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  1. #51
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    Stayin' Classy in San Diego
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miahnaise View Post
    Now, I work at Pebble Beach and can see Ghost Trees from our restaurant. I've seen it break in the mid 20's twice since the end of November.
    That's the coolest thing I've heard in a while. Do you have any pics of it breaking big?

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    Science mother****er
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    2,796
    Quote Originally Posted by Indirect View Post
    To be completely honest I just started surfing. Been out in the water a total of a week and a half and I just say "Ok, it's choppy and head high. Sounds like a fun day to learn" if you're a strong swimmer and know the spot you're paddling then you can force yourself to learn quicker than an ankle high glassy day. Small isn't good for hands on unless that's your learning style (slow and steady) I prefer the "There it is, I've seen someone else do it. Let's see if I can" since it forces me to learn in harsher conditions as well as quickly to be able to save my own ***
    I don't agree with that. You will learn faster on waves you can catch. When it is head high with 25mph cross winds, on top of strong undertow/current, you will not be really catching any waves as a beginner. Unless you have natural talent, I think glassy waist-high swell tend to help you learn faster. I was out in the best and worst conditions as I was learning last year. I didn't really feel like I was getting it until I had a couple consistent days with glassy barreling waves. Once I was up and riding along the face a few times, it started to feel natural. Days like today, on the SE coast, are really crap for newbies. Mostly closeouts and mush, so you are not really learning how to ride a proper wave. Remember, just because you are standing up on a board, does not mean you are surfing.

  3. #53
    Sometimes when I post it's way to elegant for you readers and I'm accused of copy and pasting. So here's my advice. Don't listen to anyone in here telling you not to paddle out. Some of my best days have been paddling through 30-40 mph winds that make choppy waves but once you get out you are looking at DOH. That stands for double overhead. If you don't try you will never succeed. Just be careful.

  4. #54
    Check out the wave next to my name... Little bit of practice and you'll be there. Practice you're duck diving patterns. Be the board..

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    Stayin' Classy in San Diego
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    Quote Originally Posted by NJshredmachine View Post
    Sometimes when I post it's way to elegant for you readers and I'm accused of copy and pasting. So here's my advice. Don't listen to anyone in here telling you not to paddle out. Some of my best days have been paddling through 30-40 mph winds that make choppy waves but once you get out you are looking at DOH. That stands for double overhead. If you don't try you will never succeed. Just be careful.
    Elegant, what are you a füčking ballerina? You mean eloquent twinkle toes. It's like getting trolled by the kid who had to wear the helmet at recess.

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    Stayin' Classy in San Diego
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    Quote Originally Posted by NJshredmachine View Post
    Check out the wave next to my name... Little bit of practice and you'll be there. Practice you're duck diving patterns. Be the board..
    WTF is a duck diving pattern? Is that like when geese migrate?

    Also, you might want to stop trying to pass off the Pacific as the Atlantic, the waters look nothing alike.
    Last edited by zaGaffer; May 3, 2013 at 07:57 PM.

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Capo Beach
    Posts
    152
    What's the Over/Under on NJshredmachine's age? If it's over 15, I'm taking the under.

  8. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by brewengineer View Post
    I don't agree with that. You will learn faster on waves you can catch. When it is head high with 25mph cross winds, on top of strong undertow/current, you will not be really catching any waves as a beginner. Unless you have natural talent, I think glassy waist-high swell tend to help you learn faster. I was out in the best and worst conditions as I was learning last year. I didn't really feel like I was getting it until I had a couple consistent days with glassy barreling waves. Once I was up and riding along the face a few times, it started to feel natural. Days like today, on the SE coast, are really crap for newbies. Mostly closeouts and mush, so you are not really learning how to ride a proper wave. Remember, just because you are standing up on a board, does not mean you are surfing.
    I said it works for my learning style. I've already demonstrated before that after I have a while of horrible conditions, catching waves and actually surfing is A LOT easier when it's clean and decent height. Also I will agree that it is bad for people learning in the SE right now because we've been going on yet another head high + swell over the past few weeks so unless you want to practice duck diving, it's not that fun from a brand new surfer point of view.

  9. #59
    I started learning to surf a little less than a year ago as I didn't have the privilege of growing up near the ocean. A few weeks after I started I paddled out on a day that was above my ability level (head high maybe overhead with fast closeouts). I had just about made it outside when a wave broke on top of me and held me down for what felt like 30 seconds (it was probably less than 10 seconds but I didn't have very good lung capacity at the time.) The ocean has a funny way of putting you in your place. I was pretty shook up but I learned a ton of lessons that day: knowing what conditions I could and couldn't handle, respecting the ocean, and knowing I could handle taking a wave on the head.

    Try to find something positive every time you go out, even if its as simple as feeling more comfortable on your board. I was out a few days ago and wasn't catching anything because of a couple converging swells and a strong current but there were dolphins jumping about 10 yards away from me which made the session amazing.

  10. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by mike228 View Post
    I started learning to surf a little less than a year ago as I didn't have the privilege of growing up near the ocean. A few weeks after I started I paddled out on a day that was above my ability level (head high maybe overhead with fast closeouts). I had just about made it outside when a wave broke on top of me and held me down for what felt like 30 seconds (it was probably less than 10 seconds but I didn't have very good lung capacity at the time.) The ocean has a funny way of putting you in your place. I was pretty shook up but I learned a ton of lessons that day: knowing what conditions I could and couldn't handle, respecting the ocean, and knowing I could handle taking a wave on the head.

    Try to find something positive every time you go out, even if its as simple as feeling more comfortable on your board. I was out a few days ago and wasn't catching anything because of a couple converging swells and a strong current but there were dolphins jumping about 10 yards away from me which made the session amazing.
    You'll remember that hold down, too...had exactly the same thing happen to me in my first year of surfing. Had my head and shoulder pinned to the bottom for what seemed like an eternity. Definitely humbling, but prepares you for future sessions, i think it gives you more courage and reinforces the importance of placement in the lineup...

    To The OP:

    and ShREDMacHiNe could give you ideas on duck diving patterns...lol

    Surfing is not an easy thing you just pick up, maybe if you throw up 400, down 4Loco and bang all Hindu Honeys, but for the vast majority of people it requires hours upon hours of water time. Every time you go out the conditions can and probably will be different, so it takes a lot patience.

    Work on duck diving, not NJSM's patterns...getting out there is numero uno, then comes figuring out where you need to be to catch a wave, then how to know when to start paddling for the wave, foot placement on board....way too many variables....shoot for catching a wave and riding down the line, first and the rest will follow. The feeling you get when you get it good....it's irreplaceable.
    Last edited by Koki Barrels; May 3, 2013 at 10:48 PM.