LOGIN | REGISTER

Page 9 of 10 FirstFirst ... 78910 LastLast
Results 81 to 90 of 91
  1. #81
    As I said no need for jettys in this area the damage is more severe further up the cliff walk. They want to make a massive iron casting around the sea wall which is ridiculous. Easy to patch it up and not deal with jettys.

  2. #82
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    milton delaware
    Posts
    1,408
    Images
    262
    Quote Originally Posted by littlerhody View Post
    As I said no need for jettys in this area the damage is more severe further up the cliff walk. They want to make a massive iron casting around the sea wall which is ridiculous. Easy to patch it up and not deal with jettys.
    Are the proposed jetties permanent? Permanent jetties make no sense for a rock bottomed shoreline like that area...the purpose of jetties is to hold migrating sand in place and control erosion. I've never heard of groins or jetties being placed to solve a cliff erosion problem.

    The construction drawings on the RI DOT website have a label that i took to mean the jetties are just temporary structures to allow the barges to offload the armor rock to be placed at the cliff bottom.

    On NESURF.com:


    "Dave McLaughlin, founder of Clean Ocean Access had this to say about the proposals and timeline of the project: “The entire work effort is split into 27 zones, [and] the estimated duration of the project is six months. When I reviewed these plans on March 20th, I questioned the rectangles offshore [and] was told they were the ‘access points’ for the barge to offload the material on the shoreline — there was no talk of jetties. If the concept of a jetty was known, that issue would have surfaced 11 days ago. On the plans I saw, it called for five to ten feet of armor stone, but the CRMC permit request disclosed the information more explicitly by indicating the rock will extend to 2.43 feet below mean high tide water mark. If you’ve ever walked out at Ruggles at low tide (which is about -0.5 on average), to get to -2.43 feet is about 10 feet past the natural rock.”

  3. #83
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Aquidneck Island
    Posts
    45
    IMG_0224.jpgIMG_0225.jpg


    i reuploaded the pics that werent working.

  4. #84
    even if the jetties are not permanent there is no way they will get all the rocks out when they go to remove them. it willl still change the bottom contour and ruin the break. on another note anyone get out at ruggles today. I didnt make it down but looked like it might have been decentt today.

  5. #85
    Guys, quit relying on the lamestream media. You thought RIDOT was the reason why Ruggles is done? Let me introduce you to the real culprit---a piece of legislation that "slipped" through the cracks of the dilligent RI media: Tanner's Law.

    Well, it all started in early August 2012 on an foggy morning in Narragansett. Tanner Broeman was having trouble sleeping in the Point Judith vacation home that his family had rented for a week. The air was salty and opressively humid. The foghorn bellowed its long and dull warning. Tanner decided to take a walk down to the lighthouse and saw something that changed his life, and the lives of Rhode Island surfers, forever. There were waves. A small front had pushed through the previous night and Tanner treated himself to a morning of wave-watching. Old surfers, young surfers, shortboarders and Stand Up Paddlebourders descended on the point, wave starved and ready to get radical. Growing up in Old Saybrook, Tanner had never seen anything like what he witnessed on that fateful August morning. He returned to the rented house and greeted his puzzled father with the words, "Dad, I think I want to be a surfer."

    So after breakfast they left the house and went down to the local surf shop. Tanner scored a brand new ...Lo5t plank, Mirage (like wearing nothing) boardies, some wax, and headed down to the point. Said Tanner's father Grill Vogel-Broeman, who adopted his wife's surname, "I was a little scared when he first mentioned surfing. I remembered the types of people who engaged in that activity that I'd seen from vacationing in Rhode Island: Their cars littered with stickers, their language nearly unintelligible, their skin tanned and leathery. I was scared."

    Tanner willed his way into the lineup. Failure was not an option. After breaking through the weak windswell, he made it and sat on his board admiring the lighthouse and his own determination. What followed changed surfing as we know it in the Ocean State: somebody noticed Tanner struggling to assert himself in the lineup and when a waist-high runner came through, the seasoned surfer signalled for Tanner to take the wave. In a stunning moment of courage and sticktuitiveness, Tanner paddled hard and made it to his feet. But he couldn't turn. Heading straight for a boil, Tanner lost his cool and jumped, landing straight on top of a barnacled boulder. Something felt wrong---he looked down and noticed that his new boardies had ripped from the knee to the thigh. He had also broken two fins. Disoriented and shocked, Tanner went home and hasn't been seen in Narragansett since that day.

    "I just couldn't believe it, I was really stunned," said Priscilla Broeman. "How could anyone design a surfbourding area that incorporated rocks? It just seems so counterintuitive," she later opined. But Priscilla didn't stop there. She decided to stand up for her son and for the vacationers who enjoy Rhode Island for almost three months every year. "I called the State House in Providence and said that this has to stop. Surfbourding should not be done anywhere near large stones or rocks. I became and remain a strong proponent of over-sand surfing and am prepared to take my findings to any legislature that will listen," said Ms. Broeman, a Brown graduate who double majored in Progression and Green Activities who know owns an antique shop. "People don't understand how dangerous that non-over-sand surfing can be. What if Tanner's body was injured? What if his board was punctured? My imagination has been running wild ever since that August Day," continued Ms. Broeman who has been seeing a specialist for PTNOSSD(post traumatic non-over sand surfing disorder).

    On March 31, Tanner's Law became a reality. After calling an emergency session, the legislature unanimously approved the bill which calls for jetty constuction at all rock-bottom surfbourding areas in Rhode Island. The bill approves a trial run of jetties to be built at Ruggles, Point Judith, and Matunuck and will extend to all secret and worthwile surfing areas at a later date. "I'm just glad because people really don't know what's best for them sometimes," said Ms. Broeman. "I think this initiative will bring some closure into our lives," added Mr. Vogel-Broeman.

