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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Promontorium Tremendum
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    1,082
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    Beach Nourishment project in CB

    what could possibly go wrong?

    http://www.islandgazette.net/news-se...leasure-island

    anybody who is knowledgeable about these projects and familiar with CB care to comment on the possible impact on surf here?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
    Posts
    2,584
    I can only advise you to get involved. Surfers are stakeholders, and locals are taxpayers. The effects of beach replenishment on surfing vary from location to location. Sometimes it improves breaks... sometimes it destroys breaks. But one thing is sure... once it begins, it's very difficult to stop.

  3. #3
    Rockaway beach is getting ready to start also. the city is taking bids... typically I'd be against pumping more sand on the beach but the reality, from having a home here, it has to be done. Sandy certainly rearranged the sandbars here and I think they are better. they are definitely out a lot further then before... which I think will help them be less affected from the dredging process. but no matter what.... I don't wan to have a swimming pool in my basement again....

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    bethany & wrightsville
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    498
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    32
    For some reason the link won't work, even on a Google search, but I have done numerous research papers on this topic and am doing my senior thesis on it as well. Re-nourishment sucks, it's a "quick-fix" and certainly costs too much money for what it does provide. Honestly, if the Army Core really cared, an effective, permanent solution would have already been found.

    My idea is bringing ASR limited over here from NZ and get them to solve our problems. An artificial reef provides wave energy dissipation, a new habitat that could increase biodiversity, and it is permanent! Not to mention, it bring a reef break to our coasts. Swimmers could stay close to shore and surfers out way past the breakers, therefore no surf zones!

    Say no to this BS. Obviously if we pump sand once at a hefty price tag of $5-20 million and then have to do it a few years later....something is wrong. Fight against re-nourishment and ask for a new solution.

    MFitz: I understand where you are coming from with Sandy and all and sand pumping seems to be just the first step for you guys but down here it is totally different. We just want more beach for tourist dollars.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Carolina Beach
    Posts
    689
    I got a place at the North End of CB. Got the place two years ago and have been surfing for two years pretty much exclusively between Periwinkle and the pier. I talked to a couple local surfers about the replenishment and it does change the break for a while. One guy said the sand is almost half way out the pier at low tide after the re-nourishment. They do it every three years. It changes the break obviously, but I don't know how much. I've seen it change a lot in the two years I've surfed there. I actually want some sand on the beach. At high tide there is none and all the stair accesses are snapped off. They won't repair them until the sand is back.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Promontorium Tremendum
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    i think the site went down after i posted the link...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    1,033
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    2
    Quote Originally Posted by superbust View Post
    For some reason the link won't work, even on a Google search, but I have done numerous research papers on this topic and am doing my senior thesis on it as well. Re-nourishment sucks, it's a "quick-fix" and certainly costs too much money for what it does provide. Honestly, if the Army Core really cared, an effective, permanent solution would have already been found.

    My idea is bringing ASR limited over here from NZ and get them to solve our problems. An artificial reef provides wave energy dissipation, a new habitat that could increase biodiversity, and it is permanent! Not to mention, it bring a reef break to our coasts. Swimmers could stay close to shore and surfers out way past the breakers, therefore no surf zones!

    Say no to this BS. Obviously if we pump sand once at a hefty price tag of $5-20 million and then have to do it a few years later....something is wrong. Fight against re-nourishment and ask for a new solution.

    MFitz: I understand where you are coming from with Sandy and all and sand pumping seems to be just the first step for you guys but down here it is totally different. We just want more beach for tourist dollars.

    besides not doing it in the first place, this seriously the best answer ive heard on this website or anywhere else. Great point about the artificial reefs vs. replenishment. saves a **** ton of time and effort in the long run.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Carolina Beach
    Posts
    689
    Superbust does have a point. a permanent solution of an artificial reef would be great. Part of the problem with the north end of the island is the canal. It has to be dredged every three years so the boats can get in and out. I was assuming they would use that sand but I'm no engineer. Probably the sand they dredge out of the canal is the sand that was used for replenishing three years ago. Tourists like sand. Hell I like sand too.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Promontorium Tremendum
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    anyone else notice a little less punch to CB surf (Tiki Bar area in particular) in the last year or so? a little more prone to mushiness, even at lower tides? maybe the additional sand will help*

    *unless it's just me, which it often is...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    milton delaware
    Posts
    1,553
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    270
    Nothing is permanent. Especially on eroding barrier islands.

    Nothing against reefs, but if we've built our houses and roads right on the edge of eroding beaches, its going to take a lot more than putting a few hundred feet of rocks or geotextile bags in the ocean.