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Thread: Upwelling?

  1. #1

    Upwelling?

    Caught some fun surf last Friday and the water was close to 60. Paddled out today on Long Island and it seemed like the water temperature had dropped at least 5 degrees. Literally got light ice cream headaches after two duck dives. Didn't wear boots or gloves but my hands and feet were borderline going numb. I know that front brought north winds and cooler temps, but it's been like 90 for the past week. Anyone else notice a large drop in water temps overnight? Maybe some type of upwelling?

  2. #2
    surf? long island?? no.

  3. #3
    Unless your area has recently experienced strong W or SW winds for a sustained period of time, so in your case no it would not be upwelling...water is transported 90 degrees to the right in the Northern Hemisphere.

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    I think upwelling in the U.S. only takes place on the west coast.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrDarkMatter View Post
    I think upwelling in the U.S. only takes place on the west coast.
    no we have it on the east coast and it can happen on almost any coast in the world just depends on the winds

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    Quote Originally Posted by SurfnSnow02 View Post
    Unless your area has recently experienced strong W or SW winds for a sustained period of time, so in your case no it would not be upwelling...water is transported 90 degrees to the right in the Northern Hemisphere.
    Long Island faces south, so it will occur when the winds are W/NW. The 'Coriolis Force' deflects the currents to the right, which would mean a W current would get deflected to the South. When currents move away from the coast, it allows for upwelling.

    For east facing beaches its the S/SW currents that create upwelling.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrDarkMatter View Post
    I think upwelling in the U.S. only takes place on the west coast.
    uhhh....no

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrDarkMatter View Post
    I think upwelling in the U.S. only takes place on the west coast.
    congrats. this ranks right up there w/ catmaster's assertion that squash tails make boards both drivey & loose.

  9. #9
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    but to the OP, yes...water here in southern nj was pushing up toward 60 a couple weeks ago, dropped into the low 50's, & has been hovering in the mid-50's since then.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Swellinfo View Post
    Long Island faces south, so it will occur when the winds are W/NW. The 'Coriolis Force' deflects the currents to the right, which would mean a W current would get deflected to the South. When currents move away from the coast, it allows for upwelling.

    For east facing beaches its the S/SW currents that create upwelling.
    Long Island faces S and SSE, hence the W WSW winds needed to create the correct conditions for upwelling to occur, not NW. Should have put WSW instead of SW in my original post.