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  1. #1

    Tim Notle- Used board advice

    Hey guys and gals I'm brand new to this forum and almost brand new to surfing as well. I've surfed Puerto Rico a couple times during the winter in Rincon on longboards but thats about it, and never when the swells got huge. I'm going to be going up to UNCW this fall and am looking to get a surfboard, a friend of my brother said he would sell me this board, and I am just kind of confused and am looking for some information on it, he says it is 5'6\" but i dont know the other dimensions. What confused me was that it looked like a fish board but it has no swallowtail, so is it a fish or a shortboard? or some kind of hybrid? apparently its pretty thick and wide and buoyant I know its probably gonna be a big learning curve going from a longboard to this and I might get frustrated but I dont really have the budget to get a fun board first and then drop down to something smaller. I'm pretty athletic, a pretty decent wake boarder, and wake surfer haha even though i know its a lot different but we'll see how it goes. So any info would be much appreciated im 5'10 and 165 pounds, would it be a good size for me? Is it a good board for NC waves, and finally, what would be a good price for the board? I'm sorry if i'm missing any information that would help answer my question because again i'm new but thanks for all the help!!surfboard.jpgsurfboard2.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Stayin' Classy in San Diego
    Posts
    1,478
    How thick and wide is it? That's the kicker. It's pretty short, but it does look like it's got some float and you ain't in Butterbean's weightclass. It's not a fish, but you gotta good eye. I'm sure u know, a fish has a wide cut out in the tail like it does so that it grips the face of the wave better and goes faster down the line. Ideal for lined up point breaks, the designs gotta be 50 years old now. It's wide in the nose to make if easier to paddle into and then catch the wave. That board's got a wide thick nose for the same reason. It's got a modern wide tail and more rocker to make it skatier and more maneuverable than a traditional fish. Much better for contemporary surfin and everyday waves. Only thing is, it's pretty short for your first shortboard; but you know that. What's he asking for it?

  3. #3
    yeah he wants 225 for it, is that a good price? Once i find out the dimensions of the thickness and width i'll post that.

  4. #4
    and too short you think? He said that the extra width and length would make it easier on me than a regular short board but what do you think?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
    Posts
    2,302
    Looks like a fun board, for sure. Definitely easier to ride than a chippy shortboard, but 5'6 is pretty short... not for a novice, I'd say.

  6. #6
    Okay guys so it's 19 3/4 And 2 3/8 thick. Good? bad? Too short for novice or too short just for my weight? He said it's modeld after the Al Merrick pod.

  7. #7
    Nolte builds for bigger guys. so floatation won't be an issue. I thought a fish was a twin fin swallowtail. I got one that Doyle built. 7'2", wide and thick. A catch all in all size waves. Doyle taught Nolte.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    bethany & wrightsville
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    440
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    Thats a great board for Wilmington waves and like everyone else has said it seems like it will float you just fine. I'd say it will take some getting used too but once you feel comfortable you'll love it for those clean waist-chest days around here. The price seems fair too as long as it is water-tight. I'd still try to talk him down though, always gotta bargain.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Stayin' Classy in San Diego
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    1,478
    Quote Originally Posted by bdavis View Post
    yeah he wants 225 for it, is that a good price? Once i find out the dimensions of the thickness and width i'll post that.
    $225 is a fair price for a used surfboard, depending on its condition and who shaped and glassed it. Here's some things that I look at when buying a used board.

    1)Serious stress fractures and big honkin pressure dings on the bottom. Means it's been ridden real hard. Walk on by. When they run perpendicular to the stringer, that board's days are numbered. I run my hand over the whole bottom of the board and make sure that it's smooth and there's nothing I missed.
    2) Serious deck pounds. I'm not talking a couple of heelies here and there, that's no big deal; I'm talking about when there are two deep concaves on either side of the stringer, which is sticking out like the keel on a boat. Don't buy a board without stripping the wax either. You want a real good idea of what's under there.
    3)Fins and fin boxes. Just make sure there aren't any cracks in the glass or that they aren't sticking out at a funky angle when compared to the rest. Test the screws, make sure they work (derp). Bring a fin to test em with. Make sure any fin boxes are smooth with the glass. Fins get jacked up real easy.
    4)Dings and things. Make sure there aren't any open wounds, same goes for chicks with cold sores. Look for discolorations on the board. Any spot that's brown or yellowing is or has taken on water. I try not buy dinged boards, but if the repair looks really solid and it's a board I've been jonesin for, I'll snap it up. They're a good negotiating point as they lower a board's value.
    5)Delams. I press on the whole board and make sure there are no soft or mushy spots where the glass has pulled away from the foam. These spots are called delaminations and they suck.
    6)Haggle, worst they can say is no.

    I think the width and thickness on that board are perfect for you. The length is four inches too short for a beginner surfing mush waves. But, buy it if you like. It's easy to buy and sell a quality board in a surfing town. Good luck man

  10. #10
    If you get that board, I'd suggest filing the edge of those 4 little knives on the bottom