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Thread: Who's to blame?

  1. #31
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    So true, got a new DK board recently, not sure on where I want to plug it, so my last few sessions were leash-less...definitely refreshing, now I'm honestly in no rush to plug it.

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by zaGaffer View Post
    You've never had a leash fail? Surf more, they all fail eventually. Every time you are on a wave, you should surf as if you don't have a leash. That's why you don't eject or bail your board and you kick out at the end of the wave. It's how people should learn to surf. The problem is most people don't and they surf like idiots because they've never spent enough time swimming after their board.

    Every board is dangerous, regardless of it's of size or materials. And as far as leashes being dangerous, they can be, don't you know who Mark Foo is?
    The argument for no leash doesnt stand a chance for the argument to use a leash. While a leash will eventually fail, they've proven that the odds are in the favor of the leash working many many many many more times before it eventually fails. Surfer loses board with no leash on wave, it tumbles in and hits a swimmer in the face causing damage. Surfer is at fault. period end of story.

  3. #33
    breaking news: Leashes are now required on small wooden boats.

  4. #34
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    i dint think it is as cut and dry as you think fitz. On the surface it seems like the surfer is at fault but if this was a designated surfing area then IMO the woman was in the wrong.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by zaGaffer View Post
    You've never had a leash fail? Surf more, they all fail eventually. Every time you are on a wave, you should surf as if you don't have a leash. That's why you don't eject or bail your board and you kick out at the end of the wave. It's how people should learn to surf. The problem is most people don't and they surf like idiots because they've never spent enough time swimming after their board.

    Every board is dangerous, regardless of it's of size or materials. And as far as leashes being dangerous, they can be, don't you know who Mark Foo is?
    Leashes are like safety belts. The safety belt isn't going to save your life in all situations, and it is no replacement for safe driving, but if something does happen you are usually better off having it on. I try not to rely on my leash, but there are many times the board slips out of my hands or I slip off while riding. In those cases, it is nice to have a backup.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by aka pumpmaster View Post
    i dint think it is as cut and dry as you think fitz. On the surface it seems like the surfer is at fault but if this was a designated surfing area then IMO the woman was in the wrong.
    There are designated surf areas in Texas? I would find that a bit surprising.

  7. #37
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    Yo Aka pumpmaster empty you file so I can leave a short message. Don't need to fill site with other sport stuff.

  8. #38
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    There are no designated surf areas. I believe the incident took place on the seawall in Galveston. There are two main points where we have piers that most of us surf because it holds the current and has better developed sandbars. This creates a conflict because the attractions in those areas also encourage the tourons to set up shop for the day even though there is another 8 miles of beach with easy access.

    The part that is hard for me to grasp is that Galveston is very shallow with no significant drop off. In order to be in chest deep water you have to be past the third sand bar. Most surfing is done beyond the third sand bar which is a good 75-100 yards from the shoreline. So if you see surfers out there and you swim out to the desired break (which is what she said she did "Reynolds said she was enjoying a day at the beach and went into the water to watch her friend's child who wanted to swim. Long was surfing in the same area.") at what point do you have to assume responsibility for your own safety.

    My guess is she allowed a child to get into a dangerous situation and was paying more attention to him than her surroundings and caused and unsafe situation for everyone else....and then of course blamed someone else.

  9. #39
    I live in Surfside, 20 mins away from Galveston and unlike Galveston we only have about 6 blocks of surf and its crap every where else, but ppl always want to swim out to the line up like it's cool or something or let their kids play in the impackzone and they think that we should move away from the only break we have.
    I only see no swimming areas in Galveston.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by zaGaffer View Post
    ....Every time you are on a wave, you should surf as if you don't have a leash. That's why you don't eject or bail your board and you kick out at the end of the wave. It's how people should learn to surf. The problem is most people don't and they surf like idiots because they've never spent enough time swimming after their board.
    Man do i ever agree with you on this one. I am amazed at some of the lazy, inconsiderate, and downight risky ways people bail off their boards and in crowded lineups trusting that because they have a leash, the board is conveniently going to pop up right there next to them when they come up. How many times have you been paddling on the inside and have someone just give up on a section, completely bail and jump off their board about 30 feet outside of you, putting 100% blind trust in their (quickly stretching) leash preventing their board from clocking you in the head.

    People really do surf differently if they think their leash means that they arent going to be swimming all the way in.

    But yeah sure i use a leash when circumstances dictate its safer to do so.
    Last edited by mitchell; Apr 25, 2013 at 04:55 PM.