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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    Hilton Head Island - OB, SD
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    Quote Originally Posted by jasorod View Post
    "Break a toe"? So the extreme turbulence underwater is causing the board to hit you so hard that you're breaking toes? Or did you mean another word (i.e., autocorrect)?
    I should have better explained. In the toe breaking scenario, I scraped as hard as I could thinking I was going to make it over and about 10-15 yards before the wave got to me I realized that I had in fact put myself directly under the lip in the worst possible impact zone, so I pushed down through the bottom of the wave and to get extra deep, I put both feet on the back tailpad of my board and gave it one last push with my feet since the nose was about 5 feet below the tail, so I pushed the tail down with both feet and was probably 7-8 feet under water... The lip just passed over my head and it went down into the water right behind my back, so the lip itself came down underwater and gave the back 2 inches or so my my board a direct hit. I had both sets of my toes bent still on the tail and when the lip hit, it violently had the catipult effect and made the whole nose and top of the board spring into my body. Its broke two of my toes instantly. My big toe on my right foot still aches if I tweak it wrong sometimes.... But I did the right thing and got deep and used my feet and the impact just blast both of my feet. It hurt pretty bad. I still maintained control of the board though. I never lost it, I just had to bear hug it at that point. I stayed out another hour or so but could barely walk the next day.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by walkingonh2o View Post
    That being said- what do you guys think? I never really like the tutle roll and feel like it hardly ever works correctly.... i think the main point is - what do you do when you know two guys are right behind you??? IF no one is around- of coarse a bail and dive to the bottom holding your leash is expected...
    In tall water, I normally just walk my board out. It's much safer than paddling out, plus it gives you more control of your board and it allows more time to prepare for a white wall. I simply flip my board over and tuck my nose just under the surface. 99% of the time, it works every time without my board flying into some dude's face. 1% of the time, your board will buckle/crack/break right in the middle where there is a little air pocket from the rocker inversion.

    I'm still trying to figure out what to do with my halves...

  3. #13
    this just happened to me. outside set came, first wave broke infront of me so i got under it. 2nd wave right on my head, ripped my board out. 3rd wave i said F it and dove to the bottom, came up to a snapped nose. so pissed. always try to hold onto your board.
    Last edited by gnurider7; May 6, 2013 at 03:02 PM.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
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    Western Puerto Rico
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    from the comments on the site listed on pg. 1, (surfing handbook.com/knowledge/duckdiving)..after the article, the part by Dave D. sets the tone:
    "otherwise, trying to hold your board under big snarling whitewater is just going to get it ripping uncontrolling out of your hands, you may get a torn shoulder ligament or cut by a fin, or knock you unconscious..."

    The last time I tried turning turtle under a smaller but still overhead and powerful wave, the board hit me above the forehead, put a cut ding in the epoxy and gave me a slight concussion.
    Aside from the circumstances where the number of people in the water at the time meant that such things could happen, and that this set was sort of a sneaker, not a whole could have been done. Luckily no one was hurt.

    Looked at another way, surfing DOH waves is a little like sailfish, swordfish or marlin fishing. It's called big game fishing because like big game hunting, there's a chance you could get killed. You take your chances.

  5. #15
    Doing just about anything is better than bailing in a situation like the OP's. If you bail, your board is left at the surface to be picked up by the wall of whitewater and it will promptly snow plow into the guys behind you. A turtle roll or even a duck dive, that you know won't be successful, will at least get you and your board under the initial wall of white water. While everyone will probably still end up near each other, there is less chance that there will be a hard impact between fiberglass and their faces.

    But the ocean can throw a lot of curve balls. Sometimes it's just not your day and sh1t happens.

  6. #16
    Double overhead you are ditching and diving as deep as possible.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    Central FL
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    Quote Originally Posted by nynj View Post
    Double overhead you are ditching and diving as deep as possible.
    Yeah, I agree, as long as you don't have anybody directly behind you within leash range which is usually 6-8ft plus your board length. I know I haven't been in anything over 10-15 feet, but i've been pretty close to that and the one thing I always do is paddle to a spot that has nobody directly in front or behind of me and at least 6-8ft to the right / left of me. When it gets too crowded to the point where it doesn't matter what you do, then I get out, it's not worth it at that point IMO.

