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  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Kahuna Kai View Post
    I put traction on kook's windshields!! Locals only!!!
    perfect 10/10

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
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    I think boards 6'10'' and over and guns shouldn't need a pad. First of all, your back foot rarely ever gets back that far, unless you're putting on the brakes into a barrel. Second, it would just look funny. Yes, pro longboarders I could see w/ pads on their logs. Also, I think fish's shouldn't have pads because since most fish tails are pretty wide, they would look a bit funny too. And you wouldn't really be following the style (thats dane's job) of fish boards. Traditional single fins also shouldn't have pads in my opinion. Right when I got my CI Gravy, I wanted to go for a surf and not have to wait for the pad to fully dry and stick on. I couldn't really feel a difference, of course I wasn't doing airs that day.

  3. #13
    Join Date
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    You what!?!? Dude that's hilarius!!

  4. #14
    I have trac pads on most of my boards. I like them because it gives me a feel for where my back foot is on the tail of the board when I have to react fast. The only board I don't have one on is my barrel board. Its a nice rounded pin I strictly use for nasty screamers. Point aand shoot, no trac pad needed.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    in the grace of the most holy FSM
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    3,559
    i feel as if it's just another "thing" the surf industry has cooked up to separate us from our $$. i mean, looking back, pads weren't widely used until the 90's. tom curren won 3 titles w/out pads, tom carroll won 2, etc...so many good surfers don't use them, but it seems like surfers now have come to think that having a pad on a hpsb is a necessity & i'm curious as to why that is. as other have commented, they don't really add any structural integrity to the board, & i definitely push my boards hard & i'm a big guy; it's pretty easy for me to make fins release.
    an interesting tidbit that i learned back in 2010, when i was lucky enough to spend a week on a boat in the maldives: gary dunn, the rip curl international team manager, told me that many of the pros only use pads b/c they are under contract to use company x's accessories & have actually found that, on narrow tailed boards especially, pads can create drag. anyone remember kelly going padless on a few boards over the past few years?

    the responses here have been pretty interesting (& a few hysterical)

  6. #16
    Had one on my first board, a hayward thruster from 1986. I was foolish enough to earn on a short board. I have never used one since. When I was learning I was a knee dragging fool and that thing ate my foot up. Next board I just left it off and never looked back. I can see the need for the young floppy aerial guys... But not for us slater aged east coast slop riders.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    bethany & wrightsville
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    I don't use it on my fish, simply because I move my feet a lot when I ride it. Its a 5'9 and I can ride 5 on da nose!

  8. #18
    i do beleive they help protect the board from your feet digging into the deck a bit,that said i dont use on all boards. also thinking of young pros ,mason ho rips very hard and doesnt need one

  9. #19
    I've tried them, but I don't really like them. I must admit, though, that I do not do air - I am a pretty old fashioned wave rider on both long and short board. All my boards are just waxed - just my personal preference.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
    Posts
    3,977
    Have you ever had your back foot blown off the board by whitewater trying to make it around a section? Before traction pads, that used to happen to me occasionally, and that was, at the time, the main reason why I started using them. Over the years, I feel the most important part about the pad are the block and the arch. In fact, I've only put those two parts on many of my boards. I feel like when you're pushing the tail around and using a lot of lateral force, the arch and block keep your back foot from slipping, and give you a little something more to push against. Plus, it helps keep your foot planted when the lip explodes right next to it.