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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Panama City Beach, Florida, United States
    Posts
    166
    As a person who learned to surf in the exact conditions you describe, the way I learned was to catch as many waves as possible even if its nothing but a drop and a closeout. Do it enough and your wave selection skills will naturally improve. Also make your decision quickly. If you hesitate, you will miss many waves.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    South Shore, MA
    Posts
    180
    As a fellow Masshole, just curious what breaks are you surfing?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Wilmington
    Posts
    2,340
    I find it quite helpful to keep this simple formula in mind when surfing less-than-ideal conditions:


    a539f59f4c80fff1c9de22c03f44ffa2.png

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Turtle Island
    Posts
    4,078
    Images
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by Erock View Post
    I find it quite helpful to keep this simple formula in mind when surfing less-than-ideal conditions:


    a539f59f4c80fff1c9de22c03f44ffa2.png
    Bwahahahahah! That was classic!


    *All in good fun Spicoli don't get upset.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Lipsmacker View Post
    As a person who learned to surf in the exact conditions you describe, the way I learned was to catch as many waves as possible even if its nothing but a drop and a closeout. Do it enough and your wave selection skills will naturally improve. Also make your decision quickly. If you hesitate, you will miss many waves.
    Right on. That's been my mindset - catch as many as possible. Totally agree with the no hesitation as well. Even though I know "there will always be another one", it's a drag to watch one go by you know you'd have liked to take. I made this post today after taking so many drops into closeouts, which certainly do have value in many ways for me starting out. And it's not like more of those reps won't do me good, the definitely will. Just looking for a method to get more reps on attempts of getting down the line and then back in the wave. Thanks for a thoughtful post.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by RIer View Post
    I'm no expert, but it seems to me you have two options, neither of which is perfect.

    First, you can stay inside and try to catch the smaller waves. When a bigger set comes through, you can duckdive it if you're on a shortboard. If you're not on a short board you will either get knocked around or, if you are a strong paddler, can paddle your face off and get over the top.

    The other option is to paddle outside and just wait for the bigger sets. You will get a lot fewer waves, but you will be in position for the biggest waves.

    As for right or left, in beach break you can usually go either direction. Sometimes it will clearly be going one way or the other and then it's obvious.
    Another helpful post, thanks. I've been doing a combination of both of these, depending on which break I'm at and how it's acting that day based on the conditions. When do you typically turtle roll? I've found that if the wave coming at me has broken far before where I am and it hasn't waned in power and volume too much or got close to reform that duck diving is more difficult and less productive. Tried turtle rolling on a handful of those last night for the first time and it seemed to go smooth and I tended to not get pulled back much at all and stayed on the board and started paddling my arse off to get closer to the next where I could duck dive better.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Beaufort
    Posts
    25
    Images
    1
    In choppy conditions on a beach break the peak is going to shift around some before the wave breaks. You just have to line up under the peak the best you can. It helps to watch the wave for the longest amount of time possible before turning around to get into position. Hope that helps-cheers.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by seldom seen View Post
    Spicoli, at work so I didn't get to read through your whole post, but some things to think about...obviously, know which of of your spots work best in various wind directions(once you know a spot goes to shyte in a particular direction, you can cross that off your "to check" list)...know how tide effects your spots(one of my favorites pitches a little harder on the outgoing and then gets all rampy/starts to wrap around like a horseshoe on the incoming)...as far as knowing which direction to go, that's kind of an easy one, maybe comes w/ time, but look both ways and go the way that has the best shoulder/looks like it's gonna peel vs the way that looks like it's gonna close out.
    Good stuff. I've been giving a ton of time to tide watching and seeing how critical that is to how a spot behaves on a given day and time. One thing that's helped this week is looking over both shoulders for a last check before it's reached me to see if I'm still where I want to be in relation to it as well as what the impending break looks like it will do. Also, turning into paddling into waves both right and left has helped get the full peripheral view of the oncoming. Previously, I was typically looking just over my right and turning counter-clockwise into my paddle. I'd say my main issue right now with this is that from my point of deciding to take the wave and then when it arrives it often has changed in appearance of what it's expected to do. More reps and more time will sharpen my assessment though just as you say.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by DrDarkMatter View Post
    In choppy conditions on a beach break the peak is going to shift around some before the wave breaks. You just have to line up under the peak the best you can. It helps to watch the wave for the longest amount of time possible before turning around to get into position. Hope that helps-cheers.
    Exactly. So I do want to be lining up at the peak? That's what I've been doing, but started to think that may be why it's breaking too soon on me. At which point I would imagine I just need to be closer to it and earlier in its formation on the takeoff attempt. I like what you say about watching it for the longest time possible and have been trying that when the period allows and it's enabled me to get more of the desirable ones and commit less to ones that aren't going to be good based on where I am and what's it's formed to and doing relative to my position.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by ClemsonSurf View Post
    1)A good indicator of where the waves may be breaking on a shifty day is the whitewash left over after the wave has passed. You should see some sort of foamy triangle, paddle to about 10-15 feet past that peak and try to find a couple spots on shore to line up with again. Positioning yourself farther out, picking out your wave and paddling earlier will keep your on the face of the wave. It will also get your paddling speed up so you won't have to double arm paddle, you should quit that habit.
    2)Unless the waves are 100 yard close outs you should be able to see which way the wave is going to break by looking at the steeper side. If it's steeper on the right, I'm taking a left. Steeper on the left, I'm taking a right.
    .
    Just what I was looking for, thanks. I do use the landmarks on the shore for nav purposes. The double arm paddle if used at all is on that one final paddle before pop up.