  8. #18
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by DawnPatrolSUP View Post
    Yeah, I agree, as long as you don't have anybody directly behind you within leash range which is usually 6-8ft plus your board length. I know I haven't been in anything over 10-15 feet, but i've been pretty close to that and the one thing I always do is paddle to a spot that has nobody directly in front or behind of me and at least 6-8ft to the right / left of me. When it gets too crowded to the point where it doesn't matter what you do, then I get out, it's not worth it at that point IMO.
    Yeah, I think now that I am back on the east coast...

    A) I think the days of true DOH clean beach break days in Low Country will be few and far between, but yes out here it is FAR more dangerous to be in a crowd at a beach break.... so when the numbers get too high, its time to move down the way a bit.

    B) In CA where DOH are common place in the winter, no one really surfs beach breaks... There are two beach breaks that I would surf in true DOH conditions... One is North PB and the other is Blacks... Aside from that, once its 6ft+ every beach break in town is a closeout and although you can maybe snap a nice wave here and there, the detonating conditions and various sets sizes never plays out... Out west, you simple go to a reef break or a point... And the scary thing about that is: I.E. Sunset Cliffs... You can paddle out on a 15+ft day through a channel and make the lineup with dry hair... No duck diving. I know the ins and outs of a few spots and it is a LOOOOONNNNG paddle, but you NEVER deal with the realities of the wave sized until you are in the lineup... With that being said, it creates a very confusing environment... Everyone gets really comfortable out there... start to pack together, jocking each other for position on the set waves, but then BAM, that rouge puppy starts coming and everyone realizes that they are basically on top of each other and then sh** happens. People get stuck in someones line that is riding the sets, cant get out of the way...The last minute scramble and dump.... It gets really bad when that happens cause everyone gets too comfortable...

    I think back here on the east, if you are dealing with a true DOH scenerio, just the wearwithall to get out in those conditions and hold your ground already has everyone on their toes and they are ALWAYS paying attention. The currents, the drifting, the peakiness, the unpredictability of the beach breaks we have to surf... I feel like its cant be too common to be in a serious crowd out here in DOH conditions... which is true 10-12 foot surf....

    Furthermore, this is no bash at swellinfo, but if you guys ever put in a surf report, it breaks down what the wave sizes are, and for instance, It considers waist high to be 3 feet. To mean, waist high is 1 foot. 3 feet is a solid head high wave face when you are riding... So there are many factors to consider, but based on the rational of this website and many east coast surfers it seems like, a true double overhead day here would be about 15 feet by their standards....

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by zach619 View Post
    With that being said, it creates a very confusing environment... Everyone gets really comfortable out there... start to pack together, jocking each other for position on the set waves, but then BAM, that rouge puppy starts coming and everyone realizes that they are basically on top of each other and then sh** happens. People get stuck in someones line that is riding the sets, cant get out of the way...The last minute scramble and dump.... It gets really bad when that happens cause everyone gets too comfortable.
    This post reminds me of the monster truck scene from the movie "Rat Race." So, you and your bros are hanging out in the lineup - pass after pass - waiting for the one. You're just sitting on top of your board, bobbing up and down, up one face, down the back - you really can't see the next wave until you get up top or you're on the backside. That's when you see a monster that's going to break way outside. You see it on everyones' faces - what do you do? Do you paddle for the shore and ride the white wash in a bit? Or do you take it like a man and paddle for it? Either way, it's one terrific cluster **** when this happens. That's when you start seeing the boards fly and the broken leashes.

    You know how there's always a dude that's like "hey bro, do you have any wax?" I've seriously had one dude ask me if I had an extra leash on a big day.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    Central FL
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    Quote Originally Posted by dlrouen View Post
    I've seriously had one dude ask me if I had an extra leash on a big day.
    That's gotta be a 1st, to that I would have to respond with something really smartass, "a spare leash? For what, to hang yourself with for being so unprepared?"