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Thread: pro surfers

  1. #11
    You wouldn't ride Cloudbreak?!?! Really? How do you surf and not dream of surfing a perfect wave?
    I understand not surfing it when it's huge, but head to a few feet over head at that wave is as good as it gets.

    I get it for Teahupoo. That wave is down right scary. But even chopes on a normal small day looks super fun. It morphs in to a beast when it gets big.

    Quote Originally Posted by waterbaby View Post
    ...and don't tell me you'd ride waves like cloudbreak and teahupoo...like most of us, you'd be sitting out on the shoulder, with a load in your shorts, praying to go back to the pool.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by nynj View Post
    You wouldn't ride Cloudbreak?!?! Really? How do you surf and not dream of surfing a perfect wave?
    I understand not surfing it when it's huge, but head to a few feet over head at that wave is as good as it gets.

    I get it for Teahupoo. That wave is down right scary. But even chopes on a normal small day looks super fun. It morphs in to a beast when it gets big.
    It doesn't have to be big to get hurt or worse, killed. I saw a guy drown at New Smyrna Beach a couple years ago, it wasn't any bigger than 8 feet on the sets, was really dumpy though and the rip was bad. Tropical storm surf if I recall, but the guy was pulled out of the water by one of his students and I watched the paramedics try to revive him for 45 minutes with no luck. He was an experienced surfer, in his late 40's if I recall correctly. I get it for not wanting to surf chopes or any place that has a huge price to pay. Sometimes it's best to not tempt fate. On smaller days like you say though, why not... because reality is, it could happen any time / anywhere in the world.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by nynj View Post
    You wouldn't ride Cloudbreak?!?! Really? How do you surf and not dream of surfing a perfect wave?
    I understand not surfing it when it's huge, but head to a few feet over head at that wave is as good as it gets.

    I get it for Teahupoo. That wave is down right scary. But even chopes on a normal small day looks super fun. It morphs in to a beast when it gets big.
    I've surfed a lot of places. I've surfed many big east coast and west coast hurricane swells, but really big swells on the pacific islands are on a totally different level...and they break over corral/rocks, not sand (as if surfing over shallow corral isn't a skill in itself). The waves are exponentially more massive and powerful in person than you'd ever imagine from pics or video. For instance, even medium swell on oahu's north shore is something that would take the average mainland surfer 6 months to a year to acclimate to...anything over that and you basically have to grow up riding those conditions.

    People talk big on the net...but until I see proof you of surfing the pacific island's top spots, you're just a little b*tch, like the rest of us. Pro surfing is a real job...it's not a boring job, but a real job.
    Last edited by waterbaby; Jul 8, 2013 at 03:30 PM.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by waterbaby View Post
    pro surfing is a real job. They actually get paid quite a good salary by their sponsors...they have a boss and have to do what they're told. Some of the top guys on the wct are millionaires...kelly has net worth of over 24 million dollars and I'm guessing mick fanning is doing quite well right now, too. Just the effort in organizing the traveling around the world every year is a job in itself.
    Pro surfing is not a REAL job, realistically speaking. It does not produce any product for the betterment of humanity. It's a fairy tale job just like modeling or race car driving or professional weight lifting. Pro surfers spend as much (if not more) time organizing personal surf trips, and chasing swells. Pumping gas, medical services, construction, growing food, etc. are real jobs.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by archy View Post
    It does not produce any product for the betterment of humanity.
    Not true, it's called entertainment. And, it makes my life better.

  6. #16
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    You're telling me models don't make the world a better place?! Have you never seen a picture of Reef girls?!!!!

  7. #17
    this entire thread gives me douche chills.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by waterbaby View Post
    I've surfed a lot of places. I've surfed many big east coast and west coast hurricane swells, but really big swells on the pacific islands are on a totally different level...and they break over corral/rocks, not sand (as if surfing over shallow corral isn't a skill in itself). The waves are exponentially more massive and powerful in person than you'd ever imagine from pics or video. For instance, even medium swell on oahu's north shore is something that would take the average mainland surfer 6 months to a year to acclimate to...anything over that and you basically have to grow up riding those conditions.

    People talk big on the net...but until I see proof you of surfing the pacific island's top spots, you're just a little b*tch, like the rest of us. Pro surfing is a real job...it's not a boring job, but a real job.
    There is so much truth to this. Those swells move so fast and are so powerful coming right out of deep open ocean onto shallow reef. There is absolutely no comparison to anything on the east coast US even with DOH hurricane swells, or really even anyting in California besides Mavericks. Even Cloudbreak at a few feet overhead is a very challenging, powerful, and scary wave, much like alot of the spots on the North Shore as well.

    I don't think pro surfing is a real job though in the relative sense of the word. I really don't think any professional athelete is a real job honestly. It's a job to them as far as traveling hassles and marketing themselves, but to the rest of the world it's pretty much a fantasy land. When you are surfing the best waves in the world in two man heats not one of those guys is ever complaining after the heats.

  9. #19
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    Real job = for most people, being miserable doing something you don't necessarily love or even like, but do it because it pays the bills. By this definition pro surfing is not a "real job", BUT, I would give up my "real job" to be a pro surfer any day of the week. They get to do what they LOVE to do every single day, and get paid for it. That to me is REAL, and the way it should be when we consider what a "real job" is.

    We are limited by our own thought process, we have been programmed to believe that going to school, getting a "good job" and working for a living is what it's all about, but to those who have been lucky enough or those who have worked hard enough to get paid doing something that they love like surfing have it figured out, not the other way around.

    Do you really love programming computers for a living? Do you love digging ditches? Do you love selling that widget? Do you love serving that customer? Do you love your little two week vacation, your 401k, your staff meetings, your annual review, or your 30 minute - 1hr lunch break??? Or would you rather be catching waves and cashing checks? Do you really love clocking in at 8:30am and clocking out at 5:30pm? I know I don't, i'd much prefer to clock in when my toes touch salt water and clock out when they return to the sand....

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by leethestud View Post
    this entire thread gives me douche chills.
    My immediate nomination for post of the year. A classic leethestud post.