LOGIN | REGISTER

Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 51
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Western Puerto Rico
    Posts
    93
    Images
    6

    Duckdive dilemma

    Just want to relate something that happened recently and see if anyone's got a better idea.
    A bigger than usual set came thru, double overhead, long period 15-18 sec. <bombs>
    Two broke about 10 feet in front of me. Water's a little crowded. I'm on a 7'11" gun board. I know I can't make it duck dive.
    Whatever I try will end in a rag dolling. I look behind me. There are are two guys back about 20-30 ft., to either side of me, about 8-10 ft. I ditch my board and dive, right underneath it. The explosion is heavy but all's well. Except for the next one. Same thing, but now I come in contact with one guy twice as we're both going through the spin cycle, and we're fairly deep. We both come up for air, no harm, no dings, no damage anywhere. Probably should have turned turtle and held on, but I know the way these waves were breaking, the results would have been pretty much the same. What do those guys at giant Maverick's do in these situations. What would you have done?
    Last edited by tropic surfer; May 5, 2013 at 06:24 PM.

  2. #2
    I've been through some heavy experiences as well. EC hurricanes, Northern Cals heavy water and CR where my leash snapped on a 14 footer and got stuffed deep underwater. Could consider turn and paddle yr arse off and pick up the wave or take it like a rat. Having other people nearby in the water doesnt help. So sitting in a better place in the first place would help. Of course train to be underwater for a duration, practice zen,

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    UGHHH! :(
    Posts
    314
    Yeah when I watch surf videos for the second time, I pay close attention to the surfers in the background. Who's turning turtle, who's duck diving. When I watch longboard contests it amazes me how those guys duck dive effortlessly (having high performance rails and light foam probably doesn't hurt).

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
    Posts
    2,414
    Quote Originally Posted by tropic surfer View Post
    What do those guys at giant Maverick's do in these situations. What would you have done?
    At DOH+ pretty much everybody's just diving off their board at that size. That's why it's really important not to be too close behind the guy ahead of you when paddling out.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    BELMAR, NJ
    Posts
    1,201
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by LBCrew View Post
    At DOH+ pretty much everybody's just diving off their board at that size. That's why it's really important not to be too close behind the guy ahead of you when paddling out.
    i totally agree- its disturbing when the guy ahead of you keeps paddling right in front knowing that your behind him and that guy would proabably bail when a DOH wave comes... then you gotta deal with the wave AND his board in your face...

    SOOOO lets get back to the actual question- cause this is actually a good thread! What do you guys do when 10ft of whitewater is in front of you and you got two guys right behind you- knowing if you bail your board- that it has a fairly good chance at hitting them.

    AND- i should add - for the benefit of that NJ Shreader- i believe it is KNOWN that if your out in DOH waves that you are not going to duck dive a bigger board when the wave breaks right in front of you... PLUS- if your out in DOH.... i really hope that you would already know what a duck dive is ... and could hopefully do it as second nature.... duh...

    That being said- what do you guys think? I never really like the tutle roll and feel like it hardly ever works correctly.... i think the main point is - what do you do when you know two guys are right behind you??? IF no one is around- of coarse a bail and dive to the bottom holding your leash is expected...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Hilton Head Island - OB, SD
    Posts
    3,654
    Images
    26
    To the original poster. This falls in a "grey" area to me, but in my experiences in very heavy winter swells in CA and mexico I.E. Big wednesday, most guys ive been out with are experienced as well in those situations, so simple eye contact and instincts usually keep everyone safe. For instance, I tend to sit a little bit safer in those kind of lineups, since even on huge reefs and points that break almost identically in the same spot, there are always those rouge sets that break 50-60 yards off track.... So, as those rouges are approaching, which you can see from a mile away, everyone starts the scraping and scrambling to get out on the horizon... As this happens, there is usually a natural order and movement like birds. as I paddle out towards the set, I make sure I am aware of my surrounding. I.E. If I see a guy cutting over into my path ahead of me, I begin to take a target line in the opposite direction so as we both paddle further out, we cross paths and continue moving away from each other.... Whenever there are people behind me, I always make sure to look back at them and make some kind of visual contact with them to make sure they see which way I am going, so at the end of the day, when the impact comes or the huge set hits, we usually end up 10-15 feet apart, but almost all lineup next to each other.... This allows everyone to dig as deep as they can, and by this, even with my gun, which is only a 7'2, but I still get as deep as I can... And a true tripple overhead wave at indicators or anywhere in SoCal that can hold it, never break from the top to the flats... when its pushing 20 foot faces, even at a low tide, those spots will break about half way down on the face.... So when you get a barrel on a wave that big in SoCal, you are way up the face, I mean like in the top 1/4 of the face to get inside.... So the point is that on truly huge waves, there is usually a pretty ample slope at the bottom that you can cut your board into and if you go straight down and into it, by the time the impact from the lip comes down, its rolling over and across, not coming right down on you, so if its huge out, cut into the bottom with you gun, push down and hold on for dear life.... I will bear hug it under water so it doesn't catipult into my face or anything like that... I broke a few toes doing this because the final impact was to harsh....