    As for Tanner, he's given up surfing, but every summer when he hears the foghorn he remembers his brush with danger. Said Tanner, "I can't forget about it but I can forgive. I just want everything to be back to normal."

  6. #86
    I'm just hoping they don't plan on ruining 2nd beach at some point in the future by "replenishing" it. One of the VERY few sand bars that doesn't usually close out and has a really good wave shape. Ruggles can get good, but it needs a long period swell and is a big wave spot. 2nd is consistently good and relied on for most of the surfing in the area as can be seen by the huge crowds it gets. I'm just thankful at least their not ruining 2nd then we'd really be screwed.

    That being said, I really hope people can stop this crap from happening.
    Last edited by shark-hunter; Apr 8, 2013 at 12:52 AM.

  7. #87
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Turtle Island
    Posts
    4,076
    Images
    6
    Is this Tanner's law thing for real? Did I read that post right?

  8. #88
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    León, Nicaragua, Nicaragua
    Posts
    2
    Images
    1
    We here at Thunderbomb surf camp are completely against the RI DOT plans for ruggles.
    for more information on how to help this cause please email us at info@thunderbombsurf.com

    Jonathan.
    www.thunderbombsurf.com

  9. #89
    Quote Originally Posted by seldom seen View Post
    Is this Tanner's law thing for real? Did I read that post right?
    uninspired imitation of SJB or something along those lines.

  10. #90
    very descriptive maybe you should write for surfers journal but serioussly wtf are you talking about!
    City council meeting wednesday 630pm for anyone local
    Quote Originally Posted by bogeetimeRI View Post
    Guys, quit relying on the lamestream media. You thought RIDOT was the reason why Ruggles is done? Let me introduce you to the real culprit---a piece of legislation that "slipped" through the cracks of the dilligent RI media: Tanner's Law.

    Well, it all started in early August 2012 on an foggy morning in Narragansett. Tanner Broeman was having trouble sleeping in the Point Judith vacation home that his family had rented for a week. The air was salty and opressively humid. The foghorn bellowed its long and dull warning. Tanner decided to take a walk down to the lighthouse and saw something that changed his life, and the lives of Rhode Island surfers, forever. There were waves. A small front had pushed through the previous night and Tanner treated himself to a morning of wave-watching. Old surfers, young surfers, shortboarders and Stand Up Paddlebourders descended on the point, wave starved and ready to get radical. Growing up in Old Saybrook, Tanner had never seen anything like what he witnessed on that fateful August morning. He returned to the rented house and greeted his puzzled father with the words, "Dad, I think I want to be a surfer."

    So after breakfast they left the house and went down to the local surf shop. Tanner scored a brand new ...Lo5t plank, Mirage (like wearing nothing) boardies, some wax, and headed down to the point. Said Tanner's father Grill Vogel-Broeman, who adopted his wife's surname, "I was a little scared when he first mentioned surfing. I remembered the types of people who engaged in that activity that I'd seen from vacationing in Rhode Island: Their cars littered with stickers, their language nearly unintelligible, their skin tanned and leathery. I was scared."

    Tanner willed his way into the lineup. Failure was not an option. After breaking through the weak windswell, he made it and sat on his board admiring the lighthouse and his own determination. What followed changed surfing as we know it in the Ocean State: somebody noticed Tanner struggling to assert himself in the lineup and when a waist-high runner came through, the seasoned surfer signalled for Tanner to take the wave. In a stunning moment of courage and sticktuitiveness, Tanner paddled hard and made it to his feet. But he couldn't turn. Heading straight for a boil, Tanner lost his cool and jumped, landing straight on top of a barnacled boulder. Something felt wrong---he looked down and noticed that his new boardies had ripped from the knee to the thigh. He had also broken two fins. Disoriented and shocked, Tanner went home and hasn't been seen in Narragansett since that day.

    "I just couldn't believe it, I was really stunned," said Priscilla Broeman. "How could anyone design a surfbourding area that incorporated rocks? It just seems so counterintuitive," she later opined. But Priscilla didn't stop there. She decided to stand up for her son and for the vacationers who enjoy Rhode Island for almost three months every year. "I called the State House in Providence and said that this has to stop. Surfbourding should not be done anywhere near large stones or rocks. I became and remain a strong proponent of over-sand surfing and am prepared to take my findings to any legislature that will listen," said Ms. Broeman, a Brown graduate who double majored in Progression and Green Activities who know owns an antique shop. "People don't understand how dangerous that non-over-sand surfing can be. What if Tanner's body was injured? What if his board was punctured? My imagination has been running wild ever since that August Day," continued Ms. Broeman who has been seeing a specialist for PTNOSSD(post traumatic non-over sand surfing disorder).

    On March 31, Tanner's Law became a reality. After calling an emergency session, the legislature unanimously approved the bill which calls for jetty constuction at all rock-bottom surfbourding areas in Rhode Island. The bill approves a trial run of jetties to be built at Ruggles, Point Judith, and Matunuck and will extend to all secret and worthwile surfing areas at a later date. "I'm just glad because people really don't know what's best for them sometimes," said Ms. Broeman. "I think this initiative will bring some closure into our lives," added Mr. Vogel-Broeman.

    As for Tanner, he's given up surfing, but every summer when he hears the foghorn he remembers his brush with danger. Said Tanner, "I can't forget about it but I can forgive. I just want everything to be back to normal."