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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
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    Turtle Island
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    Quote Originally Posted by DawnPatrolSUP View Post
    That's gotta be a 1st, to that I would have to respond with something really smartass, "a spare leash? For what, to hang yourself with for being so unprepared?"
    Hahahahaha!

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by DawnPatrolSUP View Post
    That's gotta be a 1st, to that I would have to respond with something really smartass, "a spare leash? For what, to hang yourself with for being so unprepared?"
    maybe he wanted to wear two. Alot of big wave guys are wearing two leashes now, Dorian, Healy etc. In case one breaks they have a 2nd, or it adds breaking strength to both.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
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    2,471
    Quote Originally Posted by zach619 View Post
    Out west, you simple go to a reef break or a point... And the scary thing about that is: I.E. Sunset Cliffs... You can paddle out on a 15+ft day through a channel and make the lineup with dry hair... No duck diving...it is a LOOOOONNNNG paddle, but you NEVER deal with the realities of the wave sized until you are in the lineup...
    So true! Guys who surf the biggest days here know that paddling into a macker isn't the biggest challenge... it's getting to the outside without getting hammered, and when it's big and cold, that hammering can bring you to either tears or panic. Then, once you're outside, you gotta get into postion, and stay there 'till a set comes, with all the current and wind that always comes with the biggest days of the year. That's what's so hardcore about the Northeast, IMO. It' ain't no Tres Palmas!

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Hilton Head Island - OB, SD
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    Quote Originally Posted by LBCrew View Post
    So true! Guys who surf the biggest days here know that paddling into a macker isn't the biggest challenge... it's getting to the outside without getting hammered, and when it's big and cold, that hammering can bring you to either tears or panic. Then, once you're outside, you gotta get into postion, and stay there 'till a set comes, with all the current and wind that always comes with the biggest days of the year. That's what's so hardcore about the Northeast, IMO. It' ain't no Tres Palmas!
    No doubt! I have had that debate many times on the west coast. A lot of guys who have surfed OBX etc would agree, but some of the San Diego guys think that a 15 foot day at swamis is like surfing big pipeline or something... The only thing south of Santa Barbara that is gut wrenching to surf is huge blacks... That is comparable to big NC or NJ... Ive been trying to tell guys that for years... They will see 10 foot OBX and be like, ohh thats not that big and Im like, ohhh yes it is... The east coast has currents, winds scattered sets and detonating closeouts. No big fat channels, no easy way out. There is only one way back in... Completely different. I would compare the difficulty of surfing 15 foot Sunset Cliffs or Swamis to about a solid 8FT+ day back east... Just way heavier on the east coast when sh** goes wrong... The east coast can only get so big, but when the size maxed out, the intensity level and the overall ugliness of what can happen out there starts to multiply.

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by zach619 View Post
    No doubt! I have had that debate many times on the west coast. A lot of guys who have surfed OBX etc would agree, but some of the San Diego guys think that a 15 foot day at swamis is like surfing big pipeline or something... The only thing south of Santa Barbara that is gut wrenching to surf is huge blacks... That is comparable to big NC or NJ... Ive been trying to tell guys that for years... They will see 10 foot OBX and be like, ohh thats not that big and Im like, ohhh yes it is... The east coast has currents, winds scattered sets and detonating closeouts. No big fat channels, no easy way out. There is only one way back in... Completely different. I would compare the difficulty of surfing 15 foot Sunset Cliffs or Swamis to about a solid 8FT+ day back east... Just way heavier on the east coast when sh** goes wrong... The east coast can only get so big, but when the size maxed out, the intensity level and the overall ugliness of what can happen out there starts to multiply.
    You are not the only person I have heard say this and many friends I know that have moved out west say the same thing. I've surfed 10 foot Sunset Cliffs and it was a breeze. All the time in the world to drop in, bottom turn, nice well planned cut backs...no wonder surfers have so much style in California. 8-10 foot NJ/NC beachbreak and you are hanging on for dear life most of the time....freight training. If anything 10 foot beach breaks is more like pipeline than 15 foot swamis. However, neither even come close really.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Stayin' Classy in San Diego
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    1,993
    There are no beach breaks in San Diego that will hold anything bigger than a foot or two. And if there were, no one would ever surf them. How would they paddle out and keep their hair dry?

    Nothing to see here, move along.






  7. #27
    I think you proved our point. It looks like a closed out beach break, with one mudskipper on it.

  8. #28
    I learned on the west coast and have been up and down the east. I now live on the east side and I will just say that all the east coast guys have a bad case of envy.
    Me included.I would make the move to San Diego in a minute if my career allowed.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    sea
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    1,721
    when guys surf big waves,with long boards(guns),they ditch their board and spend a lot of time underwater.there is no duckdiving.i don't care what anyone says,but beachbreaks are the most challenging wave their is,not reef breaks.reefs have a designated channel,like in Hawaii,u can paddle out at pipe and sit their for 2 hours just watching the waves,but never in harms way.there is no channel on beachbreaks.all we have is sideshore and rips,and they usually take you out 25-30yards just in time for a solid hollow 6fter breaking on your head.i dive deep,no point trying to duckdive if your not in the face yet.some people like to sprint paddle,i find it best to go slow and take your time,so u can delay when u have to dive.kids waste their energy sprinting,then mistime the dive and wash up on the rocks.

  10. #30
    In big surf, I'll hop off the board, grab the rail saver (Velcro end of leash closest to the tail) pull it down hard while swimming for the bottom. Got out in Irene on a longboard that way without getting beaten too badly.