. any i wasnt sure if heavier glass would cost me a lot in terms of boards aerial abililty. BEing that i can barely get air let along land it, im sure it wont make any difference except provide me with more drive down the line of smaller days due to it being a little heavier

  4. #4
    and by 6/4x4, thats 6oz on top and 4 on the bottom?

  5. #5
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    What's the core? If it's EPS, 6oz all around is fine. If it's PU, there's different densities, too. Gotta look at the whole picture... One thing I can say about that board, is the better the waves are, the better it will work. Waist high is stretching it.

    different glassers do it differently... Putting the 6oz under the 4 on the deck will save some weight. Putting the 6oz on top will give slightly better ding resistance. Four oz goes on the hull.
    Last edited by LBCrew; Feb 22, 2013 at 11:54 AM.

  6. #6
    If you stick with the 4 oz, you might want to reinforce your tail (and other weaker spots) after the glassing is complete. I know a few dudes that go straight to a shaper, for tail reinforcement, right after buying any performance short board. I've never done this, but I'm sure it works and it might be worth discussing with your shaper.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by hcsurf15 View Post
    and by 6/4x4, thats 6oz on top and 4 on the bottom?
    most boards have 2 layers of glass on the deck, either double 4oz (your standard "ultralight"), or a layer of 6oz & a layer of 4oz. a single layer of 4oz glass on the bottom is pretty standard. to save a bit of weight, you can do a full layer of 4oz on the deck & a 3/4 length patch of 6oz.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by LBCrew View Post
    What's the core? If it's EPS, 6oz all around is fine. If it's PU, there's different densities, too. Gotta look at the whole picture... One thing I can say about that board, is the better the waves are, the better it will work. Waist high is stretching it.

    different glassers do it differently... Putting the 6oz under the 4 on the deck will save some weight. Putting the 6oz on top will give slightly better ding resistance. Four oz goes on the hull.
    OK- so basically if i go with a lighter foam, go will more glass? I dont want the board to be too heavy but its the shape that makes its maneuverability, not the weight. I dont think the extra 2 oz of glass will make airs that much harder in good waves, and id rather not have a board for a year and then ditch it at a garage sale cause its so dinged up

  9. #9
    stop worrying so much about the dimensions and weight of your board. I have friends who can out-surf half the entire lineup on any given day on a 20 year old POS. Your asking questions only the top level pro's should really be concerned with.

    Get a board that will float you and is good for your local conditions. Nice job on going to a local shaper. Experiment with different fins. I find they matter more than the board itself. work on your style, always try to improve, and make sure its always fun. Everything else comes naturally.

  10. #10
    If you're doing airs...a standard board probably will only last 1yr. or less (and I think that is generous) with a standard glass job from my experience. I would go 6+4/4--the weight difference is totally negligible. Given all the other variables while surfing I am not sure you'd even notice the difference when up and riding. You'll likely put a pad on the board, your leash dragging, fins (depending materials), etc. that will weigh more than the additional weight that you would have from a heavier glass job. Also, I'm a EPS fan and been loving my parabolic boards...i find it incredibly easy to flip around an EPS board--poly boards feel dead to me at this point so I would really consider getting that type of foam--but to each their own. As well, the weight savings between EPS/PU is obvious...

    You looking for a board to flick around, learning airs, with a bit of durability--I'd go with an EPS/Epoxy. My $.02--you'll pay more for it, but in the long run it would be worth it. Also, I would consider buying used if you are really just learning airs, etc. No need to destroy a new board landing in the flats...