    But if you do all of those things, sometimes you may break a toe.... about 50% of the time, you will come up unscathed and the other 50% of the time, you will be 10-15 feet deep and then the turbulance will rip the board right off of you and your body.... When that happens, at least you know that you have positioned yourself far enough away from the pack that you are looking out for others safety.... Sometimes you will be swimming a mile back to shore with no board, avoiding impending doom from the incoming sets, or you can get lucky like my toe breaking situation, come up from about 20 feet deep, following the light with a 12 second hold down or so, to find that your broken leash and board are floating safely about 10 feet away... that is about the best feeling ever....

    Craziest thing ive seen someone do in the situation you speak of, was at the above mentioned spot, when the set of the day was coming through... me and one guy made it up and over the peak cause we saw it coming way before everyone else... I saw a woman on a longboard, and this wave face was easily 15-17feet, but the lady just turns towards the beach, in her paddling stance and start paddling towards the beach, meanwhile she is in the flats, right out in front of the impact zone, so the 17 footer detonates and then a 12 foot wall of whitewater just mowed her down like a blade of grass..... You could see that board just flipping and flapping through the whitewater all the way to the beach....

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Hilton Head Island - OB, SD
    Posts
    3,654
    Images
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by walkingonh2o View Post

    SOOOO lets get back to the actual question- cause this is actually a good thread! What do you guys do when 10ft of whitewater is in front of you and you got two guys right behind you- knowing if you bail your board- that it has a fairly good chance at hitting them.
    In that situation, if I know for sure that the guys behind me, who by the way are being rude and probably out of position... its dangerous to shoulder hop and try and cheat on the inside like that when its big... But if they are for sure behind me, and they arent making much ground and regardless of what I am about to do, I am going to have to take 10 feet of whitewater mowing me down, I will simple sprint paddle horizontally as far as I can in hopes that I can clear their radius in time and then just drop down pencil style or attempt the duck dive... But if you have to pull a donkey bail, which was all have to do regardless of your duckdiving skills, just move sideways as best you can and then let that mother go.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Berlin MD
    Posts
    439
    Quote Originally Posted by walkingonh2o View Post
    SOOOO lets get back to the actual question- cause this is actually a good thread! What do you guys do when 10ft of whitewater is in front of you and you got two guys right behind you- knowing if you bail your board- that it has a fairly good chance at hitting them.
    ...
    Death grip on the board, bear hug it while duck diving or turning turtle, and try to get through as much of the violence as possible for as long as possible while holding on. Obviously it might eventually get ripped away from you. This also decreases the chance of a snapped leash and long swim.

    If i knew were people right behind me, straight up bailing would increase the chance of my board just shooting back and striking someone in the head.
    Last edited by scotty; May 6, 2013 at 02:28 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    VA Beach
    Posts
    110
    Quote Originally Posted by zach619 View Post
    But if you do all of those things, sometimes you may break a toe
    "Break a toe"? So the extreme turbulence underwater is causing the board to hit you so hard that you're breaking toes? Or did you mean another word (i.e., autocorrect)?

  10. #10
    Hey tropic surfer. In the conditions you describe I would have turned turtle and held on - probably as far forward on the board as possible. That way the front rocker of the gun would point the nose down as much as possible and you might just make it under most of the turmoil.